ComplexCon 2018: Gucci Ghost Artist Trevor Andrew Debuts Line

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST: Trevor Andrew, known for his Gucci Ghost collaboration with Gucci, can now add streetwear line Real Buy to his resume.
Andrew was on hand at ComplexCon this past weekend to debut the Real Buy, which was initially teased online on Nov. 1 with a long-sleeve T-shirt. For ComplexCon, the artist brought hand-painted jackets, which lined the walls of his space. There were also short- and long-sleeve T-shirts retailing for $ 65 and $ 90, respectively, bearing seven different designs.
“I’ve always been making stuff so it’s nice when I find somebody that believes in what I’m doing and they give the free reins to do what I do. That’s always a good scenario,” Andrew said of the Real Buy while sitting on a couch in the brand’s booth Saturday.
Andrew’s ComplexCon buildout re-created his Koreatown studio, which he moved into last year after working out of Brooklyn for 17 years. The booth came complete with painted floors mirroring his actual work space and free tattoos done on site.
Andrew’s art has been seen in places such as Dover Street Market in Tokyo and Milk Gallery in New York. The artist, who is a former pro snowboarder, has also worked with the aforementioned

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How The Walking Dead’s Andrew Lincoln Became the Star of TV’s Biggest Show–and Why He’s Giving It All Up

The Walking Dead Season 8, Andrew LincolnIt’s the end of the road for Rick Grimes.
And when the iconic main character of AMC’s hit series The Walking Dead goes gently into the good night–or however it happens–in his…

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Andrew Lincoln, The Walking Dead and How Other TV Shows Handle Lead Actor Exits

The Walking DeadAndrew Lincoln is saying goodbye to the blood, guts and perpetual dirtiness of The Walking Dead on Sunday, Nov. 4.
Yes, after nearly a decade of playing Rick Grimes on the AMC drama,…

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The Walking Dead: Andrew Lincoln’s final scenes teased

Andrew Lincoln’s departure from The Walking Dead next week has been called a “giant season finale in the middle of the season”.
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Andrew Gn RTW Spring 2019

Andrew Gn is something of a magpie when it comes to collecting art and antiques, and his collection inspirations often reflect that. For spring, he namechecked Sixties model Veruschka, the Bloomsbury Group and Russian artist Kazimir Malevich. What do they have in common, one might ask?
For one, a bold approach to pattern and ornamentation, which were the foundations of this lineup. The opening look, a fringed poncho dress with a graphic black-and-white motif, was a continuation of his resort line. Gn is on something of a mission to bring back monochrome clothes in an Internet age obsessed with color.
He showed how that minimal palette could be made compelling for online shoppers by using white as a bold accent, such as a bib studded with metal eyelets on a bell-sleeved black cocktail dress, or as a decorative element, in the shape of folkloric guipure lace patterns on a fringed zippered coat dress.
At the same time, he didn’t shy away from bold color statements, via retro-tinged brocade — as seen on a bubblegum-pink coat with oversize crystal buttons — or the vibrant jewel-hued gowns that capped the display, including a rippling peridot-colored tunic worn with electric blue python boots.
Seasonal trends may come

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Andrew Gn Resort 2019

Andrew Gn wants to bring back black and white in an Internet age obsessed with color.
Like many designers, he has felt under pressure to use bright hues to make his outfits pop for online buyers. But what about those chic wardrobe staples like a white shirt and a little black dress? “It’s very tricky these days — anything which is visually uninteresting is not really salable online,” he said.
For his resort collection, Gn found a compromise of sorts: graphic black-and-white patterns inspired by the Vienna Secession art movement. A black dress with three-quarter-length sleeves featured the geometric motifs at the neckline and hem, while a day dress came in a deconstructed houndstooth print.
A checkerboard pattern was a recurring motif that translated into color, namely in a yellow-and-white cape dress embroidered with an oversized gold brooch motif. And there were still plenty of Instagram-friendly designs, including dresses in a charming narcissus print.
Still, Gn hopes the tide will turn back in favor of darkness.
“There’s only so many colors you can wear, and sometimes you feel safe and protected and more relaxed in black,” he mused. “I still think that black is a very essential part of the wardrobe, and I truly believe

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Andrew Lincoln Is Leaving The Walking Dead After Season 9: Report

The Walking Dead Season 8 Finale, Andrew LincolnGet ready to say goodbye to Rick Grimes.
Andrew Lincoln, who has starred as the lead of AMC’s The Walking Dead since the pilot, will reportedly be leaving the series after appearing…

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Andrew Marr to have kidney operation

The BBC presenter, who will go into hospital this week, is expected to make a “full recovery”.
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Amber Portwood Dishes on 2nd Pregnancy and BF Andrew

The "Teen Mom OG" star opens up to E! about the name she's chosen for unborn son and whether she and BF Andrew Glennon will get married. Watch!
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Andrew Lloyd Webber: My career in 7 songs

The composer shares the untold stories behind Cats, Joseph, Evita and Phantom of the Opera.
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Andrew Gn Pre-Fall 2018

“I call this collection ‘Jackie O going to Kyoto to meet the royal family of Japan,’” declared Andrew Gn, with his trademark mix of erudition and tongue-in-cheek humor.
In practice, his pre-fall lineup centered on casual chic day options — think oversize coats, ample culottes and ruffled blouses — done in a zingy palette of acid-bright colors.
Key to the look was a woven motif, inspired by a kimono fabric from the Edo period, that blended floral designs with bright dégradé effects, in a nod to his Japanese grandmother and his own penchant for collecting antiques.
The custom-made fabric came in a sky blue-to-lemon yellow variant on a bell-shaped skirt, which was paired with a pale pink blouse in a colorful floral pattern inspired by a Minton porcelain motif. Gn threw in chunky pearls, a sequined handbag and blood-red suede boots for good measure.
“My goal is to do something that cannot be copied within 48 hours,” he said of his soigné aesthetic, with its abundance of handcrafted details. “We’re living in this high-tech world and everything moves so fast. The most luxurious thing now, and also in the future, will be things made by human hands.”
Nonetheless, the designer believes in making life easy

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Adriaen Black Launches E-commerce Site With Casual Clothes Inspired by Andrew Jang’s Pro-athlete Clients

GAME ON: Adriaen Black founder Andrew Jang has been creating bespoke clothes for pro athletes and is broadening his reach with more casual direct-to-consumer pieces.
The designer’s introductory collection includes $ 100 T-shirts, $ 275 hoodies and letterman and bomber jackets starting at $ 350. Each item has whimsical graphics, like one of a man seated on a bear with a baited fishing pole.
Reached in Dallas on Wednesday, the designer said he had appointments with the Houston Texans’ Jelani Jenkins, the Oakland Raiders’ EJ Manuel, Kansas City Chiefs’ Eric Berry and Baltimore Ravens’ Justin Forsett. On Super Bowl Sunday, Jang will be suiting up Philadelphia Eagles Brandon Graham and Caleb Sturgis off-the-field. Pro athletes have been asking Jang for a while to create styles that their families and friends could buy, so he decided to get into e-commerce. Jang said, “It just became one of those things, when people keep asking, you’re either really smart about it or you’re not. I decided if they’re asking, let’s see what we can do.”
Inspired by athletes that he works with, Jang created styles that are more mainstream and affordable. If first-year sales hit 10,000 units, that would make the company “very profitable,” Jang said.
He will also have

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"Versace" Cast Talks Focusing On Shooter Andrew Cunanan

Darren Criss, Nina Jacobson and more of the "Versace" cast and crew discuss focusing on shooter Andrew Cunanan instead of Gianni Versace.
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Andrew Cuomo Getting Small-Screen Treatment in Prison Break Miniseries

Michael Imperioli, a New York native famous for his role as Christopher Moltisanti in the HBO series “The Sopranos,” will play New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo in a limited Showtime series focused on a 2015 upstate prison break.
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Salvatore Ferragamo Appoints Paul Andrew Creative Director, Women’s Collections

MILAN — The trifecta format didn’t work.
On Thursday, Salvatore Ferragamo revealed that Paul Andrew, who had joined the company as women’s footwear director in September last year, will now be in charge of the women’s wear ready-to-wear line as well. His first collection for the brand in this new role will bow for fall 2018. Andrew will oversee the development of all women’s product categories, as well as the creative contents of all marketing, communication and image activities.
The appointment was made public after trading hours in Milan, where the Florence-based company is listed. Shares closed down 1.51 percent to 22.79 euros.
In November 2016, Fulvio Rigoni was appointed women’s ready-to-wear design director and Guillaume Meilland as men’s rtw design director. Rigoni debuted his looks on the catwalk in September 2016, but his efforts have received a mixed response, while Andrew’s footwear collections have generally been praised.
“Paul has a dynamic vision for the Ferragamo woman, which he has demonstrated with crystal precision and success in footwear over the past year,” said chief executive officer Eraldo Poletto. “He has a sensitivity for the essential codes and values of the Ferragamo house, and is able to recast and reassert them with an exciting, modern energy. I

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Andrew Garfield Breathes in Oscar buzz

This year’s BFI London Film Festival opens with Andrew Garfield’s new film, Breathe.
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Andrew Rannells, Tommy Dorfman Enjoy a Casual Approach to NYFW: Men’s

July’s heat wave had Skylight Clarkson Sq baking on Wednesday afternoon, but the temperature couldn’t have been more appropriate for Parke & Ronen’s swimsuit-filled 20th anniversary show.
“This is my first time at [Parke & Ronen],” said Andrew Rannells. “I am a fan of their swimsuits and I’ve worn those swimsuits for a long time and I love their leisurewear. I expect they’re releasing a variety of things, so I’m looking forward to it. I can tell already that it’s a fun show and the vibe here is a little more relaxed.”
The two-time Tony nominee spent Tuesday at the Hugo Boss show, which was the “polar opposite” of what he was expecting to see this afternoon. “It was a lot of outerwear, very cool trenchcoats and leather jackets,” he said. “They had some really amazing, nautical looking things.” While some may have spent last night partying with Raf Simons, Rannells admitted he was actually at home binge-watching “Bloodline.” Ah, the joys of  Netflix in the summer. “I have two episodes left,” he said. “I decided that last night I needed to go to bed at, like, one o’clock. I was like, ‘I could muscle through, but to what end?’”
Seated nearby was Tommy

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NBA’s big paydays dwarf Andrew Luck’s $140 million deal last year

NBA’s big paydays dwarf Andrew Luck’s $ 140 million deal last year
www.espn.com – NFL

Colts furthest from being Super Bowl contenders with Andrew Luck since 2012

Colts furthest from being Super Bowl contenders with Andrew Luck since 2012
www.espn.com – NFL

Nonfiction: The AIDS Fight: Andrew Sullivan on a History of the Movement

David France’s remarkable “How to Survive a Plague” is the prose version of France’s Oscar-nominated documentary of the same name.
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Colts rule out Andrew Luck, Tolzien to start (Yahoo Sports)

photos The Colts will be without Andrew Luck on Thanksgiving against the Pittsburgh Steelers. (AP)

Indianapolis will start Scott Tolzien, who hasn’t taken a regular season snap, and re-signed free agent Stephen Morris. But the kicker is who their emergency backup is …



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‘It Follows’ Director Lands Next Film With Andrew Garfield Attached to Star

David Robert Mitchell is set to direct his original script, “Under the Silver Lake,” with Andrew Garfield attached to star. The pic is a modern-day noir crime thriller set in Los Angeles. The film is Mitchell’s follow-up to his critically acclaimed horror “It Follows,” with production set to start at the end of the summer…. Read more »

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‘America’s War for the Greater Middle East,’ by Andrew J. Bacevich

How myths about the efficacy of American military power lead us to ignore its harmful consequences.
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‘America’s War for the Greater Middle East,’ by Andrew J. Bacevich

How myths about the efficacy of American military power lead us to ignore its harmful consequences.
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Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield Have Officially Split

Boooo. Grab your tissues because we have some bad news: Power couple Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield are officially broken up. According to People, Andrew and Emma actually split a few months ago. "There was…


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Andrew McMahon Reveals the Real Story Behind Something Corporate’s “Konstantine”

Andrew McMahon is the voice of a generation—at least, he is for pop-punk die-hards in the early 2000s. This year marks two big anniversaries for the songwriter: Jack’s Mannequin’s debut album, Everything in Transit, turned…


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Andrew Lincoln Dropped His Script Over Crazy Upcoming ‘Walking Dead’ Episode

Look at the flowers, “Walking Dead” fans. Season 6 is going to blow your minds.

(Warning! Spoilers!)

The Season 6 premiere of “The Walking Dead” aired Sunday, and wow. After discovering an army of walkers trapped not far from Alexandria, Rick convinced everyone to follow his pretty insane idea to lead all the walkers away at once. Then, just when you think they’re finally in the clear, a mysterious horn sounded from the direction of Alexandria, leading all the walkers directly there. 

Holy crud. And it’s about to get even more nuts. 

The Huffington Post caught up with star Andrew Lincoln at the “Walking Dead” fan premiere. He said the show eclipses its zombie count from all of last season in the first three episodes of Season 6, and ”every single episode is like a season finale.”

“The fallout in those last 30 seconds sort of propels the story arc for the next maybe eight episodes, and get ready — because two and three are like body blows and then four spins out into this indie arthouse movie — then five, six, seven, eight – I think nine is the most crazy episode we’ve had. I dropped my script when I read it. I was just like, ‘Nooo! We’re doing that?'” said Lincoln. ”So yeah, it’s crazy. It’s amazing storytelling. I think [showrunner] Scott Gimple and the team have just outdone themselves this season.”

Yep. Time to get excited. And crazy episodes aren’t the only thing coming. Rick Grimes also told us a fallen friend is making a return to the show. 

“The beard is definitely coming back. I was campaigning for it,” said Lincoln.

Hallelujah! It’s back! Rick Grimes‘ heavenly beard is back! Fear the beard, walkers. 

Fear. The. Beard.

Image: AMC/Celebitchy

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Andrew McMahon Looks Back at Jack’s Mannequin’s Everything in Transit 10 Years Later

Andrew McMahon is an artist many of us may remember growing up with. As a teenager, you were singing along to Something Corporate's “If U C Jordan” and “Punk Rock Princess"; by college, it was…


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Andrew McMahon Looks Back at Jack’s Mannequin’s Everything in Transit 10 Years Later

Andrew McMahon is an artist many of us may remember growing up with. As a teenager, you were singing along to Something Corporate's “If U C Jordan” and “Punk Rock Princess"; by college, it was…


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Barren Optimism: How My Photography Is Influenced by Andrew Wyeth’s Paintings

2015-08-20-1440105093-2552010-Sunflowers023WadingThroughLR.jpg
“Barren Optimism” Photo Credit: Heather Hummel Photography

I captured this self-portrait, titled “Wading Through,” at King Family Vineyards in rural Crozet, Virginia. When I asked the owner, James King, about the field’s status, he indicated that it had peaked two weeks earlier, on July 12th. He could not have known that was also my 50th birthday.

The next day, I ventured out to the field anyway. I passed a polo match, carrying my camera, lenses, filters, and tripod, and headed to the way-back corner of the property. When I turned the corner past the long fences, I liked what I saw. The sunflowers were mostly died off with just enough still hanging in there. The metaphor was strong. It set a different tone than the typical field of flowers–one that began a photo shoot that was inspired by my love for Andrew Wyeth’s work.

The sunflower scene brought the words “barren optimism” to mind, Andrew Wyeth’s “Christina’s World” being my inspiration.

Having studied Wyeth’s work some years ago, I knew that he and I shared a lot of commonalities beyond our mutual respect for hillsides and nature. We share the same birthday, July 12th (his 1917, mine 1965); he is one of five children, I am one of six; he had a medically challenged childhood that kept him home schooled, I was home most of my 3rd grade year due to a congenital heart defect that lead to my first open heart surgery in 1974; and one of his many muses was his dog who looked just like my own dog, Stephan.

It was Wyeth’s work “Master Bedroom” that became my favorite even before Stephan came into my life.
2015-08-20-1440104979-2308265-StephanScarf.jpg
“Stephan” Photo Credit: Heather Hummel Photography

Wyeth spent his years between his home in Pennsylvania and his summer home in Maine. I grew up in New England, but have traveled across the United States several times. We are both inspired by nature, and I find that his work rather barren with a hint of optimism, hence my term barren optimism.

As can happen with a muse or inspiration, I hadn’t realized how much Wyeth’s work had influenced my photography until I captured the sunflower field self-portrait. Wyeth remains a favorite, and during my future photo shoots, I will certainly have him in the back of my mind as I analyze the scene before me, the light, and the opportunity for barren optimism.

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Receive a Free Gift Box with purchase of Dr. Andrew Weil for Origins Mega-Bright Serum & Dark Circle Minimizer

Receive a Free Gift Box with purchase of Dr. Andrew Weil for Origins Mega-Bright Serum & Dark Circle Minimizer


Giving the gift of Origins skin care? Here’s the perfect way to wrap it up for that lucky someone! Receive a Free Gift Box with purchase of Dr. Andrew Weil for Origins Mega-Bright Serum & Dark Circle Minimizer.

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Does This Photo Mean Emma Stone & Andrew Garfield Are Dating Again?

Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone did what people who aren’t together rarely do … grocery shop.

Andrew and Emma were at Ralphs in Malibu Saturday lookin’ all domestic. It’s the first time they’ve been seen together since their heavily-rumored breakup back in March.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Are Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield Back Together? They Were Seen Holding Hands…

When news broke that Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield were taking a relationship break, we were hoping the two would reconcile. And happy news: Those dreams might just be coming true! How so? E! News…




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Emma Stone Says Her ‘Heart Swells Up’ When She Hears Andrew Garfield’s ‘Poetic’ Words

Everyone’s favorite Hollywood couple, Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield, may have split in April, but the actress can still appreciate Garfield’s way with words.

The “Aloha” star sat down with Diane Keaton for her cover story in Interview magazine, for which the two reflected on their careers and shared movie memories. During the interview, Keaton also quoted something Garfield said about Stone in the actresses’ July 2012 cover issue of Vogue.

“Andrew Garfield said, ‘Working with Emma was like diving into a thrilling, twisting river and never holding on to the sides,'” Keaton says to Stone. “‘From the start. To the end. Spontaneous. In the moment. Present. Terrifying. Vital. The only way acting with someone should be.’ My God. I mean, what did you feel when you heard such a dream-come-true observation?”

Stone praised Garfield: “He is such a poet,” she said, laughing. “But that’s the way he writes in general. So I hear it and of course my heart swells up. And I also know that he writes things like that on a daily basis.”

Although Stone and Garfield had previously dated since 2011, the two reportedly broke up last month over what sources cited as issues with long distance. However, Stone’s Interview with Keaton took place in March, before the split, according to People magazine. Either way, we’re going to pretend Garfield is still writing his heart-swelling poetry every day.

For more, head to Interview.

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Man of the Week: Andrew Cuomo

The New York Governor, who led a trade mission to Cuba earlier this week, is trying for a business casual look, but he’s not executing it very well.

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Chatting with The Boxmasters’ Billy Bob Thornton & J.D. Andrew, Plus Goodnight Moonshine, Lines West and Doug Burr Exclusives

GOODNIGHT MOONSHINE’S “DARK SIDE OF THE RAINBOW” MASHES PINK FLOYD WITH THE WIZARD OF OZ

2015-04-07-1428374670-5104823-image.jpg
photo courtesy of Seth Cohen PR

The video of the song “Dark Side of the Rainbow” is a mashup of Pink Floyd’s “Time” from Dark Side of the Moon, and “Over The Rainbow” from The Wizard of Oz. Their aim is to pull back the curtain not only the urban legend of the Pink Floyd album but also to reveal the tension that often exists within a new marriage.

According to Eben Pariser…

“The whole thing emerged from the 90s phenomenon of syncing The Wizard of Oz movie to the Dark Side of the Moon album, and all the speculation that the coincidences were way too precise for Pink Floyd to not be in on it, especially since they were making movie soundtracks at the time. When I was 16 (after allegedly indulging in the stoner-sport of syncing the film to the album,) I spontaneously realized that ‘Time’ was in fact a perfect reharmonization of ‘Over The Rainbow’–but it took me 16 more years to find the right vehicle to record and perform the mashup, in my lovely wife Molly and our collaboration, Goodnight Moonshine.'”

According to Molly Ventor…

“We set out wanting to convince people that Pink Floyd intentionally synched the album to​ The Wizard of Oz. During the filming, we realized how closely the 2 sets of lyrics paralleled the different sides of a longstanding philosophical argument we’d been having;​ Venter believing that much in life is out of one’s control and that we must remain hopeful and optimistic, Pariser believing more in the power of individual will and action, and that missed opportunities are one’s own fault. Through the taping we recognized​ we were each trying to convince the other of our own life perspective. ​The video captures how painful that endeavor is. We’re a newlywed couple, letting you in on our life together through our music. All the good stuff, but also the dark stuff, challenging stuff–the stuff that often goes unsaid. No kitsch. And largely positive and healing through the revelation that we are at the core, just normal folks trying to make a marriage work. A positive loving relationship, and a deeply artistic and somewhat daring one.”

For more on : http://www.goodnightmoonshine.com

******************************

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A Conversation with Billy Bob Thornton

Mike Ragogna: Billy, your group The Boxmasters has been working on its double CD Somewhere Down The Road for a while now. How does The Boxmasters hit you these days as opposed to when you were just starting out with the group?

Billy Bob Thornton: In the beginning, we didn’t really know how long it would last. It was kind of like a side project for my solo stuff. We thought we’d make that record and maybe another one and that would be it. It began as a sort of stylized thing. We were experimenting with a combination of British Invasion and hillbilly music and putting them together and wearing the suits in tribute to the sixties, which is the era we love. The first two or three records were almost like art projects. Like I said, they were very stylized. If you remember the first Boxmasters record, it had transitional music, so it never stopped. We put an extra CD of covers in each record as a bonus, songs we loved and that inspired and influenced us.

After those records were done and we parted ways with Vanguard Records, we thought we’d gone as far as we could. Then all of a sudden, we just started writing songs and playing the way we naturally sound as opposed to trying for a specific thing. On the first record, we were doing Mott The Hoople, The Beatles, The Byrds and singing it like David Allan Coe. Then JD and Brad and I started writing these songs and we just played them the way we naturally sound. As it turns out, the reason we made this new record a double is because we sound like two things. We have that moody sort of dark, atmospheric sound, and then we have this very late sixties LA country rock sound in the vein of The Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, Burrito Brothers, with some influence of Petty and people like that. We discovered that that’s who we really are. We’ve written probably two or three hundred songs that aren’t even on records; we’ve got five or six songs that have already been mastered that aren’t out. We’re just going to sell those records on the website because we’ve got so many. That sound on Somewhere Down The Road–on the first side especially–is kind of what those other songs sound like. We’ve kind of finally settled into that.

MR: Do you feel like you guys reached this point creatively because of what’s going on in your personal lives? Maybe you’ve “matured” in some ways, if that’s the right word?

BT: I think that’s a good word for it. We have matured as songwriters, musicians, singers, everything. I think you can’t help doing something for so long that you’re just going to get better. We’ve gotten better over the years. I think we have more confidence. We know we can write songs and we know we can write songs that people can respond to as opposed to whatever weird stuff is in our head that we experiment with. I think we have definitely matured. I think recording is probably my favorite thing to do in music. We love playing live, that’s a great thing, but being in the recording studio is such a part of our souls and so natural to us. I love acting, I love doing movies and I love music, I love them all equally, but I think I only like the process of actually doing the stuff. I love the process of recording, I love the process of doing movies as an actor, I just don’t like all the other junk that’s involved with it. So maybe in the recording studio, you just feel exempt from everything when you’re in there. It’s like you’re hidden in a cave somewhere alone doing what you’re feeling in the moment. I guess that’s why we recorded so many songs; we just keep going. Even ones that aren’t intended to come out maybe. We get an idea for a song that probably isn’t commercially viable but we record it anyway because we want to.

MR: The process is more important than an end result. How is your creative expression different or the same in the fields of acting and music?

BT: They both really do feed my soul. Not only are they both very cathartic–I know that word is probably very overused but they truly are–but I just love the artistry of both. The thing is you get to experience what’s in your mind in different ways. It feels the same inside, it’s just as good both ways, but you get to experience your art in a different way. But to me, they’re really the same thing, just expressed in different ways. I never expected to become and actor of any stature. It just kind of happened. Because of that I always approach things this way: I’d rather have a hundred or two hundred really hardcore fans than millions of fans who just treat it like anything else and you get slagged off half the time and some of them are sort of interested or some hate it and some like it. It’s that end result thing you were talking about. I don’t do anything with that in mind. I never expect that we’re going to have a hit and I don’t particularly care if we do. It would be wonderful, but that’s not why we do it. That’s not why I do anything in movies either.

MR: You talked about fans who would really “get” what you put out. Can you identify what that kind of fan is, what your core fans love about The Boxmasters?

BT: Generally, our fans are people who like an eclectic mix of things. They’re people who aren’t diehard rock ‘n’ roll fans or die hard country fans, it’s kind of hard to identify our music and I think it’s kind of hard to identify our fans. We tend to have fans that are either forties and fifties and up or twenty year-olds. It’s sort of that middle range in there, people from thirty to forty, I don’t think we have as many of them for some reason. That could be because of whatever time they grew up in. I think maybe people in that age range were sort of spoon fed a particular fashion statement and things were put in boxes more when those people were growing up, whereas when I was growing up everything was very eclectic. I listened to Hank Williams and The Mothers Of Invention in the same day, and the radio would play James Taylor and Black Sabbath on the same station.

I think maybe the reason we have some younger fans is because that’s sort of starting to come back around. A lot of people are really down on music right now, but I see that even sometimes people of my generation are the ones trying to fit into a mold more and more. You see guys who were singing Vietnam protest songs and now they’re on the cover of a magazine doing a duet with a pop star so they can remain current. I’m finding that some of the guys in the younger bands are real fans of The Boxmasters because they themselves are looking for their thing like we were in the sixties. So when they hear something slightly off the beaten path they really dig it. I actually have hope for music right now. I really do. I didn’t before. Everybody knows the eighties was kind of a bizarre generation. The nineties had a little resurgence but then it kind of went away for a decade or so, but I think it’s really coming back. People are looking for different things. People are listening to certain metal bands as well as Mumford and Sons or the Old Crow Medicine Show, people like that. I think it’s on an upswing. Also young kids, say teenagers up until young twenties, are discovering The Beatles and Buffalo Springfield and Aerosmith and whoever it was along the way. There are plenty of twenty year olds who listen to Deep Purple and Zeppelin and The Who and everything like that.

MR: Since you’re a pretty solid music expert, doesn’t understanding what went into making classic, high-quality albums make the process a bit intimidating for you? Like how do you balance striving for that caliber while just expressing yourself and letting creativity flow?

BT: I think it’s two things. One is never forgetting history. Never forget that history of all the great classic albums over the years, letting them influence you and not being ashamed to say, “Yeah, absolutely, we were trying to be The Beatles” or The Stones or The Animals or whatever, that’s our desire. The bar was set very high for people of my generation. We all wanted to be The Beatles and we knew we were never going to be, that it was going to be impossible. You’re always reaching for an impossible goal, so you never get lazy about it. You’re always striving and you’re always desperate for acceptance and approval and everything. When the bar has been set that high you just never stop trying. At the same time, a good part of that is you have such great music and songwriting to draw from, you let it wash over you and influence you.

The second part is that you have to remain open to new things. We’re not trying to just copy old stuff that we love. We’re knot like that. We’re truly not the old guys chasing the kids out of the yard. We really do respect the evolution of music. I think you have to be open, resect the evolution of music and at the same time hold on to your history. You put those two things together and it’s very satisfying to you. Whether anybody is going to respond to it or not, that’s up to them. We have no control over it, but for us, if we accomplish those things, always striving to get better, always striving to be open to new possibilities and yet never letting our history die in our minds, the best of you comes out and you know at the end of the day that you’re not leaving any stone unturned. It’s very satisfying.

MR: These two CDs represent a fraction of the songs that you’ve recorded. So what was the assembly process like that led to this particular album?

BT: We were writing new songs to make an album, but when you’re writing songs, one day you may not feel a song that’s in that vein, so you write something else. It’s like, “Well, that doesn’t belong here. I love the song but it just doesn’t belong in this particular group of songs that we started.” So we took the maybe twenty or so songs that we had that were new and said, “Wow, we’ve only got five of these jangly, Byrds-like LA rock songs and we’ve got seven of these moody things. That doesn’t make one album.” So we went back into some of the songs we’d written before. I think the earliest ones on this record are from 2010. There were two or three of those that exactly fit what we were doing now. We had started writing this whole record of very sixties-like songs using a Farfisa Vox Continental Organ, and we said, “You know what? If that organ was a B3 instead those songs would totally fit this record.” So we had Teddy Andreadis, our keyboard player, just come over and replace the Farfisa with a B3 and suddenly they belonged on the album. Once we got those songs together, the label people, Mark and Tammy Collie who signed us to 101 Ranch Records, had certain favorites that were in the moodier side. We side, “Gosh, we don’t want to put out just a moody record right now because we want people to hear these pop rock songs. Let’s ask them if we can do a double album.” They were all for it. I guess, as they say, it was no skin off their nose. We ended up saying, “Well look, these are the songs we love; let’s just make two records.”

So we wrote new songs and collected ones from other recording sessions that just fit and ended up with the two records we really wanted. The other five or six records that we had finished we didn’t want to break up because they fit together too. There are songs from all of those records that could’ve gone on this, and as a matter of fact some songs where we were like, “I wish we could put this on here, it really fits,” but we didn’t want to break those records up. As a result, we ended up saying, “We’ll sell those on the website at a later time.” We do have a real nice cult following, people who really love us. There aren’t a lot of them, but they’re great. We thought, “What we’ll do is we’ll even maybe put out five song or six song EPs of songs we don’t have enough of that style to make a whole record.” Some of them are even in demo form. We thought it might be interesting every now and then to put on the website a five song EP of songs that aren’t even finished, so people can hear what it’s like before, say, the lead guitar’s on there, or there’s no background vocals or something like that. Then later on, we’ll finish those and put them up finished.

MR: To me, the title track, “Somewhere Down The Road,” is the centerpiece of the album. For you, are there a couple of other tracks that are really important for the project?

BT: There’s a song on the first side called “This Game Is Over” which is a particular favorite of ours. On the moody side there’s a song called “What Did You Do Today?” which I think is what they’re putting out on Americana radio mainly and a song called “Somewhere” that we’re really in love with. It’s a very different-sounding song. It’s got a very different chord progression and I sing it slightly differently. But you love all your songs and you hope other people will, but sometimes you might have a favorite song that nobody else responds to and then you have another song where you say, “Eh, that’s kind of a standard song,” and everybody’s crazy about it. You never know. But “This Game Is Over,” a song called “Getting Past The Lullaby,” which I think is a beautiful song. Anybody who loves their mother is going to love that song.

MR: What do you feel about The Boxmasters’ legacy? When you look at this body of your work as well as the unreleased albums, what are your observations?

BT: I truly believe that if we had been twenty-five or thirty years old in 1968 or 1973, we would have been a huge band. I think we probably make music the way we do and with the passion that we do for thirty or forty years from now and not for today. I feel that someday, we will be an appreciated band, so I kind of look at it that way. We do it for ourselves and we do it the way we feel. We don’t craft anything tailor-made to be a hit, but I do believe that someday when people hear the thousand songs that we have I think some music geek is going to say, “Hey, you know what? I think these guys are worth their salt.”

MR: Billy, what advice do you have for new artists?

BT: I would say first and foremost learn the history. It’s like for you, as a journalist and as a writer, someone who is a fan but also makes a living at it, if you didn’t know who Walter Cronkite was, or Edward R. Murrow or Mark Twain or Jim Morrison or Chuck Berry was, if you weren’t real familiar with them, then you don’t have the education that it takes to truly be an artist. I would tell them, “Don’t just look at what’s shiny and bright in front of you right now. Always learn your history.” Also, if you’re a singer or a guitar player or whatever it is, even if your intention is to become famous doing whatever’s popular, if you’re content to let someone else write the songs and you just be the artist, I would say still write anyway. Even if you don’t intend to put it out there, even if you don’t feel it’s good, I think writing is an exercise that just makes you better whether it’s ever going to be seen or heard by the public or not. And write it from your heart and do it the way you feel it. Don’t try to copy anybody. Even if your life is going to be about copying and becoming popular and doing the current thing, I think it’s still important to create what you naturally create. I think it makes you better as a human being and as an artist.

MR: Excellent. Now what’s your advice to yourself?

BT: I think probably the number one best piece of advice for myself, and it’s so hard to do, is to ignore the comments of the now millions and millions of critics. Now with social networks everyone has an opinion and if you rub them the wrong way there’s not anything you can do about what they’re going to say. There’s seriously nothing you can do. So in other words, if they’ve got a bee up their ass about you, let’s say you say something stupid in public and it gets on the news, what an ass you are, if you apologize publicly, which has become a popular thing–“I’ll apologize to everyone”–they’ll say, “Oh, he only did that to help his career.” If you don’t apologize, then you’re an asshole for not apologizing. In other words, I’m trying to learn that there’s not a thing I can do about the people that hate me on the internet. Nothing.

As an artist, you’re sensitive by nature, and probably a little unbalanced, so it gets to you more. I’m trying to learn how to not let my oversensitive nature overtake me and make me stick my head back in the cave and not want to put myself out there. You have to do it. There are a lot of people out there who suffer from this. A lot of people have made comments like this throughout history but I think Jonathan Swift said something like, “…if what a certain writer observes be true, that when a great genius appears in the world, the dunces are all in confederacy against him.” I think you just have to get used to the fact that you’re doing what you love and what you feel and you are at least doing it, so anybody who’s willing to stick their neck out–and I don’t care if it’s the silliest part on the silliest sitcom out there or the deepest Marlon Brando performance out there–both of those people have something in common. Both of them were willing to try.

In that sense, you can’t separate anybody in the entertainment business, no matter if they’re a lightweight or real heavy. If you make a silly, syrupy pop record or you make some masterpiece like Dark Side Of The Moon, the one thing those two have in common is that they both put their necks out of the cave. They’re both willing to do something, so you end up being talked about by people who are not doing anything. We have to pay attention to the people who do, not the people who talk about the people who do. That’s the biggest lesson for me.

MR: Wow. So are you looking forward to the tour as a way to get your head fully back into music for a while?

BT: Yeah, I really am looking forward to it, especially since I’m going out with Brad and Teddy and J.D.. They’re my friends. I don’t have a lot of close friends, I have a lot of acquaintances, but I’m going to be out there on a bus with guys who are my friends and who I spend time with anyway. There’s a certain family camaraderie there. The only bad thing about touring is it’s not a good place for the kids, on the bus and everything. My daughter Bella is now ten. She’s going to be eleven in September and I’m going to miss her a lot. It’s thirty five days, but thirty five days when they’re ten is a big deal. That’s the hardest part of touring. On a movie, it’s different, we just got back from New Mexico and the family went with me because you’re in one spot. On this you just can’t do it. And we’re not spring chickens, either. It’s not like when we were younger. I used to rodeo and I could sleep in the front of a truck while some guy’s driving. It’s not like that anymore. We all try to take all of our vitamins and get ready to go.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

A Conversation with The Boxmasters’ J.D. Andrew

Mike Ragogna: J.D.! You good?

JD Andrew: I’m good! I’m trying to shake the nerves of getting ready to go on tour. I haven’t had a tour where I left my kids for longer than four or five days, so that’s a little nerve wracking right now. Last time I didn’t have any kids when we went so I didn’t have to worry about it.

MR: What’s it like juggling your music duty and being a new dad?

J.D.: Most of the time it’s not too bad. Billy sold his house a couple of years ago, so we don’t have the studio in the house anymore, so we don’t work six days a week fifteen hours a day anymore. If I had the kids and we were still doing that schedule I would probably shoot myself. It’s a lot easier time now, we just go and record when we have some songs or have some time. It’s a lot more relaxing, especially when the kids don’t sleep at night.

MR: So this new album is a double CD, which is pretty ambitious. How did you approach this one? You recorded it progressively over the last few years, right?

J.D.: Mostly. This one was done mostly at Henson studios, some of it was done over at Billy’s house previously, but it started in about 2013 sometime. Brad and Billy wrote “This Game Is Over” and “Sometimes There’s A Reason.” I would call those two songs the touchstones for at least the first CD. They’re all original, both CDs. The first one is kind of more rock ‘n’ roll and jangly sixties country rock stuff and the second one is more of the moody singer-songwriter stuff, more like Billy’s Beautiful Door record, using his Warren Zevon influences and doing that sort of thing. I would say three quarters of this stuff was all done in the past two or three years. Some of it is from five years ago. When we initially met with 101 Ranch they were like, “Give us a record! We want to put it out.” We had so much back catalog material and records finished we initially started just picking songs from everything but we said, “We really want to keep these other records together and release those as they are at some point,” so we said, “Why don’t we just do a double record?” and the label went, “Sure, why not?” That was in some ways easier for us, to concentrate on two different sounds, the two different things that we do rather than figure out how to mix the two together.

MR: How has the band evolved sonically?

J.D.: The other projects were more hyper-stylized. We were really going for the combination of the early sixties/hillbilly/British invasion stuff. We made very definite guidelines on what were going to do, what we weren’t going to do, what equipment we would use, things like that. As we’ve evolved we’ve evolved into playing how we play naturally. It’s still got all of those sixties influences, it’s just a little more–I don’t even want to say “modern,” it’s just a little more relaxed in its stringency to those kinds of rules that we set before. It’s kind of jangly rock ‘n’ roll.

MR: So it’s like Boxmasters 2.0.?

J.D.: Yeah. Brad Davis is playing lead guitar on this stuff, we had another guy on those first couple of records. Not that they do a lot of things differently, it just is a version two. Brad Davis and Teddy Andreadis are now official Boxmaster members. We’re a four-piece as far as documentation goes. We’ve got six guys on the road. It’s just become more of a straight rock ‘n’ roll band at times with crazy moody psychedelic stuff in it.

MR: How are you going to perform this project on the road? And what have you learned from being on the road that you’re now applying to Boxmasters’ music?

J.D.: We’ve always kind of been a straight-ahead rock ‘n’ roll band on the road. We sound big, we play loud. Right now it’s two electric guitars, an organ, a bass player, a drummer, and Billy’s out front and we just try to fill it up, but this time we are doing some shows at smaller venues where we’re going to do a slightly more stripped-down version of ourselves where there’s some acoustic guitars and some stools, which we’ve never really done before. We’re going to play some of these songs where we get more moody and slow.

MR: J.D., what have you found Billy’s favorite environment for a Boxmasters show to be?

J.D.: Billy wants a big show. He wants a place where we can have a good light show. Basically the thing he doesn’t want to do in any place, no matter how big or small, is he doesn’t want to look like a bar band. We work really hard on putting these shows together and we want that to come across. There’s lighting and projections and fun stuff going on, we want a sound system that will actually play above the band so it sounds big. When he does these really moody songs, he sings in his low register and he’s got a very resonant voice, so sometimes you need a system to get it to come out. When you’re kind of whispering it’s hard to get it out to the people.

MR: How about you? What are your favorite kinds of venues?

J.D.: My favorite places that we’ve played have been punk clubs. I like to sound like The Replacements live. Basically, “Let’s have a train wreck and have a lot of fun doing it!” At the same time, we want the songs to have starts and endings that actually start and end together and not just devolve into chaos. But I like them to all be faster than they probably should be, and louder and trashier. That’s just my personal preference. We’re a tight band, we’ve got really good players, it’s a lot of fun to play with the guys.

MR: Do you prefer recording or performing more?

J.D.: I have so much freedom in the recording process as far as how we sound. That’s what I do. That’s my initial hat that I think of. Playing live is fun, but then I have to worry about how fat I am and getting up in front of people and looking like a complete loser. That’s the part I worry about.

MR: When you’re recording are you considering having to play these songs live?

J.D.: No, we don’t tend to think about that at all. When we recorded most of these songs, it wasn’t until August or September of last year that we were really thinking of putting these together as a record. Anything we’ve recorded was just because we felt like recording it. Billy’s like, “As long as I can get in the studio every few weeks or once a month I’m fine. Otherwise, I lose my mind.” Everything is just recorded as we feel at the time. There’s no other outside influences like playing live or anything. The tempos are whatever is right for him to sing to and the rest of the instrumentation is mostly whatever our strengths are. I play the jangly stuff, Brad plays the fancy lead guitar stuff, Teddy does the keyboards and Billy’s the drummer, that’s it. Whatever fits whatever song is being done at that time is what we do.

MR: Do you have a couple of favorites on the project?

J.D.: I think every one of us would agree that “This Game Is Over” is one of our favorite songs, sonically, lyrically, vocally. It’s just really a great song. Another one of my favorites is “Somewhere Down The Road,” the last song and the title song of the record. That’s a song that was initially on another project we were kind of working out, kind of a concept record that we haven’t finished yet, so it just made sense that that song would go in this new batch. It’s one of the few songs that I actually remember writing. We wrote so many songs that I don’t remember the actual genesis of, but for some reason I remember when we wrote “Somewhere Down The Road” and how we did it. I’m trying to go down the list in my head. “Young Man’s Game” is my favorite one on the second side.

MR: I love that the concept of “sides” of a record has expanded into meaning two CDs.

J.D.: [laughs] Yeah.

MR: Which side would you listen to casually?

J.D.: I would probably drive to the first one and put the second one on at my house to do work. They’re just two different moods. The first one is much more of an exciting record for doing upbeat things and the other one’s a little more for doing introspective things.

MR: How has the writing experience evolved for you guys?

J.D.: We’ve done eight or ten songs since that record has been finished and we’re actually working more as a quartet on writing some of these songs. Most of the time, Billy will either have a chord or two that he’s plinked out on the guitar and maybe he has a lyric idea, he might have a whole lyric written. Some of the time, I have a whole track started or completely finished, other times I’ll just have some sort of riff idea. Really it comes from anything that gives us inspiration. It doesn’t take a lot, really, it’s just a couple of chords that make us perk up and go, “Hey, that’s something!” Then we’ll turn it into a song. Teddy brings all of his piano chords into the mix, so we’re trying to incorporate more of that along into what we do because it just gives it a little bit more different stuff. All that equals inspiration.

MR: Do you feel like the permanent addition of keyboard has shifted the focus of your approach?

J.D.: It’s not going to end up being a big sonic shift, it’s just anything that gives us an inspiration. Teddy can add a couple of different weird chords into things. That’s what we’re always going for, just evolving into more weird chords.

MR: Does Billy’s schedule as an actor ever conflict with the band’s schedule?

J.D.: He says, “Let’s tour in April” and that’s when we go. Any time we have something band-related that’s going on that’s important he just tells his film manager that this is what we’re going to do. It’s not a lucrative position for him, but a lot of times they can reschedule. We haven’t had to deal with that before, because he wasn’t making a lot of movie projects for quite a while, which gave us years of constant recording. This is the first time he might actually have a bunch of projects going on. We’ve all got stuff going on, Brad’s got his own studio in Texas, he’s got to take time to close the place down and postpone projects, and Teddy’s always on the road playing with someone. I hang out with my kids most of the time when I’m not working with Billy. It’s good.

MR: So this has evolved in a good way for you all, time-wise.

J.D.: Yeah, everybody has other things they do. It’s just a matter of, “Hey, are you available this time?” “Yeah, I am,” “Great, let’s get together and do something.” It’s not the other three of us sitting around and going, “Man, I can’t wait until we can tour again.” It’s whenever it’s good for all of us. We’re excited to make it all happen.

MR: J.D., what advice do you have for new artists?

JD: My advice is to not chase whatever trend is going on and try to sound like everyone else. Take the people you are inspired by and start digging into who inspired them, and then find out who inspired them. Get back to the root of the music that you love. It might surprise you as to what was the genesis for somebody else’s inspiration. I’m sure Billy will say this too–learn your history. There’s so much of it that’s being lost, we have to hold on to it and learn it and teach it to others. Use that history and use it to inspire you to make music that is personal to yourself and not just whatever the next hot thing is that’s going to get you on American Idol.

MR: Nice. Do you think that’s what people are taking away when they listen to a Boxmasters project?

J.D.: I hope so. They should know that it’s heavily influenced by the past. We’re trying to bring it to new audiences, especially with the older cover stuff. Bring it to new audiences who might say, “I really like that song by Webb Pierce, I want to go listen to more of that,” and then they go and find Del Reeves or Merle Haggard or The Boxtops or anybody like that. Find things that are inspiring and might lead them to new creative heights.

MR: Musically, is there anything out there that surprises you anymore?

J.D.: I constantly feel like an idiot because there’s so much stuff that I haven’t heard. I hang out with Brad and Billy and Teddy and they are insane in their knowledge. It makes me feel like I don’t know anything. It makes me feel like I have to be constantly learning and looking into doing other things so I don’t feel like a complete idiot. These guys know so much history, it’s inspiring. Everyone really is influenced at their core level by other things. Brad grew up as a bluegrasser, Teddy grew up more of a rock ‘n’ roll, R&B kind of guy, Detroit via New Jersey. I’m also a little bit younger than those guys, I started learning a little bit later than them. Even though I was years behind my time I haven’t caught up. I’ve still got a lot to learn.

MR: What kind of a legacy do you want The Boxmasters to have?

J.D.: Basically I want people to listen to the music and read the lyrics and see that there’s a whole lot going on. Some of it’s poppy, bouncy, good time-sounding stuff but there’s really deep thoughts and stories and things going on that are a lot deeper than they might think. I want people to know, “Hey, that’s Billy singing,” he really is a great vocalist, a great storyteller, and all those crazy girl harmonies that you’re hearing in there, that’s him, too. I think I’m the boring underneath stuff that’s not the stuff you listen to and go, “Wow, that’s fantastic,” but he does all the high stuff that I can’t even reach anyway. There’s a lot going on in these records even if it just sounds like some guys bashing away. And it’s all played, there’s not machines going on. This is all how they used to make records in the old days. That’s what we do. We don’t use tracks live, we just play songs. That’s why we crash and burn at times.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

******************************

LINES WEST’S “PERFECT PAIR” EXCLUSIVE

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photo credit: Ryker Kallas

According to Brian Larney…

“Lately, John and I have been talking a lot about some of the great songs of the late 60s and 70s a la Badfinger or Paul McCartney. The sound of those records and the song craft on them is just mind blowing. In every song there’s a killer hook! I had the idea of “Perfect Pair” kicking around for a while and it seemed to just beg for an arrangement that reflected our enthusiasm for that sound.”

Lyrically, it’s really about a pedestal and a plea. I can remember a few times finding myself in one of those -the quintessential unrequited situations yet I remain an optimist. The song ends with ‘I can take you anywhere. We’re two of a perfect pair’…I guess I’m just hopeless.”

******************************

DOUG BURR’S “NEVER GONNA BE YOUNG AGAIN” EXCLUSIVE

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photo courtesy Tell All Your Friends PR

According to Doug Burr…

“We wanted this one to be jangly, Buddy Holly sounding. The music is kind of at odds with the story on this one–which is nothing new in the folk music world of course, the idea of a soldier living through war. Musically it stands out a bit on the record, but the subject matter was spot-on, and that song had received such strong audience response when playing it live. I’d been including that one in some live shows, since about 2012. So it felt like it needed to be a part of this record.”


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