The Billionaire Who Bought Trump’s Mansion Faces Scrutiny in Monaco

Dmitry Rybolovlev, a Russian mining magnate, is suspected of using perks to curry favor with officials, who arrested a businessman he is feuding with.
NYT > Arts

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Fake five-star reviews being bought and sold online

A trade in false online reviews relied upon by millions is identified in a BBC investigation.
BBC News – Technology

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Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

John Oliver Bought An Ad On ‘Hannity’ To Teach Basic Math To Trump

The catheter cowboy is back with an important message.
Comedy
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material culture: Who Bought Sylvia Plath’s Stuff?

A tartan kilt, fishing rod and dragon pendant were among items auctioned recently by the poet’s daughter, Frieda Hughes.
NYT > Fashion & Style

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Tribeca Winner ‘Keep the Change’ Bought by Kino Lorber (EXCLUSIVE)

Kino Lorber has acquired all North American rights to the romantic comedy “Keep the Change,” written and directed by Rachel Israel, Variety has learned exclusively. “Keep the Change,” starring newcomers Brandon Polansky and Samantha Elisofon, won the Tribeca Film Festival’s awards for Best U.S. narrative feature and best new narrative director last year along with […]

Variety

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After His Wife’s Death, Man Still Uses The Last Coffee Can She Bought

“When he runs out, he puts his new coffee into the old can and never changes spoons.”
Weddings
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John Oliver Bought 5 Presidential Wax Dummies And Made The Weirdest Movie Ever

Warren G. Harding gets his long-awaited biopic. Sort of.
Comedy
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Walmart Just Bought Bonobos for $310 Million. But Will It Pay Off?

The megastore is hoping to entice the “urban millenial customer.”

Style – Esquire

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Google robotics business bought by Japanese firm

Technology giant Softbank is going to buy Boston Dynamics, the robotics company currently owned by Google’s parent company.
Tech News – Latest Technology and Gadget News | Sky News

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Theranos Secretly Bought Outside Lab Gear, Ran Fake Tests

An investor said in newly unsealed court filings that Theranos used a shell company to buy commercial-lab equipment, then pretended it was using its own technology in demonstrations for prospective partners and investors.
WSJ.com: US Business

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After His Wife’s Death, Man Still Uses The Last Coffee Can She Bought

When his wife of 41 years died of skin cancer in 2012, David Hoskins packed up and moved in with his daughter to nearby Hazard, Kentucky.

Hoskins didn’t take much with him, but he kept two things: the last can of coffee his wife Karen bought before she got sick and the spoon she used to stir her coffee every morning. 

Five years later, the 66-year-old widow still uses both every day. 

“Looking at that picture of him with his coffee can, you’d never know that that’s all he has left of her,” his daughter Kim Hoskins Fields wrote in a now-viral Facebook post shared on the page Love What Matters on Saturday. “Because that’s how they always started their day was with coffee, and so each day he starts his day with my mama.”

In an interview with The Huffington Post, Hoskins Fields said the spoon and the Maxwell House coffee canister ― which her dad refills when it starts to get low ― are sacred items in her home.

“When he moved in his things, he told me to never throw the can away and to never touch the spoon inside of it,” she said. “He didn’t want it mixed up with my other spoons.” 

“I kind of laughed and asked him why,” Hoskins Fields said. “He explained that it was all he kept because it made him feel close to her, like she was still there each morning.” 

The couple had six kids during their marriage (two from Hoskin’s previous marriage), so couple-time was often in short supply. Every morning, though, they made time for coffee. 

“Even when I was little and she went to work super early he would get up with her and have a cup,” their daughter said. 

Karen’s diagnosis of melanoma in October 2012 came out of nowhere and he grappled with the news, according to his daughter. Two months later, Karen died.

“When she was dying, he made himself sick with worry and tried to save her,” Hoskins Fields said. “He begged and pleaded with God. He would have traded anything, gave anything or done anything to save her.” 

These days, coffee is all Hoskins needs to remember his late wife. 

“He says he has all the pictures and memories he wants in his mind,” she said. “He kept what he knew would make him feel the closest to her.” 

type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Stories + articlesList=58a3c063e4b094a129f061ea,58dd6a62e4b08194e3b88238,57b1d451e4b0e7935e057360,58011570e4b06e04759498f4

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Weddings – The Huffington Post
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Prince’s unreleased song stash bought up

Prince’s unreleased demos, outtakes and live recordings are set for release after Universal bought up exclusive rights.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

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This Woman Bought Nothing for an Entire Year and Saved $23,000

Here’s how the “no-spend year” changed her life.

Lifestyle – Esquire

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Amazon has to pay for those apps your kids bought

Good news: you might be getting some cash from Amazon soon. A federal judge today ruled that Amazon is liable for failing to warn consumers that free-to-play apps weren’t exactly free when users downloaded them. One of the worst offenders was the Smurf’s Village app for Apple’s iOS, which let users purchase in-game berries for as much as $ 100 at a time.

Yahoo Tech

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Why I Just Bought a Used Car Online — and Why You Should, Too

Like a lot of sane people, I hate buying cars. I hate shopping for them. I hate dickering on price. I hate the test drives during which the salesperson prattles on about the car’s wonderful features while nervously eyeing the speedometer.

Yahoo Tech

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The Couple Who Bought and Cleaned Out a Hoarder’s House to Create a Dream Home

A fixer-upper of epic proportions.

Lifestyle – Esquire

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Kanye West Bought Kim Kardashian ‘A Couple Thousand’ Roses For Mother’s Day

Even though Kim Kardashian is spending Mother’s Day in Brazil, away from husband Kanye West and their 1-year-old daughter, North, the rapper made sure his wife felt appreciated on the special holiday.

The “Keeping Up With The Kardashians” star shared a photo of a room filled with bouquets of white roses to her Instagram account Sunday, writing:

I got to my room in Brazil and my amazing thoughtful husband had the sweetest note with a couple thousand roses covering my entire suite for Mothers Day! I’m so sad I’m so far away on this day but happy we celebrated yesterday! I love you baby & North soooo much!!!



Sweet? Yes. Over the top? Maybe. Surprising? Not really, especially considering what the rapper got for Kardashian on this day last year:


The 34-year-old reality TV star made sure to post tributes to her mother and grandmother to commemorate the occasion. See all the photos below:


@krisjenner

A photo posted by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on



Happy Mother’s Day to all of the beautiful mothers out there!

A photo posted by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on



For more stars’ beautiful Mother’s Day tributes, head here.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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Woman Who Says She Bought Renoir At Flea Market For $7 Challenged In Court

The question of who owns a tiny Renoir landscape of the River Seine may rest on a four-page handwritten letter penned 78 years ago by a middle-aged woman in a bad mood.

The letter, by the Baltimore art collector Saidie A. May, is reprinted verbatim as part of a 154-page motion for summary judgment filed late Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Eastern Virginia by attorney Marla Diaz on behalf of the Baltimore Museum of Art.

In effect, the motion asks federal Judge Leonie M. Brinkema to determine that the 1879 oil painting “Paysage Bords de Seine” belongs to the Baltimore museum and not to the 51-year-old Virginia woman who says she bought it at a flea market in 2009 for $ 7 as part of a box of odds and ends.

The letter by the then-56-year-old May is dated Oct. 14, 1935. It’s key to the case because it indicates that the heiress owns the tiny painting (framed, it is about the size of a piece of notebook paper) and planned to lend it to her hometown museum. May later bequeathed her art collection — including the Renoir painting — to the Baltimore museum, according to the motion.

May’s missive, replete with underlinings and multiple exclamation points, was written to Roland McKinney, who at the time was the museum’s director. The heiress — one of the art institution’s major benefactors — seems primarily interested in scolding McKinney about the sorry condition of a religious painting in the museum’s possession. (“It was never in such a bad shape and I’m sick about it,” she writes.)

It isn’t until the very bottom of the third page that May gets to the matter that has attracted interest throughout the art world for the past 15 months:

“The Modern Art Museum will be sending you very soon some small paintings of mine which I am willing to loan the Museum indefinitely if you insure them!!”

The second painting she lists as “Au Bord de la Seine” by Renoir next to this price: $ 1,010.

The peacefulness of the Seine scene, depicted on a linen napkin, belies its tumultuous recent history.

The artwork by the French Impressionist master surfaced publicly in September 2012 when Marcia Fuqua, 51, of Lovettsville, Va., who is also known as Martha, said that she bought the artwork from the Harpers Ferry Flea Market in 2009 without being aware that it was an original Renoir.

She said it was her mother, who went by the names Marcia Mae Fuqua and Marcia Fouquet and who had a fine-art background, who urged her to have the painting appraised. Fouqet died Sept. 9 of this year.

The painting was authenticated by The Potomack Company, a Virginia auction house, which estimated the artwork’s value at between $ 75,000 and $ 100,000. An auction was scheduled for two weeks later, and the inquiries began pouring in from potential buyers internationally.

But the day before the painting was to be sold, the Baltimore Museum of Art produced documents indicating that the work had been stolen from what was then known as the Polk Gallery after the museum closed at 6 p.m. Nov. 16, 1951, and before 1 p.m. the following day.

The auction was called off. The FBI seized the painting and has been holding it in secure storage in Manassas, Va., until Judge Brinkema can resolve the ownership question.

For a time, it appeared that the painting’s rightful owner might have been the Fireman’s Fund Insurance Co., which paid the BMA’s $ 2,500 theft claim. However, last month, the insurance company transferred its rights to the artwork to the museum.

Diaz’s motion doesn’t dispute Fuqua’s account of how she came to acquire the oil painting. Or, if any doubt is expressed, it is delicately worded.

“Notwithstanding the ‘Renoir’ plate on the frame of the painting and the paper on the back indicating that it was by Renoir and entitled ‘Paysage Bords de Seine,’ Fuqua did not realize that the painting was an original Renoir at the time of her purchase or in the following years,” the motion reads.

“Even if she did purchase the painting at a flea market without knowledge of its authorship and/or title, her claim must still fail as a matter of law because the painting was stolen from the BMA.”

In Diaz’s motion, she provides documents indicating that the Renoir landscape was exhibited at the Baltimore museum at least twice: in March 1950 as part of an exhibit of the May Collection, and again in November 1951, when it was included in a show titled “From Ingres to Gauguin.”

It was during that show that the painting disappeared.

To bolster her argument, Diaz cites the example of a Tiffany sword dating back to the Civil War that vanished from Brown University sometime between 1974 and 1977. The sword was purchased in 1992 from an Illinois antiques dealer by a couple named Donald and Toni Tharpe.

After Brown discovered the whereabouts of the missing weapon, university officials sued to have the sword returned. The lawsuit was filed in the Eastern District of Virginia — the same district where the Renoir case is pending. Though the Tharpes argued that they had purchased the artifact in good faith, earlier this summer, Magistrate Judge Douglas Miller ruled that the sword belongs to the university and ordered it returned.

In her motion, Diaz argues that the case for the museum’s ownership of the Renoir is even stronger than the winning case presented by Brown University.

Unlike the theft of the sword, which was never fully documented, the Renoir painting was reported to have been stolen within hours after the theft was discovered. Diaz’s motion includes four separate documents alluding to the theft.

She argues that under “well-settled Virginia law” good-faith purchasers of stolen goods are out of luck.

“Ms. Fuqua could not have purchased good title to the painting and does not, therefore, have a valid claim to possession and ownership of the painting,” Diaz’s motion argues. “Her claim to possession and ownership of the painting must be dismissed.”

Fuqua’s attorney, T. Wayne Biggs, declined to comment Tuesday, though he is expected to file a formal response to the motion for summary judgment this month.

A motion for a summary judgment can be granted only if the germane facts in the case aren’t in dispute, if they are so clear-cut that a jury could reach just one possible verdict under the law.

That’s a steep bar for any attorney to surmount — and Fuqua’s attorney has yet to make his client’s case.

But, at a pretrial conference last week, Judge Brinkema might have given a hint as to her thinking. She told the attorneys: “This is a relatively straightforward, simple case. It shouldn’t take much time.”

She will hear oral arguments in the motion on Jan. 10.

mary.mccauley@baltsun.com ___


Arts – The Huffington Post
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