Chalayan Men’s Spring 2020

Easy, cool and lightning-quick.
Hussein Chalayan’s show took place on a little pedestrian street across from his Mayfair store, and the setup was refreshingly simple, with all guests standing, Mother Nature providing the lighting and models carrying their own music, via little boomboxes that came straight from 1986.
There may have been a complex, interesting back story to the clothes — Chalayan is passionate about what he does, and his collections are often underpinned by sociopolitical and historical themes — but the collection itself was a breeze.
There were stripes galore, on suits with ties at the waist and down the leg, on cotton shirts and billowy or flat-front trousers and on collarless tops. Trousers and shorts were rolled at the bottom, some came with flaps or folds, while lightweight shirts were boxy or had rounded shoulders and elbow-skimming sleeves.
Silhouettes were languid and made for hot-weather climes, and Chalayan shaped them with a drawstring here and a snap, knot or buckle there.
While he may have begun with the idea of dance and movement among ethnic groups colonized by Western nations, and about the tensions between indigenous cultures and their occupiers across the centuries, he ended with the most democratic of collections, which should

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Chalayan Pre-Fall 2019

Hussein Chalayan’s collection was filled with beautifully constructed clothes that would fit into any luxury wardrobe: There were asymmetric, lightly draped dresses in striped jersey or dogtooth fabrics; roomy trousers with side pleats or appliquéd panels lightly hanging on the sides; separates in a colorful forest print painted in a Chinese style, and skirts made voluminous with deep, contrasting pleats.
Apart from being a master at draping and creating unique constructions, Chalayan is also curious — and a deep thinker. This season he let his imagination run loose, unpicking the concept of pretending. Every drape, pleat and layer in the new range was informed by his philosophical interpretation of what it means to try to be someone else.
Turning the idea on its head, Chalayan bypassed all the negativity and instead focused on pretending as a catalyst to the imagination or “a medium that can healthily lift us away from our reality, adding richness to the monotony of our lives.” He also broke down the word pre-tension, discovering another alternative meaning of “applying tension to an object before use, to make it stronger.”
Chalayan managed to turn all of that abstraction into reality with clothes inspired by activities that can take the human body away from its

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Hussein Chalayan, Peter Saville Accuse Fashion Corporates of Crushing Creativity

LONDON — How is technology impacting creativity, and what does it really take to disrupt an industry that’s reaching saturation point?
Frieze Academy brought together a series of creatives — ranging from Kim Jones and Hussein Chalayan, to graphics expert Peter Saville and sound designer Michel Gaubert — to argue those questions in a series of talks held at the Royal Academy of Arts on Friday.
Chalayan, one of the first designers to incorporate technology into his work and present moving garments in his famous “Geotropics” collection in 1999, said technology’s impact on the arts hasn’t necessarily been a good thing.
He described wearables as “tacky” and highlighted the growing interest of handcrafted techniques: “It’s such a cliché to be chasing 3-D printing now. I liked it at the beginning, but not anymore, it no longer feels expensive somehow,” Chalayan said.
He also touched on the influence of the Internet and social media, talking about the “sense of entitlement,” that the easy access to data has created in younger generations.
“Are you really learning by Googling something?” he said, adding that social media and the rise of fashion conglomerates have both dampened creativity. Chalayan said  there is less room today to speak up, take risks and

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Chalayan Comes Home to London

CHANNEL HOP: London Fashion Week isn’t just a hotbed of emerging talent. Established designers have their place, too. After 16 years of showing his women’s wear collections in Paris, London-based Hussein Chalayan returned to London to show his Chalayan fall 2017 collection on Saturday.
After the show, which he presented at Sadler’s Wells Theater (a venue he’s used in the past, and the site of a collaboration with a contemporary dance company last year) Chalayan laid out his reasons for coming back.
“We left London, as we felt we were making this very big effort…but a lot of people weren’t coming to London at that time. And we felt for business we had to go to Paris – and when we moved to Paris our business grew considerably,” he said. “These days it’s different. You have to remember that digital media, the whole thing, was not as developed as it is now – it was a different life.”
Chalayan also showed his first men’s runway collection in January during London Fashion Week Men’s. And in 2015, the designer debuted a sleek store on Mayfair’s Bourdon Street. Asked whether he’ll continue to show his women’s collection in London, the designer was noncommittal.
“I don’t know

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Chalayan Pre-Fall 2017

For pre-fall, Hussein Chalayan pondered the concept of the new individual and her needs.
“I was looking at the idea of how the Ancient Greeks were revived in the 19th century by Lord Byron,” said Chalayan, “and how the whole sense of personhood was redefined by northwestern Europeans. Then I looked at this idea of how the corporate world is shaping the way we present ourselves, and how Greek ideas have been reappropriated now.”
He sent a conceptual lineup of jackets, coats, dresses, trousers and blouses filled with Greek-inspired ideas that felt relaxed and luxurious for the modern working wardrobe.
Dresses and tailored shirting were interestingly constructed with frocks featuring scarves that can be worn as a scarf or draped. He developed sleeves into sashes, which playfully decorated a navy button-down shirt as the cotton material was draped and twisted diagonally across the bodice. The detail embellishment was also seen in a black-and-white button-down stretch cotton shirt, for which loose material was wound up around the waist and worn over a black wool skirt with the same wrap detail.
His Grecian take was translated into luxurious outerwear as seen in a waistcoat, which was tucked under a gray cashmere wool jacket.
Elsewhere, loose proportions drooped on generously

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