Mia Becar Launches With Direct-to-Consumer Business Model to Sell Footwear

SURE-FOOTED: The direct-to-consumer footwear company Mia Becar is up and running.
The West Hollywood-based company was started by Betzabe “Betsy” Gonzalez and Carolina Lujan. Aiming to establish repeat customers, Mia Becar will offer monthly drops of capsule collections to try to keep shoppers coming back. The shoes retail from $ 575 to $ 875. “We thought this was the future of a luxury shoe brand. We want to keep the brand fresh. We also wanted to be able to control our message and our story.”
Gonzalez and Lujan were both born in Mexico and they studied shoe design and graduated from Arsutoria School in Milan in 2017. Their debut collection was inspired by the Golden Age of Hollywood and features such looks as D’Orsat pumps, peep-toe mules and stiletto booties.
Married to former New York Mets player Adrian Gonzalez, Betsy has lived in different cities over the years due to his Major League Baseball career. On the road, she noticed a need “for brands that supported noble causes, elevated women and held themselves to the highest standards.” Motivated partially by the belief that “good shoes simply make life better,” she and her cofounder Lujan visited numerous factories in Italy before starting their Italian-made footwear brand.

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Idris Elba Plays Off Music With Direct-to-Consumer Label 2HR Set, Relays Anticrime Message

ELBA IS ALL SET: In the halls of Hollywood, Idris Elba is a premier force, but the ambidextrous actor has added fashion designer to his professional pursuits.
Building off the success of the U.K. launch of his clothing label 2HR Set, the Golden Globe- and SAG-winning actor, director, producer and musician has officially dropped his apparel collection. The name for the unisex line was inspired by his interest in music and the DJ culture. He polished that talent growing up in London’s East End. DJs generally have a two-hour window during a gig to do their best work. In a statement Elba spoke of riffing on that idea, “A two-hour set is the acid test for a DJ. But for me, I’ve taken this idea a step further. Whether I’m behind the decks on stage, in the gym, or studying a new script, I’ll give myself two hours and really get stuff done. It’s my window to go for it, get it done, and get it done well.”
The collection consists of hoodies, crewneck sweatshirts, long-sleeved T-shirts and other machine-washable basics. There are also collaborative styles with the British DJ, musician and record producer Fatboy Slim. Retail prices range from $ 49 for

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Linda Farrow, Hourglass and Shopify Plus on the Direct-to-Consumer Mentality

LONDON — That old adage about the customer always being right rings true for many digital companies that are putting the customer at the center of all that they do — and getting results.
Direct-to-consumer sales were the focus of a Shopify conference, Commerce+, in London this week as brands took to the stage to speak about the importance of putting the customer first and finding personalized marketing solutions.
“Commerce is changing faster than we’ve ever seen before, the growth of direct-to-consumer particularly has been incredible to watch. We’re seeing brands that are very young actually growing at incredible rates and in many cases past more of the traditional retailers,” said Shimona Mehta, head of EMEA at Shopify, the online commerce platform.
Jennifer Heath, e-commerce manager at Linda Farrow, said that putting the customer first has helped the eyewear brand to grow.
“We’ve tried affiliate marketing, and that hasn’t worked the way we hoped, what did work was direct mail and understanding that our customer, who will pay a premium price for our products, appreciates getting look books,” she said.
Candice Chan, director of e-commerce and digital at Hourglass Cosmetics, said listening to the consumer has helped the company find the right marketing approach.
“We’ve tried

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Nary Manivong Returns to the Fashion Scene With a Direct-to-Consumer Signature Collection

TIME FOR A SECOND ACT: After a four-year hiatus, Nary Manivong is back on the scene with a direct-to-consumer signature collection.
The designer decided to hit the reset button, even leaving New York for the better part of 2014, before returning. Interestingly, Manivong said he didn’t jump at the opportunity to start his own label when Handa Fashion’s Jack Shi presented the idea. The duo have known each other professionally for 10 years, but their partnership evolved over time. Not wanting to rush back into fashion full time, the conversation played out over 18 months during which Shi offered to provide all the production services for his signature label at no cost.
Manivong now occupies a floor that serves as a factory, sample room and showroom in a West 35th Street building. His capsule collection — three dresses, a skirt and six tops — will be sold online direct-to-consumer starting Thursday. Aiming to be strategic with his growth plan, he wants to find the right retail partner initially rather than multiple ones. Retail prices will range from $ 400 to $ 900 with the higher-end of the spectrum made from Laotian textiles. The Ohio-born designer took the 19-hour flight there earlier this year to meet many relatives for the

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The Last Line Launches Direct-to-Consumer Fine Jewelry Online

The latest entrant in the online, direct-to-consumer fine jewelry arena, Los Angeles-based The Last Line, launching today, aims to be first among many companies offering baubles for female self-purchasers.
Founder Shelley Gibbs Sanders, who designed for celebrity jewelry lines and high-end brands in L.A. for 15 years, is bringing her point of view to what she considers an “over-flooded market.”
“We [she and husband Teddy Sanders] found two holes in the market: there were not a lot of well-designed and high-quality staples, and nothing that felt heirloom, like when it was handmade in the Fifties and Sixties,” she said.
Hence, the decision to offer a two-part collection, called Heart (the staples) and Soul (modern heirlooms). Ranging in price from $ 60 to $ 1,500 and $ 1,000 to $ 7,000, respectively, the two ranges are targeted at women who are just starting to build a fine jewelry collection as well as seasoned shoppers seeking something new.
Like Iconery, Noémie, Aurate and Vrai & Oro, The Last Line can pass on significant savings for expensive products with the direct-to-consumer business model. Gibbs Sanders can also gather customer feedback and react quickly with pieces made in Los Angeles. The site will launch with two drops of earrings, followed by necklaces, bracelets

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