R Kelly documentary premiere evacuated after threats

The NYPD confirms that “no shots were fired and the investigation is ongoing”.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:


‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor,’ ‘RBG’ Among Cinema Eye Honors Early Documentary Awards Nominees

Cinema Eye Honors revealed the first awards announcements for the organization’s 12th annual awards on Thursday. Audience choice nominees include recent documentary awards-circuit players such as “Free Solo,” “Minding the Gap,” “Quincy,” “RBG,” and “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” The group also unveiled its list of “The Unforgettables,” honoring notable and significant nonfiction film subjects, […]

Variety

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

5 Highlights From Queen Elizabeth II Documentary That Features Meghan Markle and Prince Harry

Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Harry, Meghan MarkleMeghan Markle and Prince Harry make special appearances in the new Queen Elizabeth II documentary, Queen of the World.
The special focuses on the U.K.’s 92-year-old ceremonial monarch…

E! Online (US) – TV News

SPECIAL TIP UPDATE!

Kate Middleton Documentary Gets Odd Placement on Netflix

A Netflix doc on the royal family goes viral over its connection to some escorts. Watch the "Live From E!" hosts react!
E! Online Videos

SHOPPING TIP UPDATE!

New Documentary Examines ‘Truth and Lies’ in Deadly 1993 Waco Siege

It’s often described as the worst debacle in federal law enforcement history.

In February of 1993, federal authorities, suspecting the Branch Davidian religious cult of weapons violations, attempted to raid the group’s compound outside Waco, Texas. The initial operation ended in gunfire — and the deaths of four government agents and six Branch Davidians.

A highly-publicized, 51-day standoff ensued between the cult members, led by their 33-year-old leader, David Koresh, and the FBI and ATF. On April 19, 1993, the FBI launched an assault and initiated a tear gas attack on the compound, and soon after, a fire engulfed the compound and led to the deaths of 76 Branch Davidians, including Koresh.

The ill-fated siege is the subject of a new documentary, Truth and Lies: Waco, which airs Thursday, Jan. 4 (9 to 11 p.m. ET) on ABC.

After the siege, the government’s confusing — some would say misleading — disclosure of key facts gave rise to conspiracy theories, including those from far-right movements that cite the event as a reason for their distrust of government.

• Want to keep up with the latest crime coverage? Click here to get breaking crime news, ongoing trial coverage and details of intriguing unsolved cases in the True Crime Newsletter.

Through interviews with FBI and ATF agents about the tactics used during the standoff, the documentary delves into the specifics of what went wrong.

• For more compelling true crime coverage, follow our Crime magazine on Flipboard.

Filmmakers also interview survivors of the fire and children of cult members who discuss the impact of those events and Koresh himself, an infamous figure in American history.

Born into a troubled household to a teenage mother, Koresh turned to religion and joined the Branch Davidian church, a splinter group of the Seventh Day Adventists. He proclaimed himself a prophet and the leader of the group, and in that role, he exercised total control over cult members, abusing them both physically and sexually.

Koresh’s message to his followers was apocalyptic: He told them the end of the world was imminent — and that the U.S. government would fatally attack the Branch Davidians.

Truth and Lies: Waco, airs Thursday, Jan. 4 (9 to 11 p.m. ET) on ABC.


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

With…Sheila Nevins: The Grande Dame of Documentary is Leaving Her Home at HBO

After almost 40 years, she has reels of memorable film, a pile of awards and plenty of perspective on the current battle of the sexes.
NYT > Fashion & Style

SPECIAL ONLINE DEALS!

Kenneth Cole Productions, Inc.

Sarah Jessica Parker to Narrate Bill Cunningham Documentary

Sarah Jessica Parker has been tapped to narrate “The Times of Bill,” a feature-length documentary about the late New York Times photographer and fashion historian. In addition, artist and illustrator Ruben Toledo has created the animations for the film while legendary model Pat Cleveland’s sole recorded song, “Tonight, Josephine” serves as the film’s theme song.

Sarah Jessica Parker and Bill Cunningham 

The film is written and directed by Mark Bozek and produced by Bozek and Live Rocket cofounder Russell Nuce. Live Rocket, a New York-based entertainment and commerce company, just completed its first global collaboration with Apple to promote “The Times of Bill,” the company’s first project. The tour, part of Apple’s “Today at Apple” retail programming initiatives, included curated events in New York, San Francisco, London, Paris, Tokyo and Singapore.

“The Times of Bill” poster by Ruben Toledo. 

On the day Cunningham died 18 months ago, Bozek went into his basement and retrieved a 25-year-old interview he did with the photographer. The interview, which Bozek conducted when he was 27 years old and producing a fashion segment for television, was supposed to last “just 10 minutes.” Hours later, Cunningham was still talking — passionately and unabashedly — about his unprecedented focus on what

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
Milanoo.com Ltd

Lady Gaga ‘hasn’t seen’ her own Netflix documentary

The singer says she has not yet watched Gaga: Five Foot Two, which debuts on Netflix this month.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:


Dior Hosts Screening of Three-Hour Documentary on Founder

EPIC TALE: Christian Dior hosted a screening on Monday for “Christian Dior, la France,” a documentary about its founder released to coincide with the house’s 70th anniversary.
Directed by Frédéric Mitterrand, former culture minister, author, documentary maker and nephew of former French president François Mitterrand, the two-part film tells the story of Dior’s life from his childhood in Normandy to his international fame as creator of the New Look in 1947.
“The film is three hours long. It tells the story of Dior’s life from the inside, I believe, and attempts to explain the extraordinary personality of this shy, reserved man who avoided press and whose artistic life was brief, since he wore himself out with work and died after 10 years of designing,” the filmmaker said.

A screengrab from “Christian Dior, la France.” 
SK Médias

The film delves into Dior’s brief career as a composer, his beginnings as an art gallerist, his private life and his relationships with artists, stars and fashion personalities such as Jean Cocteau, Christian Bérard, Marlene Dietrich, Alexander and Tatiana Liberman and Carmel Snow.
“He comes across as a total genius, and at the same time a man of great moral fiber, infinite kindness and extraordinary courage and ability,” Mitterrand told the

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
TideBuy Black Friday Sale 90% Off+ Extra Coupon

Ohio’s Drag And Trans Performers Dazzle In New Documentary

An acclaimed new documentary is putting the drag kings, drag queens and transgender performers of Columbus, Ohio in the national spotlight.

The Huffington Post got an advance look at “Kings, Queens, & In-Betweens,” which opened in select theaters March 3, with an exclusive clip that can be viewed above. In it, the documentary’s subjects explain the challenges of navigating queer nightlife in the Buckeye State. “Being embraced by straight people has not only challenged their viewpoints, but it’s also challenged ours,” one man says. Adds another: “I think [nightlife] really breaks down, little by little, every bit of stereotyping there is.”

Columbus boasts a queer-friendly, if unassuming, reputation; though New York and San Francisco dwarf it for scope, the city ranked 15th in a 2015 Gallup poll in regard to U.S. cities with the highest LGBTQ populations. As a whole, however, the Midwest has consistently leaned conservative. That dichotomy piqued the interest of director Gabrielle Burton, who was particularly fascinated by Columbus’s “incredible, thriving” drag scene.

“It’s obviously unexpected and surprising to a lot of people… that this is happening in the middle of the Midwest,” Burton, who runs Five Sisters Productions, a film production company, with her four real-life sisters, told The Huffington Post. “There are a lot of assumptions that people make about [LGBTQ] issues or certain types of people, that they’re only in big coastal cities. That’s just not true… If they’re here, they’re going to be everywhere, and that’s something we have to acknowledge as a country.”

“Kings, Queens, & In-Betweens” took Burton six years to complete. “I wanted it to only be in the voice of the performers,” the director, who opted against using a narrator, said. “I wanted to capture the diversity in the performances and experiences of people here.”  

Given that the LGBTQ community is facing an uncertain future under President Donald Trump, Burton said she ultimately hopes her film “can contribute, in some way, to the importance of remembering that everyone is human and everyone is deserving of equal human rights.”

“I hope that people will come to see the film and then enter into conversation with more of a sense of respect and compassion for all people, whatever their identity, sexuality or biology,” Burton, whose next project will explore the relationship between parenting and gender identity, told HuffPost. “Our base line should be that all humans deserve equal rights, and hopefully that film can contribute to that in some way.”

“Kings, Queens, & In-Betweens” opened in New York and Columbus, Ohio on March 3, with screenings that include appearances by cast members. In addition, the film will be available on iTunes and other streaming platforms March 7. 

Like what you see? Don’t miss the Queer Voices newsletter.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

See A Sneak Peak Of Showtime’s Documentary About How The Hell Trump Got Elected

It’s Donald Trump’s first week in the White House, and already there’s a documentary chronicling how he got there. Premiering this week at the Sundance Film Festival, “Trumped: Inside the Greatest Political Upset of All Time” outlines our new president’s path from businessman/celebrity to leader of the free world. 

The Huffington Post has an exclusive sneak peek at the documentary above, as well as the film’s poster. “Trumped” will air Feb. 3 on Showtime.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

How the Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds Documentary Bright Lights Changed Its Director

Debbie Reynolds, Carrie Fisher, 1972Apparently directing Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds had the same effect as watching it will.
“I was surprised by how much I fell in love with Carrie and her…

E! Online (US) – TV News

SPECIAL TIP UPDATE!

A&E changes documentary series title to ‘Escaping the KKK’

In this undated photo provided by This Is Just A Test (TIJAT) Media and the A&E Network, peace activist Arno Michaelis, left, speaks with Chris Buckley, the Grand Knighthawk for the North Georgia White Knights, on A&E's documentary series "Generation KKK," which premiers on January 10 at 10 p.m. ET/PT. (TIJAT/A&E via AP)LOS ANGELES (AP) — A&E is changing the name of its eight-part documentary series about the Ku Klux Klan.



Entertainment News Headlines — Yahoo! News

DISCOUNT DEAL UPDATE:

Best Buy Co, Inc.

British Director To Make Houston Documentary

Kevin Macdonald will shoot the first film officially authorised by the singer’s estate since her death in a hotel bath in 2012.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

ENTERTAINMENT SPECIALS:

Daddy King’s Story Told in New Documentary

Daddy King, as Martin Luther King Jr.’s father was known, is the compelling subject of Bayer Mack’s latest documentary, In the Hour of Chaos. The story sheds light on MLK Jr. but as Mack wrote in an email: “The story gives an extraordinary view of American history.”

Who Was Daddy King?

Martin Luther King Sr. (1899-1984) was a Baptist pastor, leading the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta for 44 years. He was also an early leader of the civil rights movement. He served as the head of the Atlanta NAACP and the Civic and Political League, leading a fight for equality in teachers’ salaries in Atlanta. He also was instrumental in helping end the Jim Crow laws in Georgia.

Martin Luther King Jr. joined him in the ministry, serving with his father at the Ebenezer Church. Daddy King was a strong influence on Martin and the entire congregation, teaching that they need not ever back down from what was right. Martin Jr. carried this message to a national and eventually an international audience.

The idea for a documentary about Daddy King was championed by executive producer Frances Presley Rice who thought King Sr.’s story held keys to a more complete understanding of not only Martin Luther King Jr., but also the civil rights movement. Documentary director and producer Bayer Mack joined her for what turned out to be a major undertaking.

In the documentary, audiences will meet Daddy King, a man of strength and compassion who lived through three heart-breaking tragedies in close succession. First there was the tragic assassination of his oldest son, Martin Jr. Then a little over a year later, his younger son, Alfred Daniel (A.D.), died in the family swimming pool in what is thought to have been an accidental drowning. Finally, a little less than five years later, his beloved wife, Alberta known as “Bunch,” was killed by a gunman on a Sunday morning while she sat at her bench in front of the church organ, waiting for the service to begin.

Despite all the pain, Daddy King was able to “keep on keeping on,” because he said, “The Lord’s not done with me yet.” And in the process, King was to continue to shape the country by lending his influence to those who would help African-Americans gain a rightful position in this country. Any politician who was seeking the African-American vote found his way to Daddy King at some point. Prominent among them was Georgia peanut farmer, Jimmy Carter, consulted Daddy King prior to his gubernatorial as well as his run for the presidency.

Daddy King Growing Up

Among the stories told in the documentary are a few from his formative years. Born Michael King in Stockbridge, Georgia, Daddy King’s personality was largely shaped by his devout mother, Delia, who was married to a sharecropper. Delia believed in a bright future for her children. Though father, James, did not attend church with them, Delia took her children with her every week. King, Sr. reported that in church he found peace, and it kept him from being bitter about the injustices he was becoming aware of.

The documentary’s most telling story of this early time period concerned a day when Delia sent her young son with a bucket of milk to share with a neighbor whose cow was no longer producing milk. On his way, the young boy was stopped by a white mill owner who ordered him to immediately go and fetch a pail of water for his men. Martin was frozen at the thought of not doing as his mother asked and tried to respectfully refuse. The mill owner grabbed him by the shirt. The bucket of milk tipped over, and as Martin bent to try to stop its fall, the man kicked and then punched him before Martin could scramble away.

When Martin got home, he was terrified about what his mother would say about his failure to deliver the milk. She asked his story, and to his surprise, she took him by the hand, and the two of them returned to the mill. Delia then confronted the mill owner. When he started to come at her yelling, she caught him off balance, which permitted her to push the man over and pummel his face until his nose spurted blood.

As she stepped back, she said: “You can kill me but if you put a hand on a child of mine, you’ll have to answer for it.” Taking Martin’s hand again, Delia and Martin returned home.

Daddy King: Doing What Is Right

From his mother, Martin learned how important it was to stand up for what was right. When he went on to become a pastor with his father-in-law at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, it gave him a position from which he could reach out to those in power in order to make a difference. Men like Daddy King preceded the civil rights movement, and it was their work that permitted Martin Jr. to springboard to a national and international stage.

The documentary weaves strands of three stories into one. The underpinnings of the documentary are the events of the time — everything from the Atlanta Riots and the disenfranchisement of blacks throughout the South to the era of prohibition and war time. Over this background, there are two more stories — that of Daddy King and the story of Daddy’s influence on Martin Jr.

Part One of In the Hour of Chaos can be viewed on Vimeo for $ 1.99, and it is currently available to subscribers of kweliTV, a documentary channel. It will also air on various local public television stations. There will be a screening in Cleveland on February 19, and Block Starz Music Television will be distributing the DVD via Amazon.

This is the second project on which Bayer Mack and Frances Presley Rice have coordinated. Previously, they produced a film of the first African-American film director, Oscar Micheaux, a contemporary of D.W. Griffith, and a very successful filmmaker in his own right: Oscar Micheaux: Czar of Black Hollywood.

If you would like to receive stories inspirational black leaders during Black History Month, please email me and put “Black Leaders” in the subject line: kate@americacomesalive.com. I’ll add you to the list. There are also multiple stories of leaders such as Valaida Snow, James Reese Europe, and Harlem Hellfighter Henry Lincoln Johnson already on my site: www.americacomesalive.com.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Documentary Film: A Very Short Introduction

Documentary Film: A Very Short Introduction


Documentary film can encompass anything from Robert Flaherty’s pioneering ethnography Nanook of the North to Michael Moore’s anti-Iraq War polemic Fahrenheit 9/11, from Dziga Vertov’s artful Soviet propaganda piece Man with a Movie Camera to Luc Jacquet’s heart-tugging wildlife epic March ofthe Penguins. In this concise, crisply written guide, Patricia Aufderheide takes readers along the diverse paths of documentary history and charts the lively, often fierce debates among filmmakers and scholars about the best ways to represent reality and to tell the truths worth telling. Beginning with an overview of the central issues of documentary filmmaking-its definitions and purposes, its forms and founders-Aufderheide focuses on several of its key subgenres, including public affairs films, government propaganda (particularly the works produced during World War II), historical documentaries, and nature films. Her thematic approach allows readers to enter the subject matter through the kinds of films that first attracted them to documentaries, and it permits her to make connections between eras, as well as revealing the ongoing nature of documentary’s core controversies involving objectivity, advocacy, and bias. Interwoven throughout are discussions of the ethical and practical considerations that arise with every aspect of documentary production. A particularly useful feature of the book is an appended list of “100 great documentaries” that anyone with a serious interest in the genre should see. Drawing on the author’s four decades of experience as a film scholar and critic, this book is the perfect introduction not just for teachers and students but also for all thoughtful filmgoers and for those who aspire to make documentaries themselves. About the Series: Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life’s most interesting topics. Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest co

Price: $
Sold by Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

Iraq Documentary Filmmaker Turns His Lens on the US Prison Pipeline

The above is a work-in-progress for a documentary film about rehabilitative theater with incarcerated young men of color called The Odyssey Project.

“I wanted to tell the story of the criminal justice system”

Iraq, the BP oil spill, the rights of union workers, food insecurity, and the juvenile incarceration system aren’t necessarily the first things that come to mind when one thinks of a summer afternoon in Santa Barbara. However, they’re what documentary filmmaker and longtime Santa Barbara resident Mark Manning concerns himself with. I walk down a red brick path through a verdant garden to arrive at Manning’s office at Conception Media, which is in the back cottage of a nice town house. Inside, a husky sleeps on the floor, a few screen-savers swirl on several monitors in the background, and Manning goes about brewing herbal tea after kissing his beautiful wife goodbye for the afternoon. He probably went surfing this morning, but he spent all last summer filming incarcerated youth.

After journeys across the country and world for his documentaries, what about the Odyssey Project — a partnership between UCSB and the juvenile justice system that brings incarcerated young men into a theater workshop — caught Manning’s eye? Why this, for his newest film?

“I always look for a way to tell a real important social issue through characters. To humanize the issue,” Manning says, leaning back in his chair.

“I wanted to tell the story of the criminal justice system…and I did it because I was a little bit afraid. I had some fear about meeting them. I realized I don’t know anything about young people of color who are locked up. I’m living a life of white privilege here; Santa Barbara is one of the centers of white privilege in the world. To tell the story of the prison pipeline here is a good juxtaposition.”

So, last summer, Manning and his crew followed the “personal odysseys” of the incarcerated young men participating in UCSB professor Michael Morgan’s Odyssey Project theater class. Those young men created pieces of personal creative writing and art, performed their own spoken word raps, and acted and danced alongside UCSB undergraduates in a public performance retelling The Odyssey as an epic tale of contemporary homecoming. The Odyssey Project film, if it gets produced, has the potential to change the way juvenile incarceration works in America by demonstrating how successful the arts can be as a tool for rehabilitation and reducing the recidivism rates of jailed youth. Manning’s company, Conception Media, collected the footage without certain knowledge of where funding would come from to finish the film.

2015-08-20-1440056179-5312680-IMG_1621Edit.jpg
An incarcerated youth performs in The Odyssey alongside UCSB undergraduates (photo credit Clarissa Koenig)

It’s a labor of love, but Manning wasn’t paid to make the award-winning Road to Fallujah, either. Social justice is what makes Mark Manning tick, and what I find most fascinating about him is that this wasn’t always the case: he came to Santa Barbara when he was still a teenager to go to diving school so he could work for Big Oil out in Louisiana. Born and raised in California’s bay area, Manning was a surfer from early on, and wanted to make a living on the ocean. “There was an oil boom going on at the time,” Manning recalls. “I did underwater welding, burning, construction, explosives, whatever it took. Working 60 to 600 feet down underwater. Fun job, made a lot of money.”

But somewhere in those two decades of working for offshore oil companies, Manning slowly grew a conscience. “I didn’t like the way things were going,” he says simply. So by the time he signed up for an eight-week night class in filmmaking, he knew firsthand “how powerful those corporations actually are. How big they are.”

“A sophisticated machine”

By chance, Manning heard a program on the radio about a documentary about Palestinian children. He quit his oil job, took that filmmaking class, and started making nonprofit PSAs in Santa Barbara. It was 2001, and he couldn’t believe 70% of Americans supported the war in Iraq. “Go up and down State Street and ask people why,” someone suggested.

2015-08-20-1440061797-549575-MarkManning.jpg
Mark Manning (photo credit Clarissa Koenig)

Manning followed that suggestion — except he didn’t just go to downtown Santa Barbara, he went all over the country, talking to Wall Street bankers, members of the Ku Klux Klan, farmers, urbanites, in the South, the Midwest, Los Angeles. He asked them all the same questions, “and no matter the class, race, gender, or location of the person I asked,” Manning says, “they all said the same thing. If they were for the war, they said it was because terrorists hated us for being free. If they were against it, they said it was about oil.” But whenever he asked the interviewee for a fact to back that up — even one — from the Wall Street bankers to the KKK members, no one really had any. Thus Manning made the film American Voices, and in doing so, he learned that the mainstream media is as powerful as the big corporations he’d been working for. “It’s a sophisticated machine out there, influencing all of us.”

Manning’s current work on The Odyssey Project film grows out of the belief that relying on that “sophisticated machine” of mainstream media to tell the truth about incarcerated young men of color would be an exercise in futility. This belief was informed not only by his experience working for Big Oil and making Voices of America, but his firsthand experience in Iraq. As Manning interviewed people for the documentary that would become American Voices, he met Nadia McCaffrey, the mother whose son Patrick was killed in Iraq and who became famous for standing up to the Bush administration (which had claimed it banned the press from documenting military caskets coming home for the sake of the families’ privacy) by inviting the press to view the return of her son’s casket. Nadia asked Mark if he’d come with her to Jordan on her subsequent peace-building mission, where Iraqi families and American families who had lost children in the war were going to meet. That’s how Manning made Journey to Peace. “There was a lot of press there, just not American press. I was the American press,” Manning says wryly. “Some people needed to vent. Some needed to testify. Some people had lost their kids just days before that meeting. I mean, it was raw.”

And in challenging the fear Manning himself had around youth of color in the prison pipeline by embarking on this new documentary about The Odyssey Project, he discovered a similar rawness in the extraordinary space that professor Michael Morgan creates every summer with incarcerated youth in his very own Santa Barbara county. “Just getting to know these incarcerated young guys,” Manning recalls, shaking his head, “and seeing the friendship and relationships and seeing the beauty involved there, the willingness of everybody involved to drop preconceived judgements together, reminded me of watching the American and Iraqi families come together. They just let it go, and that’s where peace happens.”

2015-08-20-1440056375-8019225-IMG_1171.jpg
Incarcerated youth rehearse for The Odyssey alongside UCSB undergraduates, summer 2014 (photo credit Clarissa Koenig)

“The Truth is in the Voices of the People”

While making Journey to Peace with Nadia, Manning befriended an Iraqi woman name Rana, who regularly stopped US Marines from dropping bombs by telling them where she was running to among their targets and emerging with women and children. When Manning went into Iraq in 2004 and 2005 and lived in the city of Fallujah, he did so alongside Rana as one of the only outsiders to live un-embedded in Iraq. Rather, he lived simply as another human in the holy city, which had been the site of the Iraq War’s bloodiest battle in 2004 after four American contractors were killed there. Manning made it a point to tell the story of Fallujah from the perspective of the Iraqi people, and when the resultant film, Road To Fallujah, was released in 2009, it hit the festival circuit with a life of its own, garnering a few awards to boot.

“What’s generally missing in the media,” Manning explains, “are the voices of the people in the stories. You have paid-for pundits, paid-for research, but not those voices. With the Odyssey Project, that’s the missing element of the prison pipeline: where are the voices of the people who are in the pipeline? Where are those voices? That’s where the truth is. The truth is in the voices of the people.”

We conclude our interview by talking about courage, which it takes to make documentary films that might make a difference, sure, but Manning is talking about that of the incarcerated men themselves: “their courage to explore their emotional side, which is difficult when you have to be vulnerable with the new peers you just met, and then with the other people you’re incarcerated with and deal with whatever the framework is there. The courage was a constant blessing to be around. To get along with each other, to drop judgements, to listen, takes courage. And they have it.”

2015-08-20-1440062093-6683671-445A1973.jpg
Incarcerated youth perform The Odyssey alongside UCSB undergraduates, summer 2014 (photo credit Clarissa Koenig)

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Finding Your Calling in an Epiphany: Aviva Kempner and Her Documentary, ‘Rosenwald’

Even though we might wish for it, few of us find our callings in an epiphany: a thunderbolt of lightning revealing what we are meant to do. From that moment on, everything in our life is changed and charged.

Aviva Kempner had such an experience reading Image Before My Eyes: A History of Jewish life in Poland before the Second World War. The book by Sara Brozowsky tells an unfamiliar story of the three and a half million Jews who were living free in a culturally diverse community of city and shtetl, religious and secular, scholarly and creative classes, from poor peddlers to rich merchants. Since the tenth century, only Poland allowed freedom for Jews while other countries restricted Jewish education and contribution or expelling, then murdering Jews. But Poland collaborated with the invading Nazis and turned on their Jewish communities, enslaving and annihilating them in the Holocaust. Aviva Kempner had always wondered why Jews hadn’t resisted and realized in reading Leon Uris’s Mila 18 and other stories about the Warsaw Ghetto uprising that they had, but their stories were little known. Researching her own family inspired her to become a filmmaker.

She might have learned this from her mother, Helen Ciesla Cybensky, who had passed as a Polish Catholic in Germany during the war, but then her mother, who had kept silent about her devastating experience as did other survivors. Her mother, whose parents and sister had died in Auschwitz, wanted to protect her children. In 1945, she was liberated by Americans and married a US Army officer whose own mother had been shot by the Nazis. Three and a half years later, Aviva, the first American-Jewish baby born in Berlin, moved with her parents to Detroit. Her mother, an abstract expressionist painter, exposed her early to art; her father, a political activist, encouraged her. But only in 1960, when Aviva read Exodus, did she understand why Jews fled Europe to settle in Palestine.

Aviva studied psychology as an undergraduate and earned a masters in urban planning — eventually linking the two subjects in her later films. She went to law school to specialize in immigration law and worked at a firm handling immigration cases, but she did not pass the Bar exam, based on multiple choice questions. Her mind, in opposition, was expansive and open.

Reading Images Before My Eyes sparked the epiphany that led her to her own purpose: discovering and filming documentaries of unknown American Jewish heroes. She made four documentaries, each winning awards, translating reality into film: Partisans of Vilna followed by a trilogy of three Jewish lives: The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg, the first Hall of Fame Jewish baseball player, her father’s favorite; Gertrude Berg, the writer-director-producer-actor in television’s first family sitcom, You-Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg; and now, her homage to Julius Rosenwald, the unsung CEO of Sears and quiet revolutionary philanthropist who transformed the lives of Jews and Blacks.

Aviva first heard about Julius Rosenwald twelve years ago, in Martha’s Vineyard, at a talk at the Hebrew Center for and about these two minorities. She listened to Julian Bond, the late eloquent social activist and senator, praise Julius Rosenwald’s gifts — building schools and housing for blacks in the early 1900s and giving grants to nurture emerging black artists and writers. Riveted, she began to investigate.

Julius Rosenwald had apprenticed in his father’s store. Samuel Rosenwald had come with twenty dollars in his pocket from Germany in the 1880’s, carrying dry goods on his back to sell to immigrants, Blacks and Indians. Julius, known as JR, never finished school and partnering with his cousin, started a factory in New York City to manufacture men’s suits. Then he bought into the company started by Richard Sears, a charismatic salesman, and together with his own gift for management built up Sears & Roebuck to be the largest company in the US. By selling goods through mail-order catalogues, a pre-Amazon concept, he replaced the need for peddling or in-store purchases.

JR took the Jewish motto Tikum Ulum to heart: to repair the world. He started helping great numbers of impoverished Jewish immigrants in New York City and then unified opposing German and Eastern European immigrant Jews in Chicago. Influenced after traveling to Europe and seeing a science museum with touchable exhibits in Munich, JR built his Museum of Science in Chicago without branding his own name. JR’s modest life style was visionary: spend a third of his income, save a third and give away a third as seed money.

He addressed racial inequality in America. When Booker T. Washington of Tuskegee Institute invited him to serve on the board, he offered to build schools, desperately needed before desegregation, challenging black communities to participate through their own small donations and to seek larger donations from white sponsors. Black architects on Tuskegee’s faculty designed and taught construction skills to the Black community. When schools were repeatedly burned down by violent bigots, JR had them re-built again, and again. Rosenwald helped create over 5300 black schools across the southern part of the US.

He did more. To help cope with total discrimination in housing, JR created the Michigan Garden apartments in Chicago designed by his nephew. He wanted this living space to encourage real community: apartments surrounding a central park with stores serving the tenants who lived above them. When he recognized that educated black men traveling to northern cities were not permitted in hotels, Rosenwald funded YMCA’s across the country to rent them rooms.

JR created The Rosenwald Foundation to give grants to emerging gifted Blacks such as Gordon Parks, Ralph Ellison, Marion Anderson and others who, in turn, created radiant art, poetry, music, and memoir, enacted legislation and sang anthems for us all. Testifying to his extraordinary contributions in this documentary are Julian Bond, Maya Angelou, Eugene Robinson, Eleanor Roosevelt’s relatives and Rosenwald’s own grandchildren.

Julius Rosenwald is one of our greatest, most unknown heroes. Aviva Kempner’s hope is that this documentary will amend that. She has created The Ciesla Foundation for filmmaking, to keep alive her mother’s family name.

Once we learn what Rosenwald has done, we are inspired by the great panorama of his life’s work and the power of one person to repair the world. Aviva Kempner, an impassioned filmmaker, braiding art and activism through her lens of memory, is another hero.

To begin, you begin!

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

The Best of Enemies, an Oscar-worthy documentary on a handful of screens across America.

By Nicholas F. Benton

The Best of Enemies, an Oscar-worthy documentary on a handful of screens across America now but guaranteed to be a first-rate resource when it hits the Internet for many a moon to come, chronicles the 10 extraordinary, unscripted, live head-to-head TV throw-downs in the Summer of 1968 pitting two of the nation’s premiere intellectuals, William F. Buckley Jr. and Gore Vidal, against each other.

Aimed at spicing up ABC’s coverage of the Republican and Democratic national conventions that summer, the debates were a nationwide sensation because of how the sparks flew between these two men whose faces came within inches of each other and who genuinely hated each other. Not like the canned, insufferably boring exchanges between nominal adversaries swimming in the same big punchbowl of national politics and the major media these days, those exchanges in 1968 were raw, savage and produced, unexpected results, to say the least.

But as commendable as the Morgan Neville and Robert Gordon excellent and timely documentary is, the seminal importance of the Buckley-Vidal encounters (they were more encounters than debates) was missed in their presentation and in almost every review of the film to date.

The encounters represented an historical singularity, a single inflection point that tipped the national consciousness during that hot and intemperate August between the GOP conclave in Miami at the beginning of the month and the anti-war riots and police riot-filled Democratic one in Chicago at the end of the month.

First of all, they were not composed of equals, Buckley on the right and Vidal on the left. Buckley had behind him the full power of the nation’s entire military and industrial establishment, the scions prosecuting the Vietnam War who, as instinctively if not actually most Americans sensed were responsible for the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy just months earlier, and for that matter, before that, of John F. Kennedy and Malcolm X.

Vidal was a fitting adversary, but Buckley agreed to him because he thought he could eat him alive by his usual sophistic debating tactics that made watching his “Firing Line” TV show like watching fish being shot in a barrel.

Vidal was vulnerable in Buckley’s eyes because he was a semi-closeted gay man, intellectually talented but, so Buckley thought, no match for the kind of erudite stabs and cuts that Buckley’s superior mental and verbal rapier skills would bring into play.

Vidal, in my view one of the most under-appreciated figures in U.S. history, presented himself on the set with the eyes and body language of a lonely but brave and happy warrior, with really no one willing to back him up, a Gary Cooper in High Noon-ish type of figure.

This was no debate of equals, this was David versus Goliath if ever there was one.
Appreciating this makes what then happened so much more delightful and important, because Gore Vidal almost literally “tore Bill Buckley a new one.”

Vidal was relentless in taking the fight to his enemy, catching Buckley in contradictions by having researched and quoting from his works, and with highly-charged verbal assaults. Buckley was on the defensive but fought back with his legendary skills of repartee.

But then it got to the ninth encounter, on the eve of the final day of the Democratic convention in Chicago, on Aug. 28, as outside police were smashing anti-war demonstrator heads with billy clubs.

Vidal scored his coup de grace by calling Buckley a “crypto-Nazi.” The close-up of Buckley’s contorted, enraged face at that moment, as he leaned toward Vidal, was like a nasty close-up of the Alien in one of those movies. He snarled, “Now you listen, you queer, stop calling me a crypto-Nazi or I’ll sock you in your goddamn face and you’ll stay plastered.”

That was it. Vidal sank back in his chair with a slight smile. He’d won. Such filthy language was never spoken on TV in that era. Buckley was exposed and crushed.

Millions of Americans attracted to the high-brow nature of this fight subsequently felt permitted to come out against the Vietnam War, generating new waves of mainstream activism that eventually sealed its fate.

‘Best of Enemies:’ How
Vidal Bashed Buckley

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

“Virtuosity,” Documentary on the 2013 Van Cliburn Piano Competition

If competition fosters outstanding performance, the Van Cliburn piano competition shows this works in the arts as well as the economy. “Virtuosity,” a documentary on the 2013 Cliburn competition, is directed by Christopher Wilkinson. The beautiful cinematography is the work of Larry McConkey. Steven Poster was consulting director of photography and associate producer. The result is a deeply moving record of the pressures, anxieties and triumphs of a group of thirty unmatched young piano talents from around the world.

An international artist of renown, Van Cliburn (1934-2013) hailed, quite improbably, from Kilgore, Texas. This meant that he was a Real American. He became an enduring icon of American cultural possibility when, at the age of 23, he unexpectedly won the first International Tchaikovsky Competition in 1958 in Moscow, a Cold War extravaganza designed to demonstrate the Soviet Union’s (i.e. Russia’s) cultural pre-eminence. This surprise recalled Black American Jesse Owens’ track and field triumphs at the 1936 Nazi Party-Aryan race Olympics in Berlin. The Moscow competition’s judges, for safety’s sake, asked Nikita Khrushchev if it was politically permissible to give an American the Moscow prize. To his eternal credit, the Soviet leader replied, “Is he the best? Then give him the prize!” Cliburn’s performance had received an eight-minute standing ovation.

Naturally, in our time the Russians have been displaced by the Chinese, and Moscow has been replaced by Cliburn’s Ft. Worth Texas hometown. The number of Chinese contestants, both Mainland and American, was impressive, but there were Russians, Americans, Italians, Poles and yet others. Among them, many confess on film to anxiety. But others, a lucky few, look supremely confident, imperturbable. “Why should I be anxious?” says one Russian. “I just go out on the stage and play.” Complete technical mastery helps but mental and emotional resilience are primary. The most accomplished player in the rehearsal studio can lose it on stage. How do musicians deal with the stress? Some have particular rituals before playing. One eats two bananas, probably for the potassium. Others have particular omens. A Russian contestant has been wearing the same lucky blue underwear for six years when he competes.

The judges provide insights into the evaluation process. Each year the decisions become more difficult, says one, because today, “most performances are historical,” meaning the quality just gets better and better. Another gives a flat answer as to whether judging can involve some indulgence: “Nobody gets a pass. Ever.” One has to perform sublime notwithstanding an audience of 2,000 people. Evaluations, says another, are inevitably somewhat personal. “You know immediately when somebody is doing something because they were told to do it or whether they really feel it.” A definition of really feeling it: “It’s a rare thing when a player makes you cry.” “Music,” one teacher had told her pupil, “is like a mirror. The way you play it reflects your personality.” The young musician gets the creepy feeling that competitive piano puts at risk one’s very identity and character.

What do the players themselves say about what’s going on, that the entire event is about competition. “I think it’s a necessary evil,” says a Mainland Chinese. “Everyone is so good. The only way to get ahead is ambition.” But another Mainland Chinese summed it up a little differently: “If you win, it doesn’t mean that you’re better than everyone else, and if you lose it doesn’t mean that you’re worse than everyone else.” Bravo for humanism.

Artistic competitions such as the Cliburn exist to nourish the community of artists. But that community of players cannot exist without a community of audiences as well. The point is to keep the fires burning, the interest, the passion, excellence and longing for art alive whether it’s classical music or jazz (cf. the eminent Thelonius Monk international jazz competition). Or, just barely, the Oscars might qualify. Classical music is hard, hard to play and in our time hard to love. A competent and caring public is inspiration for the musician no less than for the painter, the poet or the dancer. In other words, an artist needs other artists but also the rest of us who delight at their competition for glory and to surpass themselves.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Exclusive: This Documentary on Plus-Size Models Will Change the Way You Think About Your Body

Plus-size fashion is having more than a moment, it’s on the brink of a revolution—and models are taking on a leading role.

From Ashley Graham‘s Sports Illustrated ad to Candice Huffine‘s Pirelli Calendar slot, the community has been on the fashion industry’s lips all year. In the midst of such pronounced media attention, producer and former model Jessica Lewis is getting ready to debut Straight/Curve, a documentary that delves into the world of plus-size modeling.

“This generation of models is ready to usher in a new definition of beauty—one that is all inclusive and supports positive body ideals and self acceptance,” said Lewis, who has spent over 15 years as a straight-size and plus-size model. “The fashion industry needs to be reflective and representative of the diversity that exists in present day society.”

Straight/Curve, set to release next summer, aims to examine and redefine the beauty standards put forth by the fashion industry, as they relate to the plus-size fashion. Most importantly, it will be talking about issues often pushed aside. Multiple people will be speaking about sample sizes and how adding a size 14 into circulation will help get diversely sized models in magazines. Agents will be talking about their move towards eliminating plus-size boards and placing all models together. Models will be talking about making plus-size inclusion a non-event in the media.

Straight-Curve-Models

Clockwise from top left: Eva Kay, Natalie Torres, Jessica Lewis, Sarah Hartshorne, and Sabina Karlsson being interviewed for Straight/Curve.

The film is the most insider look at the industry so far, going behind the scenes of New York’s plus-size fashion industry, with a focus on top models, agents, clients, and photographers. The trailer is already loaded with power players, but there are some top models being kept a surprise… So far, we know it will follow industry influencers, including Kate Dillon, Sophie T. Simmons, and Jennie Runk, among others (including this Glamour writer!).

Overall, Straight/Curve aims to expose the complex relationship between the fashion industry, mainstream media, and body image in society. “When, how, and why did size zero become the norm when two thirds of women are considered ‘plus-size’ sitting between a size 10 to 14?” Director Jenny McQuaile told Glamour. “Our documentary will examine this question. There’s always been a complex relationship between the fashion industry, the media, and body image and we’re finally making a film that will investigate that.”

Here’s en exclusive look at the trailer:

Fore more on the plus-size revolution see:
Model Candice Huffine Launches Her Own Collection
Lane Bryant’s New Campaign Will Inspire You
Top Models Discuss The Future of Plus-Size



Dressed
Shop Women’s Sales & Values at macys.com

New Nina Simone Documentary Recalls Past Struggles While Echoing Present

While watching “What Happened, Miss Simone?” — a new documentary about the legendary singer-songwriter Nina Simone — it’s almost impossible not to think about two attacks on black churches that happened 52 years apart.

The first attack, in Birmingham, Alabama, inspired Simone to join the burgeoning civil rights movement of the 1960s. The latter, in Charleston, South Carolina, happened just last week.

In the wake of the latest attack, the Netflix documentary may help shed light on how art like Simone’s can channel anger, fear and frustration about social ills like racism and oppression.

Houses of worship were crucial to Simone’s development as an artist and an activist. As a child in Tryon, North Carolina, Simone played the piano at her local church. During one of her performances, her parents were told to move to the back of the church hall; she said she wouldn’t play until her parents were allowed to move back to the front. But decades later, Simone would say she had “stopped believing in prayer” after racist acts kept being committed against those fighting for civil rights.

Simone’s transformation as an artist came in the wake of the bombing in Birmingham that killed four black girls. “That did it,” Simone says in the film, much of which is narrated in her own voice. While she had made a name for herself with renditions of tunes like “I Loves You, Porgy,” her career changed profoundly after she started to sing about what was happening around her.

“How can you be an artist and not reflect the times?” Simone asked.

Following the Birmingham bombing and the assassination of black civil rights activist Medgar Evers in Mississippi, Simone wrote the song “Mississippi Goddam.” In a recording of a concert she gave at New York City’s Carnegie Hall, Simone calls the song a “show tune, but the show hasn’t been written for it yet.” What was subversive about her performance was that she lulled the the majority-white audience at the concert hall into thinking the song would be jaunty and non-political. But her audience went silent as she told them: “You’re all gonna die and die like flies.” She meant every word of it, she told them.

“Lord have mercy on this land of mine / We all gonna get it in due time / I don’t belong here / I don’t belong there / I’ve even stopped believing in prayer,” she sang. “You keep on saying, ‘Go slow!’ / But that’s just the trouble / ‘Do it slow’ / Desegregation / ‘Do it slow’ / Mass participation / ‘Do it slow’ / Reunification / ‘Do it slow’ / Do things gradually / ‘Do it slow’ / But bring more tragedy / ‘Do it slow.'”

Fifty years ago, Simone performed “Mississippi Goddam” for the thousands of civil rights marchers who walked from Selma, Alabama, to the state capitol in Montgomery. That march was marked by violent state troopers blocking the participants’ progress at the Edmund Pettus bridge, illustrating one of Simone’s arguments in her song: Gradually trying to bring about equality only concedes to the demands of the oppressors.

And yet, as the film shows, there was a danger for Simone in being perceived as too controversial. She attributed a stall in her career to “Mississippi Goddam,” which was boycotted by a number of Southern states.

Despite the backlash to her more confrontational music, Simone still “thought we should get our rights by any means possible,” as she explains in the film. She was in favor of direct action and became affiliated with the black power movement, defiantly telling Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. when she met him at the Selma march that she wasn’t non-violent.

Simone says she felt free on stage. But she also said that to her, freedom meant living without fear. (“I think every day’s gonna be my last,” she sang.) What’s devastating about the documentary in light of the Charleston shooting is its reminder that African Americans have yet to realize that freedom from fear, decades after Simone voiced a desire for it.

“We can’t afford any more losses,” Simone says in the film. “They’re killing us one by one.”

At the Sundance film festival in January, the film’s director, Liz Garbus, acknowledged the resonance of the documentary in comments referring to mass protests across the nation over police killings of unarmed African Americans.

“If we had voices like Nina Simone’s today, speaking the pain and the passion of the movement that’s been building, I think, on the streets in the past six months…” Garbus said, “I think we can all see the place of these songs today.”

“What Happened, Miss Simone?” will be available on Netflix Friday. Watch a trailer for the documentary here.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

The Team Behind ‘Batkid Begins’ Shares Behind-The-Scenes Stories From Their Heartwarming Documentary

In 2013, the Make-A-Wish Foundation made 5-year-old leukemia patient Miles Scott’s dreams come true when they turned San Francisco into Gotham City and transformed Scott into “Batkid.” Alongside a fully-grown Batman partner, Batkid saved a damsel in distress, brought two super-villains to justice and captured the hearts of the thousands who turned up to see his crusade in person and the millions who watched online.

And on June 26, the incredible story comes to the big screen with the documentary “Batkid Begins.” On Wednesday, HuffPost Live’s Ricky Camilleri spoke to the team behind the film and the wish itself to get the behind-the-scenes story of how it all went down.

The documentary chronicles the increasingly elaborate preparation for granting Scott’s wish. Patricia Wilson, the CEO Make-A-Wish Greater Bay Area, said she initially hoped for about 200 people to show up for support. When that turned into more than 25,000, organizers worried all the attention might be too much for a 5-year-old. But when the pressure was on, Bakid never hesitated for a moment.

“I tell you what, the first time he saw that costume, he just started stripping right down to his Batman underwear and put that costume on,” Wilson said. “We put the hood on and I said, ‘Who are you?’ He goes, ‘I’m Batman!’ And I thought, ‘Okay, we’ve got a real Batman here.'”

“Batkid Begins” is in select theaters June 26. Our advice: bring tissues.

Watch the full HuffPost Live conversation with the team behind “Batkid Begins” here.

Sign up here for Live Today, HuffPost Live�s morning email that will let you know the newsmakers, celebrities and politicians joining us that day and give you the best clips from the day before.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

See the First Promo for Caitlyn Jenner’s Documentary Series, I Am Cait

Caitlyn Jenner, the woman formerly known as Bruce Jenner, has become an open book about her gender identity and transition: In the past few weeks, she's sat down with Diane Sawyer, filmed two moving About…




All Entertainment
Call Now: 877-516-9953

‘The Trials Of Spring’ Documentary Project Amplifies Voices Of Women In The Arab Spring

A new multimedia documentary project is spotlighting the vital roles of women in the 2011 Arab Spring uprisings.

“The Trials of Spring,” is a series of six shorts, a feature film and news reports by The New York Times that offer a rarely seen look at the gripping personal experiences of female activists in the wave of revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa.

The films profile nine women across Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Syria, Bahrain and Yemen, with each detailing their journey through uprisings and crackdowns. While each story is unique, they often share an arc similar to the larger political developments of the post-revolution countries in the region, where an initial hope for change is quashed by increasing repression and conflict.

In the Syria short, for example, archival footage shows four women known as the Brides of Peace defiantly march in protest of the Assad regime while wearing homemade wedding dresses. In interviews after fleeing the country, two of the brides describe how their triumphant demonstration caused security forces to imprison them for months.

trials of springKinda Zour, one of the Brides of Peace from Syria.

As the films show, many countries have regressed on women’s rights since the Arab Spring.

A 2013 United Nations report found that 99.3 percent of women in Egypt are subject to sexual harassment, and female activists have been forced to undergo virginity tests after being arrested for demonstrating. In an incident that sparked widespread outrage, police fatally shot female activist Shaimaa al-Sabbagh in the street during a protest earlier this year.

The team of filmmakers and producers, most of them female, presents the cross-platform project as a fascinating counter-narrative to misconceptions of women in the region as submissive to the repression of women’s rights. Instead, the films show brave acts of protest both at home and in the streets, and depict women as driving forces behind many protest movements.

“I went from I think a stereotyped understanding, to some degree, of the women in the Middle East and North Africa, to something that was more nuanced and understanding of their diversity and their strength and resilience,” said producer Beth Levison in a call with reporters on Tuesday.

Levison said stories about the Arab Spring lacked female perspectives, with media focusing mostly on men with guns and shifts in political power.

“I don’t think enough stories are told about the women who are the mortar, who are holding things together,” Levison explained. “I think that the narrative that’s often told about conflict is about who’s in what position, rather than about what’s happening on a day-to-day level to try to bring peace. It’s kind of like that old saying, ‘If it bleeds it leads.'”

anbar
Hend Nafea, a young religious Muslim woman whose story is a lead role in the feature film.

While the project puts a spotlight on activists, the films themselves are not heavy-handed works of advocacy. Instead, the works hope to amplify the voices of the women who are profiled.

“We certainly wanted to avoid the thought that here are some Western filmmakers trying to help these Arab women — because they’re incredibly strong women who can help themselves and are doing a lot to help their countries,” said the project’s Digital Director Lauren Feeney.

The short films will debut on June 7 as a special project on The New York Times homepage and will culminate with the feature focusing on Egypt that premieres at the Human Rights Watch film festival on June 12.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Rape Survivor: Working On A Sexual Assault Documentary Helped Me Heal

Ari Mostov says she was bitter that she felt pushed out of her “dream school” in 2013, after campus officials didn’t take her report of rape seriously.

Now, the 22-year-old is channeling her energy into “It Happened Here,” a documentary about campus rape — work she said makes her feel like she is making an impact and has also helped her heal.

Mostov filed a complaint in May 2013 against the University of Southern California that resulted in an ongoing federal investigation of the school. In the complaint, Mostov detailed that the university’s Department of Public Safety had told her she had not been raped because her assailant stopped and did not orgasm.

Records later obtained by The Huffington Post showed that the DPS had also labeled Mostov’s report as an “injury response” rather than rape, which she believes shows how the school kept sexual assault statistics low.

The increased scrutiny on USC began to subside in 2014. Some of the complainants graduated, while others said they became too stressed to continue speaking about their cases in public. Mostov was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and clinical depression. She had found university employees’ responses to her report of an assault to exacerbate her mental anguish, so she left USC behind.

“I knew returning to school, it was going to be absolute hell again,” Mostov said, so she took time off to address the aftermath of her assault on her own terms.

Mostov was a film and screenwriting major at USC, and was able to find some short-term production work after leaving school. Then she was introduced to Marjorie Schwartz Nielsen in November 2014, who agreed to hire Mostov to help work on the “It Happened Here” release and subsequent campaign and promotions. The film debuted on the cable channel Pivot earlier this year and began being screened on college campuses in conjunction with the White House’s “It’s On Us” anti-sexual violence campaign. It will be released on iTunes and Google Play on May 12.

Working on the film, Mostov said, has been “one of the most amazing experiences” of her life.

“For the longest time I wasn’t able to think about what happened, I wasn’t able to grieve,” Mostov said. “Not being able to return to the school of my dreams and all of this hurt and pain I was putting off — I was finally able to put it to work.”

Nielsen said the survivors she has worked with and interviewed came forward for various reasons — that their assailant attacked someone else, that they felt their school’s atmosphere was getting worse, that they were tired of hearing stories similar to theirs — but what has kept them involved is a desire for “not letting the momentum die.”

“None of them pursued civil suits against their attackers,” she said. “They took up activism because they wanted it to change things.”

Neilsen said the social activism component is critical because to actually eliminate sexual violence, awareness isn’t enough — advocates need to address actual solutions.

At each screening, Neilsen said she explains campaigns some colleges have hosted on their campuses to inspire copy-cat demonstrations, and asks students in attendance to take the White House’s “It’s On Us” pledge.

The “It Happened Here” team has had more than 130 screening requests for the film, including some from organizations in France, Canada and Bangladesh. It’s stretching beyond college campuses, getting screened at several California high schools. On March 30, Mostov and Neilsen spoke about sexual assault at a TEDxYouth event in San Diego. Over the summer, the team will plan for more screenings at schools in the fall. They said they are particularly hoping to get more high school students to see the film, so they can start engaging young people before they arrive at college.

“This affects everyone, and really, in order to stop the cycle, we need to get ahead of these behaviors,” Mostov said. She envisions a day when asking for consent is as routine as asking for a condom.

“We’re really hoping to help to teach people, especially the younger generation, that they have a right to advocate for themselves,” she added. “It’s personally something I really struggled with because I didn’t know.”

Mostov wants to send the message that “I am brave.”

“I am doing this, this happened to me and I’m not going to be silent about it,” she explained. “My story matters too. This is what happened. I don’t care if you don’t believe me, I don’t care. This is what happened to me.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

The Trailer For ‘An Open Secret,’ The Hollywood Child Sex-Abuse Documentary, Will Horrify You

Many kids dream of becoming famous, but few do. Those who attempt to make their hopes come true in Hollywood are exposed to a very adult world while they are still very much children.

Amy Berg’s documentary “An Open Secret” looks at the sexual abuse of children in the entertainment industry, profiling five men (including Michael Egan, who accused “X-Men” director Bryan Singer of abuse last year) who relay their stories of misconduct at the hands of those they trusted to help propel them to stardom.

“An Open Secret” hits theaters on June 5.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

Margiela Documentary to Be Shown at Tribeca Festival

Yoox Group has produced a documentary on the designer Martin Margiela which is being shown in the Narrative/Documentary category at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Called “The Artist is Absent,” the documentary, which was filmed by American writer and director Alison Chernick, explores the creative path of the Belgian designer, one of the most mysterious personalities in the fashion industry. The documentary includes interviews with fashion figures such as Raf Simons and Jean-Paul Gaultier.

“Thanks to Yoox Group, millions of people in the world will have the chance to know the creativity and genius of Martin Margiela, one of the most innovative personalities of the last century,” Chernick said. “I’m proud to have collaborated with Yoox Group, which produced the documentary and made this nomination possible.”

The documentary’s trailer was launched on the Yoox Group’s Web sites, – yoox.com, thecorner.com and shoescribe.com, – on Monday, while the full version will be available online from April 27, after the Tribeca Film Festival’s awards ceremony.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWD » Margiela Documentary to Be Shown at Tribeca Festival
Milanoo.com Ltd

Live From New York! Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Saturday Night Live Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/1F9OK9b
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
Live From New York! Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Saturday Night Live Documentary HD

“Saturday Night Live” has been reflecting and influencing the American story for 40 years. Live From New York! explores the show’s early years, an experiment that began with a young Lorne Michaels and his cast of unknowns, and follows its evolution into a comedy institution. Archival footage is interwoven with stolen moments and exclusive commentary from “SNL” legends, journalists, hosts, crew and others influenced by the comedy giant. Live From New York! captures what has enabled “SNL” to continually refresh itself over nearly 800 episodes and keep America laughing for 40 years.
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

16 Shocking Allegations In Scientology Documentary ‘Going Clear’

The Church of Scientology has long been a controversial institution among both the religious community and entertainment business. But the latest documentary from Oscar-winning director Alex Gibney, “Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief,” explores the secrets of the organization through interviews with former high-ranking officials and former members in a way never seen before.

Based on the 2013 book of the same name by Lawrence Wright, “Going Clear” not only exposes details about Scientology but also serves as an in-depth explainer for those unfamiliar with the group. The Church has spoken out against the film (read their full statement here) as have its celebrity members. But whether you’ve studied Scientology closely or merely know it as “the religion with Tom Cruise,” watching “Going Clear” is a powerful, stunning and emotionally overwhelming experience that will likely leave you with your mouth agape. Here are the most shocking allegations put forth in “Going Clear,” which made its HBO debut on Sunday night:

1. L. Ron Hubbard’s Scientology creation story
When Scientologists reach level OT III, they are shown the “secret materials,” as director and former member Paul Haggis described them: Hubbard’s hand-written account of the creation myth. According to this, 75 million years ago a galactic dictator named Xenu froze people and dropped their bodies into volcanoes. From there, the disembodied spirits, or thetans, apparently jumped into newborns bodies. According to Hubbard, these multiple thetans crowded in our bodies are the source of our anxieties and fears.

l ron hubbard

2. Hubbard spent time in a black magic cult
Before founding Scientology, Hubbard befriended rocket and chemical engineer Jack Parsons who was a part of black magic cult Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO), which followed the teachings of Aleister Crowley. According to “Going Clear,” Hubbard became Parsons scribe and assistant on a magical operation to impregnate a goddess-like woman to create the anti-Christ.

3. Members were allegedly thrown overboard as punishment
Hubbard created Ethics, or punishments for his auditors who made mistakes during sessions. They were then pushed overboard on his ships into the water, which was “30 feet, 35 feet” below, according to Hana Whitfield, one of the original Sea Org members.

4. Hubbard told his second wife he murdered their daughter
When Sara Northup, Hubbard’s second wife, threatened to leave him unless he got psychiatric help, he reportedly kidnapped their daughter Alexis. According to written accounts from Northup, Hubbard told her he “cut [Alexis] into little pieces” and dropped her in a river. Then he would call back and tell Sara that their daughter was alive.

5. There was a Scientology “prison camp”
Former Church member Sylvia “Spanky” Taylor, who was once the liaison between the Church and John Travolta, was sent to the Rehabilitation Project Force (RPF), or what she described as the “prison camp where you’d go for re-indoctrination.” According to the film, when sent to the RPF, people would have to do hard labor for “30 hours on, 3 hours off,” eat table scraps and sleep on dirty, wet mattresses.

scientology

6. The FBI raid on the Church was the biggest in history at the time
On July 8, 1977, the FBI raided Scientology’s Los Angeles, Hollywood and Washington, D.C. locations, which at the time was the bureau’s biggest raid ever.

7. The Church stole government documents
According to the film, in the ’70s, many Scientologists were directed to get jobs in Department of Justice and IRS offices in order to steal documents against or relating to the Church.

8. The Church apparently has a blackmail folder on John Travolta
According to Wright in the film, when there were rumors of Travolta wanting to leave Scientology, the Church created a “black PR package” that has “all the damaging material” from his private auditing sessions. Travolta also reportedly refused to have his sessions video taped, but secret cameras were hidden anyway.

john travolta

9. The Church investigated the IRS
One of the Church’s goals was to be recognized by the IRS as a fully tax-exempt religion, according to former senior executive of the Church Mark “Marty” Rathbun. Thousands of Scientologists reportedly filed 2,400 total lawsuits against IRS employees, and private investigators were sent to IRS conventions to obtain information. According to journalist Tony Ortega, Scientology leader David Miscavige told the IRS commissioner that the lawsuits would go away if the Church was given tax-exempt status. The Church was granted exemption in October 1993.

10. Tom Cruise and the Church allegedly wire-tapped Nicole Kidman’s phone
According to the film, the Church noticed Tom Cruise slipping away from Scientology during his marriage to Nicole Kidman. Cruise reportedly said he wanted to have Kidman’s phone wiretapped, which the Church did at his request.

11. Cruise may have had employees pimp his cars for 40 cents an hour
Sea Org members make 40 cents an hour, according to Ortega, who says, “I don’t think there’s any way Tom Cruise is not aware of that.” According to the film, they have “tricked out his cars and motorcycles” and hanger in Santa Monica, California, and installed the audiovisual equipment at his home.

tom cruise

12. The Church supposedly found Cruise a new girlfriend
According to Wright, Cruise was “overheard to complain that he needed a new girlfriend” when he was in Spain at the opening of a new Scientology center. The Church then found a young Scientologist, Nazanin Boniadi, and reportedly had her braces removed, bought her $ 20,000 of clothes and colored her hair “to Cruise’s liking.” She was then told she would be Cruise’ girlfriend, but the relationship soon ended. Boniadi apparently signed a non-disclosure agreement with the Church and has since become a well-known actress in “Homeland,” “Iron Man,” among other films and shows.

13. Paul Haggis left because of the the Church’s homophobic stance
Oscar-winning filmmaker Paul Haggis (“Crash,” “Casino Royale”) left Scientology in 2009 after 30 years when his two gay daughters told him how they were being treated and harassed by the Church. According to Church doctrines, the religion views homosexuality as a disease. Haggis then wrote a now-famous letter of his resignation from the Church.

paul haggis daughter

14. Scientology’s book value is about $ 1.5 billion
Ortega obtained recent tax records that revealed the main three tiers of the Church (which is a non-profit organization) have a combined book value of $ 1.5 billion.

15. Sea Org members were allegedly tortured to the sounds of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody”
In 2004, Miscaviage apparently ordered the top members of the Sea Org to live in what was known as The Hole in the Chuch’s secret Gold Base in California. In the film, former members say they were told to confess their crimes against the Church in order to leave The Hole. Beyond beatings and one man being ordered to “mop up the bathroom floor with his tongue,” another method of abuse was when members were forced to play musical chairs to “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Those participating were “fighting to stay” in the Church: whoever didn’t have a seat when the music stopped was expelled from the Church.

16. If members leave the Church their friends & family are forced to “disconnect”
The biggest reason to not leave the Church for many Scientologists is fear of “disconnection.” This is when all friends and family members still with the Church are told to cut ties with those who leave, or those deemed Potential Trouble Sources (PTS), or Suppressive Persons (SPs). Many former members included in the film haven’t seen or spoken to their family or friends since they left.

“Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief” airs again on Monday, March 30 at 9:00 p.m. ET on HBO.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

The Wrecking Crew Movie CLIP – Wreck the Business (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
The Wrecking Crew Movie CLIP – Wreck the Business (2015) – Documentary HD

What the Funk Brothers did for Motown… The Wrecking Crew did, only bigger, for the West Coast Sound. Six years in a row in the 1960s and early 1970s, the Grammy for “Record of the Year” went to Wrecking Crew recordings. And now, THE WRECKING CREW tells the story in pictures and that oh, so glorious sound. THE WRECKING CREW is a documentary film produced and directed by Denny Tedesco, son of legendary late Wrecking Crew guitarist Tommy Tedesco. The film tells the story of the unsung musicians that provided the backbeat, the bottom and the swinging melody that drove many of the number one hits of the 1960’s.
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

A Year in Champagne TV SPOT – Now on iTunes (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
A Year in Champagne TV SPOT – Now on iTunes (2015) – Documentary HD

The exploding cork. Endless tiny bubbles floating up and up in the glass. An indulgence. A celebration. A seduction. A triumph. This is the essence of champagne, isn’t it? With renowned wine importer Martine Saunier as our guide, A YEAR IN CHAMPAGNE provides a rare glimpse behind the scenes into the real champagne through six houses, from small independent makers like Champagne Saint-Chamant, where each and every bottle is still turned by hand in the cellars, to the illustrious houses of Gosset and Bollinger, which have been instrumental in shaping the image of champagne around the world.
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

‘Little Ballers’ Documentary Teaches Us That Black Boys Aren’t Monolithic

Different players across the NBA have something in common: they once played basketball with the AAU, aka the Amateur Athletic Union, a non-profit organization that provides sporting activities for kids across the country. One film sheds light on the dreams, challenges, wins and losses of youth in the program.

“Little Ballers,” a 2013 documentary that premieres Wednesday on Nickelodeon, focuses on the New York-based AAU basketball team New Heights as they fight their way to the national championship. Four boys in particular, Judah, Tyriek, Cole and Kevin, pepper in their opinions on basketball and life in general, noting their personal goals of making it to the NBA.

At 11 years old, these boys evoke the raw emotion of childhood innocence, which is counterbalanced by the adults of the movie — including their Coach Billy, current and former NBA players like Carmelo Anthony and Walt Frazier, and cultural pundits such as Travis King and Roland Martin — who stress the idea that dreams also have a layer of reality to them.

coach billy and judah

In addition to its all-star cast, “Little Ballers” is directed by author Crystal McCrary, who happens to be one of the team moms, and executive produced by recording artist Lupe Fiasco and NBA player Amar’e Stoudemire.

McCrary was just a mom with a camera in her hand when the idea of the documentary blossomed. “I didn’t know where the story was going to go,” the director told The Huffington Post, adding that she’s a “filmmaker, sports fanatic and a lover of children,” which were all factors leading to her telling New Heights’ story.

Throughout filming, McCrary encountered a slew of emotions, including on-court tantrums, locker room tears and, of course, the unabashed boys who tell it like it is. “Since the boys hadn’t had any real disappointments in their 11-year-old lives, they believed they could scale Mount Everest, they believed that they are going to make it to the NBA, despite the fact that the odds are overwhelmingly against them,” she said. “And that’s inspirational.”

However, there are underlying themes within “Little Ballers” that bring up society’s ongoing interaction with black boys and men. The film illuminates the issue of street and gang violence, and how the AAU helps kids avoid dangerous situations, allowing them to make safer decisions.

Chicago Bulls player Joakim Noah’s initiative, the Noah’s Arc Foundation, aims to mentor gang members and encourage them to make better choices for their future. He speaks in the film about the importance of extracurricular activities, which McCrary said was a focal point in the movie. Noah mentioned that there isn’t much for the gang members to do other than inflict violence in their community, and McCrary agreed that any sort of activity provided for inner-city youth outside of school is crucial.

“I’m not one of those people that says basketball replaces education, nor am I trying to sell a pipe dream,” McCrary noted, saying that while basketball is a popular attraction, there are other avenues of expression when it comes to extracurriculars. “So, that could be a chess club, debate team,” she said, adding, “It’s just important to show that there are so many attributes that kids can acquire by being on an organized team.” This includes life skills, healthy lifestyle choices, discipline and structure, all of which can promote a better future when instilled in kids at, say, age 11.

the team

Further, McCrary touches on another overarching tone: the stereotypical notion that black people, especially men and boys, are monolithic characters in America — especially in the social and political climate following the killings of Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin and several others.

New Heights wasn’t just a “black team,” as its members had different backgrounds, but the film mostly focuses on black players and coaches, which has more meaning than just race. “It’s about these four boys that come from diverse family and economic situations,” McCrary said.

One of the kids, Tyriek, lives with his single mother in the gang-ridden Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn. McCrary talked about him throughout the conversation. “Typically, when society sees a kid like Tyriek walking down the street in his community, he’s immediately written off as some sort of statistic or some sort of other — so the kid is not destined to achieve,” she said.

ty and mom

However, there’s always more to the story. “Just because you are being brought up in poverty, that doesn’t make you a criminal,” McCrary added. “It also doesn’t mean you’re not brought up in an environment that’s filled with love, just as much as that kid that lives in the suburbs with two parents and a white picket fence, who also is brought up with love.”

More importantly, McCrary felt like the boys’ different upbringings prove that in the face of diversity, there can be common ground. “So, we as people of color in this country come from all different backgrounds and all different family situations, so we’re not monolithic,” McCray said, but the team’s commitment to each other combats stereotype.

“I also found inspiration in the bond that they developed as brothers,” she noted. “For these young men, race, class and culture really meant nothing, but what did mean something was the brotherhood they developed playing together as teammates and getting to know each other off the court.”

“Little Ballers” premieres on Nickelodeon on Feb. 25 at 9 p.m. EST. Check your local listings.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Portrait of filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn during the filming and release of Only God Forgives (2013).

“My Life Directed By Nicolas Winding Refn” “My Life Directed By Nicolas Winding Refn movie” “My Life Directed By Nicolas Winding Refn trailer” “only god forgives” “ryan gosling” “nicholas winding refn” “Liv Corfixen” “Alejandro Jodorowsky” documentary kcostello
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

Ballet 422 Movie CLIP – Finale Step (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
Ballet 422 Movie CLIP – Finale Steps Rehearsal (2014) – Documentary HD

From first rehearsal to world premiere, BALLET 422 takes us backstage at New York City Ballet as Justin Peck, a young up-and-coming choreographer, crafts a new work. BALLET 422 illuminates the process behind the creation of a single ballet within the ongoing cycle of work at one of the world’s great ballet companies.
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

The Search for General Tso Movie CLIP – Nixon in China (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
The Search for General Tso Movie CLIP – Nixon in China (2015) – Documentary HD

This mouthwateringly entertaining film travels the globe to unravel a captivating culinary mystery. General Tso’s chicken is a staple of Chinese-American cooking, and a ubiquitous presence on restaurant menus across the country. But just who was General Tso? And how did his chicken become emblematic of an entire national cuisine? Director Ian Cheney (King Corn) journeys from Shanghai to New York to the American Midwest and beyond to uncover the origins of this iconic dish, turning up surprising revelations and a host of humorous characters along the way. Told with the verve of a good detective story,The Search for General Tso is as much about food as it is a tale of the American immigrant experience.
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

Above and Beyond Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
Above and Beyond Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

In 1948, just three years after the liberation of Nazi death camps, a group of Jewish American pilots answered a call for help. In secret and at great personal risk, they smuggled planes out of the U.S., trained behind the Iron Curtain in Czechoslovakia and flew for Israel in its War of Independence. This ragtag band of brothers not only turned the tide of the war; they also embarked on personal journeys of discovery and renewed Jewish pride. ABOVE AND BEYOND is their story. The first major feature-length documentary about the foreign airmen in the ’48 War, ABOVE AND BEYOND brings together new interviews as well as stunning aerial footage to present a fascinating, little-known tale filled with heart, heroism and high-flying chutzpah.

“above and beyond” “above and beyond documentary” “above and beyond trailer” documentary Nazi jewish pilots “iron curtain” vchan
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

Farewell to Hollywood Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
Farewell to Hollywood Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Release Schedule: 2/25 – NY & LA, national rollout March-April.

Official Website: http://farewelltohollywood.com/
Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FarewellToHollywood
OfficialTwitter: https://twitter.com/FarewelltoHWood

Synopsis: In a recurring poetic image, 17-year-old Regina Diane Nicholson swings between heaven and earth on a breathtakingly high cliff by the sea. Reggie is a tomboy struggling with a terminal illness, her parents and her dream of making a film. She impresses us with her loving, strong personality and wisdom beyond her years, as well as her morbid sense of humor. When director Henry Corra met 17-year-old filmmaker Regina Nicholson at a film festival nearly three years ago, he agreed to help her make a feature film. What developed over nearly two years is a powerful friendship and poignant relationship between Reggie and Henry. He became her collaborator, friend and defender in her fight to find artistic and personal freedom. When Reggie turns 18 and can make decisions on her own, things become even more intense. This film is a poetic fairytale about love and death, holding on and letting go – one that invites us to discuss the relationship between filmmaker, subject and family. An eclectic mix of images with the intimacy of a video diary or home movie, it is filmed both by Henry and by Reggie and supplemented by their text message exchanges, images from her favorite movies, and fairytale-like scenes with songs that together form a heartwarming, but also heartbreaking and controversial ode to Reggie’s life.

Producer: Jeremy Amar

Director: Henry Corra, Regina Nicholson

Writer: Henry Corra, Regina Nicholson, Kimberly Hassett

Cast: Regina Nicholson, Henry Corra

“farewell to hollywood” “farewell to hollywood documentary” “farewell to hollywood trailer” documentary “henry corra” “regina nicholson” “terminal illness” dream love death “video diary” “home movie” vchan
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

The Search for General Tso Movie CLIP – Jewish Christmas (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
The Search for General Tso Movie CLIP – Jewish Christmas (2015) – Documentary HD

This mouthwateringly entertaining film travels the globe to unravel a captivating culinary mystery. General Tso’s chicken is a staple of Chinese-American cooking, and a ubiquitous presence on restaurant menus across the country. But just who was General Tso? And how did his chicken become emblematic of an entire national cuisine? Director Ian Cheney (King Corn) journeys from Shanghai to New York to the American Midwest and beyond to uncover the origins of this iconic dish, turning up surprising revelations and a host of humorous characters along the way. Told with the verve of a good detective story,The Search for General Tso is as much about food as it is a tale of the American immigrant experience.
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

Light Girls Documentary Airs January 19 | Oprah Winfrey Network

Sharing the untold stories and experiences of lighter-skinned women, ‘Light Girls’ dives deep into the discussion of skin color, preference, privilege, pain and prejudice.

Find OWN on TV at http://www.oprah.com/FindOWN

SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1vqD1PN

A month-long celebration in January honoring civil rights legends who paved the way as we approach the 50th anniversary of the historic Selma to Montgomery marches led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. that changed the trajectory of America forever.

About OWN:
Oprah Winfrey Network is the first and only network named for, and inspired by, a single iconic leader. Oprah Winfrey’s heart and creative instincts inform the brand — and the magnetism of the channel.

Winfrey provides leadership in programming and attracts superstar talent to join her in primetime, building a global community of like-minded viewers and leading that community to connect on social media and beyond. OWN is a singular destination on cable. Depth with edge. Heart. Star power. Connection. And endless possibilities.

Discover OWN TV:
Find OWN on your TV!: http://bit.ly/1wJ0ugI
Our Fantastic Lineup: http://bit.ly/1qMi2jE

Connect with OWN Online:
Visit the OWN WEBSITE: http://bit.ly/1qMi2jE
Like OWN on FACEBOOK: http://on.fb.me/1AXYujp
Follow OWN on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1sJin8Y
Follow OWN on INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/LnqzMz
Follow OWN on PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/1u0CqR6

Light Girls Documentary Airs January 19 | Oprah Winfrey Network
http://www.youtube.com/user/OWN
Uploads by OWN TV

The Search for General Tso Movie CLIP – Who is General Tso? (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
The Search for General Tso Movie CLIP – Who is General Tso? (2015) – Documentary HD

This mouthwateringly entertaining film travels the globe to unravel a captivating culinary mystery. General Tso’s chicken is a staple of Chinese-American cooking, and a ubiquitous presence on restaurant menus across the country. But just who was General Tso? And how did his chicken become emblematic of an entire national cuisine? Director Ian Cheney (King Corn) journeys from Shanghai to New York to the American Midwest and beyond to uncover the origins of this iconic dish, turning up surprising revelations and a host of humorous characters along the way. Told with the verve of a good detective story,The Search for General Tso is as much about food as it is a tale of the American immigrant experience.
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

Deli Man Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
Deli Man Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Jewish culture reflects the heart of a vital ethnic history. As that culture continues to shift and adapt alongside mainstream America, delicatessen food—as its name suggests—remains a beloved communal delicacy. In Houston, Texas, third-generation deli man Ziggy Gruber has built arguably the finest delicatessen restaurant in the U.S. His story—augmented by the stories of iconic delis such as Katz’s, 2nd Avenue Deli, Nate ‘n Al, Carnegie, and the Stage—embodies a tradition indelibly linked to its savory, nostalgic foods.

“deli man” “deli man documentary” “deli man trailer” documentary “Erik Greenberg Anjou” “Ziggy Gruber” “Larry King” “Jerry Stiller” documentary deli jewish sandwich houston texas “ziggy gruber” katz’s “2nd avenue deli” “nate ‘n al” camegie stage traditional vchan
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

See the New Trailer for the Upcoming Backstreet Boys Documentary, Get Instant Nostalgia Overload

Last night, several Glamour staffers went out for some karaoke fun, and one of the biggest hits of the night was the Backstreet Boys classic "I Want It That Way." And just this past weekend,…




All Entertainment
Call Now: 877-516-9953

Silent Waters: Tsunami 10 Years On Official Trailer (2014) – Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
Silent Waters: Tsunami 10 Years On Official Trailer (2014) – Documentary HD

What happened once the waters receded, the beaches were cleaned up and the aid organisations left? Silent Waters provides an intimate glimpse into the lives of fishing communities on an undeveloped Thai island in the Andaman Sea.

The immense power from the waves destroyed the main village of 200 households. Many survivors moved to the mainland, too afraid to return. Those that chose to re-build their lives on the island recap their memories of that fateful day and how they coped after losing their families, homes and livelihood. They talk about their concerns for the future and how their unique lifestyle will likely change with the arrival of electricity.

“silent waters” “silent waters: tsunami 10 years on” “silent waters: tsunami 10 years on movie” “silent waters: tsunami 10 years on trailer” “mike thomas” thailand island “andaman sea” village re-build vchan
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

Life Itself Movie CLIP – Ava DuVernay (2014) – Roger Ebert Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
Life Itself Movie CLIP – Ava DuVernay (2014) – Roger Ebert Documentary HD

Acclaimed director Steve James (Hoop Dreams) and executive producers Martin Scorsese (The Departed) and Steven Zaillian (Moneyball) present LIFE ITSELF, a documentary film that recounts the inspiring and entertaining life of world-renowned film critic and social commentator Roger Ebert—a story that is by turns personal, funny, painful, and transcendent. Based on his bestselling memoir of the same name, LIFE ITSELF explores the legacy of Roger Ebert’s life, from his Pulitzer Prize-winning film criticism at the Chicago Sun-Times to becoming one of the most influential cultural voices in America.
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness Movie CLIP – The Last Scene (2014) – Studio Ghibli Documentary HD

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness Movie CLIP – The Last Scene (2014) – Studio Ghibli Documentary HD

Granted near-unfettered access to the notoriously insular Studio Ghibli, director Mami Sunada follows the three men who are the lifeblood of Ghibli – the eminent director Hayao Miyazaki, the producer Toshio Suzuki, and the elusive and influential “other director” Isao Takahata – over the course of a year as the studio rushes to complete two films, Miyazaki’s The Wind Rises and Takahata’s The Tale of The Princess Kaguya. The result is a rare “fly on the wall” glimpse of the inner workings of one of the world’s most celebrated animation studios, and an insight into the dreams, passion and singular dedication of these remarkable creators.

“the kingdom of dreams and madness” “the kingdom of dreams and madness documentary” “the kingdom of dreams and madness clip” documentary “hayao miyazaki documentary” “hayao miyazaki” “studio ghibli” “mami sunada” ghibli “toshio suzuki” “isao takahata” “the wind rises” “the tale of the princess kaguya” animation “animation studios” filmmakers “animated films” jslewis
Uploads by Film Festivals and Indie Films

Fandango Now Tickets for AMC Theatres!

Pin-Ups for Vets Documentary Models Glam It Up While Raising Funds for Their Fellow Veterans

2014-11-05-10689769_717822671628589_577319473378011176_n.jpg

Pin-Ups for Vets Founder Gina Elise, Navy Vet Buddy Watson, Julia Reed Nichols

Veterans Day is a time to remember the past as well as the ongoing courage and sacrifice of our enlisted men and women. It’s also a time to pitch in and help. An inspired woman, lovely Gina Elise, and her team are releasing a documentary, Pin-Ups for Vets, that honors them all. Produced by TV4 Entertainment and created by southern California-based Elise, the documentary, which will start airing on YouTube’s All Warrior Network (November 11), is an adjunct to Elise’s very tasteful but sexy annual Pin-Ups for Vets Calendar whose proceeds go to benefit hospitalized veterans.

Having been published since 2007, the 2015 calendar features for the first time 12 veterans including nine female veterans and three male veterans. The female pin-up models were photographed in classic 1940s pin-up style surrounded by retro airplanes and automobiles. The photos, taken by April Smith, brilliantly recapture the authentic feel of the original WWII pin-up depictions, which were painted on planes or hung up as pictures in barracks, and which reminded our troops of what they were fighting for back home.

The new documentary captures the behind-the-scenes action of the 2015 calendar Pin-Ups for Vets shoot, and Elise explains, “One of the veterans, Shannon Stacy, was a Naval Flight surgeon and is now an ER doctor! Jovane Henry was a model in Japan for two years before joining the Marine Corps. They are all very inspirational individuals, and by asking them to be models is a great way to start telling their amazing stories. They are superheroes to me! I want the rest of America to learn about our Vets, generally, how resilient they are, and be inspired by them!”

2014-11-05-RickyRybaNavyGina.png

Navy Vet Ricky Ryba and Gina Elise with 1954 Mercury Monterey – Photo by April Smith

Elise’s inspiration began in 2006 when she heard stories about severely wounded service members returning from their deployments in Iraq but finding many healthcare programs overcrowded or underfunded. She continues,

There was also a large number of aging Veterans from past wars that were entering the hospitals to add to the patient load. I wanted to do something to honor my grandfather’s Army service during WWII, and I had always loved the beautiful nose art on the WWII military planes that depicted beautiful women. I took my love of that art form to produce the first pin-up fundraiser calendar that we sold in 2007, hoping to purchase equipment for the VA hospitals. Equipment always gets worn out and we thought this was the best way to spend our funds — to buy brand new rehabilitation equipment for our veterans.

Determined Elise and her team have produced nine calendars, and visited over 6,000 ill and injured vets at their bedsides in 48 Veteran facilities nationwide and in Germany. In the process, they have donated over $ 50,000 dollars worth of new equipment for VA and Military hospitals nationwide.

2014-11-05-JovaneHenry.png

USMC Vet Jovane Henry with 1941 Ryan PT-22 “Recruit” plane – Photo by April Smith

USMC veteran Jovane Henry, explains her own reason for getting involved:

I was aware that pin-ups have been a mainstay in military culture since WWII. I’d been a model professionally in Tokyo but I’d never done pin-up style posing. Contrary to popular belief, the posing was not overtly sexual by any means. I felt a sense of pride that I was joining a genre of women who had boosted the morale of troops and encouraged them to remember what they were fighting for back home. As a woman veteran, I felt beautiful and empowered in my feminine energy — which isn’t exactly encouraged in a military environment. And as a veteran, it was even more rewarding. There are so many ways to serve the community, and this calendar was just one way for me to give back. The look on the wounded warriors’ faces that we visit is already great, but when they learn that I’m a veteran and we have that instant connection, it’s even better. I am still motivating and supporting my fellow troops, just with red lipstick and without the combat boots!

2014-11-05-ShannonStacyNavy.png

Navy Vet Shannon Stacy with 1940 Stearman – Photo by April Smith

In many ways, Shannon Stacy and Jovane Henry and the other terrific Pin-Ups for Vets models — who ranged from Navy Seabee to combat Correspondent and Flight Surgeon — honor the past contributions of Betty Grable, Rita Hayworth, Jane Russell and Gene Tierney to the military cause. But they also honor our continuing fascination with the 1940s and 1950s. Elise adds, “Retro style is incredibly flattering to the female figure, it accentuates all the best places. The make-up style isn’t that hard to achieve — apart from the clothes, all you need is red lipstick and cat eye liner. Simple, yet so classic.”

Follow Pin-Ups for Vets on Facebook.

Follow Pin-Ups for Vets on Twitter.
Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

‘Dick: The Documentary’ Explores The ‘Physical And Emotional’ Relationship Men Have With Their Penis (NSFW)

Ben Affleck made headlines after announcing that he’d appear fully nude in “Gone Girl,” one of this season’s most hotly-anticipated new movies.

While viewers have so far been divided as to whether or not Affleck’s full-frontal scene lives up to the hype, the actor’s proclamation once again sparked a conversation over why male genitalia continues to be such a taboo, not just in Hollywood but also society at large.

Filmmaker Brian Fender aims to explore this dilemma, as well as others in regard to male sexuality, in “Dick: The Documentary.” For the film, Fender interviewed 63 men, between the ages of 22-82, who stripped nude and revealed themselves “physically and emotionally” through personal stories about their relationship to their penises.

Directed by Fender and produced by Chiemi Karasawa (“Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me“), the resulting documentary is billed as “a revealing and candid exploration of an unspoken ‘member’ of modern society,” the penis.

Fender revealed his inspiration for the new movie, and shared his thoughts on why male sexuality, in an interview with The Huffington Post. Check out a clip from the movie above (WARNING: NSFW) and check out what he had to say below.

The Huffington Post: Where were you when you first got the inspiration for the film?
Brian Fender: I was at an independent filmmaker’s conference (IFP) listening to a symposium on innovative ways to raise money for film. I had just finished an accidental documentary film called “XYQ,” which had started out as a video installation in a gallery show about LGBT youth in St. Louis.

I self-produced the two DVD set and now have about 950 copies in a closet in our Upper West Side apartment. So, I was thinking that for a commercially viable film, it had to be about sex. I am gay man, so obviously I was curious how men were affected by their dicks. I certainly have been affected by other men’s dicks.

How do you think finding subjects via Craigslist affected the outcome of the film?
We tried other ways of soliciting people, but Craigslist was the only successful venue. I would have preferred a broader cross section of participants, but what I got was an educated sample of men that thought this was a worthy project and wanted to be a part of it. I only got one creepy guy, who wore a Lone Ranger mask. Even though I met him for coffee to explain my intentions for the film, he still thought I wanted to hook-up.

What was the most surprising thing you learned while making the film?
I found that the men who participated were very thoughtful. I didn’t get any sexist thugs, which I was kind of disappointed about. I assume that men who are more conservative and judge sexual expression beyond the heterosexual paradigm — and would probably call these men, myself included, a pervert — would, I imagine, have less healthy sexual attitudes and feel threatened by the questions this film asks. But as educated as my subjects were, many of them told me that this was the first time they had said these things out loud and that they found it cathartic. I had also wanted to talk about using your dick as a weapon, but I got the feeling from these men that they weren’t sexually aggressive. The one thing that is funny is that there isn’t a glimmer of consensus about the dick. The opinions are as varied as the penises themselves.

Though the phallus rules all, the sight of a penis is still a taboo thing in many respects. Why do you think that is?
The reason why the phallus is so taboo with men is homophobia. If I freely look at another man’s penis, am I gay? What if I get turned on? For women it is the member that can make them a “whore.” If they admit to loving dick and look at dicks freely what does that mean about them? We are all conditioned harshly to not even consider men’s penises except in a humorous context or porn.

The truth is: most people love dick. Most men love their own, most women love them, and gay men are obsessed with them. That’s why I wanted to confront the audience with all of these penises in an innocuous setting. After about five minutes it just becomes a non-threatening appendage and people start making the bodies into faces. I think at some level, a large majority of people in this country think the human body is shameful.

What do you hope viewers take away from the film?
I hope it opens up a dialogue about sexuality in general.

My unrealistic hope is that people will start talking to their kids about sexuality while they are young: letting them know it is a gift that they should cherish and care for and that when they want to act on their sexuality, they should be responsible. But that’s too rational for most religious people, so they will distort their boy’s minds through guilt and shame and create sexually immature men who abuse women and children because they don’t how to express their sexuality appropriately. Sexual abuse is an epidemic; we have to do something different.

Check out more on “Dick: The Documentary” here.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

The Making of Them: TV Documentary Review (belated)

I revisited my childhood yesterday. I have been reading Wounded Leaders: British Elitism and the Entitlement Illusion, a recent book by Nick Duffel, (I’ll have more to say about the book in a later post) and came across a reference to a video made in 1994 for the BBC, The Making of Them. I had an exchange of correspondence with Nick Duffell some fifteen years ago, at the time of the publication of my own memoir, While I Am Not Afraid: Secrets of a Man’s Heart. I’m no longer sure how it came about, but I heard about the organization he had founded, Boarding School Survivors, and the title immediately struck a chord. I am, myself, a “survivor” of the British boarding school system, and was pleased to learn that someone was seriously addressing the issues I had been struggling with for my entire adult life.

“The Making of Them” is about the earliest stage of the private boarding school system, the “prep” school. Boys–and girls, but I was obviously at an all-boys school; my sister has a similar story–are sent there by their parents at the age of seven or eight, and spend their early education there until about age twelve, when they move on to “public”. i.e. private boarding school. What I remember most from that time in my life is the intense loneliness, the homesickness, the sense of alienation and difference from all the other boys. In retrospect, much later, I learned to acknowledge that I was suffering, but would have been unable to formulate such a recognition at the time. As an act of self-preservation, if nothing else, it was necessary to conceal it. Vulnerability was not an option. I created for myself a fine, extremely effective coat of armor–and wore it for another four decades. I still find myself, today, shielding myself from the unkind world out there! I am still uncomfortable with my body. I still “hold myself in.”

The BBC documentary brought these memories and feelings back with force. At several points, I found myself holding back (see?!) the tears. Granted, things had changed much between 1994 and when I first went to boarding school, in 1943. I was seven years old. Funny, I often hear myself saying I was six, but I must have been seven by then. These days, to judge from the documentary, the teachers and staff make a far greater effort to be kind and compassionate. I watched with interest, for example, how a small group of the boys themselves gathered protectively around a little lad who was suffering from homesickness. In my day, that kind of vulnerability would have been met with jeers and teasing. Even the school environment seemed friendlier, more open to individuality and expressive freedom. The periods of separation from the parents seemed much shorter: three weeks was mentioned. My own terms lasted an three interminable months, three times a year. With luck, your parents might come down at mid-term to take you out to lunch.

I watched those parents in the video, thinking of my own. How they felt, said, persuaded themselves that this was “the best thing” for their children. But their facial expressions and body language betrayed quite different feelings than their words. I noticed how a mother, picking her son up to bring him home, asked the leading question, “Was it wonderful?” To which the boy could only answer, yes. The discordance between words and body language on the part of both the parents and their sons is, at times, painful to watch. Like these young boys, I was unable to be truthful with my parents: at huge sacrifice, they were buying me the best education they could think of; it was my job to be grateful, not to whine. But at what cost, to live so great a lie?

So it’s a slightly more enlightened time, I think. At one moment, I watched with envy how a mother hugged her little boy in a genuine effusion of affection, and told him–in parting!–that she loved him. How, he must have been thinking, if she loved him, could she drive off and leave him? My own mother could never have hugged me in that way at Victoria Station, where they left me off. My father would shake my hand to say goodbye. So, yes, things have changed in many ways for the better. But still… the impact of the documentary is unmistakable: the institution of the boarding school is no substitute for what young children need most at this time in their lives, the love of their parents and the security of home. (I’m tempted to add that it’s not only boarding schools that cause the childhood wounds which, unless we work to heal them, we carry around with us for life. But that’s another story…)

I note with curiosity that there are two ways of hearing that title phrase. Until I watched this documentary I had heard only one of them–“The Making of Them”–the one with the emphasis on the last word: Them. The boarding school system is geared to creating a specific class of people, them, a peculiarly British elite, the ones who go on to Oxford or Cambridge and who generally end up running the country. O lucky me! I am one of them, and I have traveled many miles on my nice educated English accent, my charm, my finely educated mind. I “should be grateful,” and in so many ways I am. I account myself one of Them.

But then I heard one of the mothers say the words in a quite different way: “It’s the making of them,” she said. I registered the difference with a shock. It was like one of those optical illusions, where you can’t see one aspect of the image until you blink your eyes, and then can’t see the other. Of course. I had never heard it, in my mind, with this particular emphasis. This way, it gets to be the justification, a positive rather than a negative. This way, the mother could allow herself to believe that the experience was a fine way for her son to build the character he’d need to be successful in his future life.

In this context, I’ll confess to a part of myself that listened to the grown men in this powerful and moving documentary, products of the boarding school system, with the knee-jerk response: they’re “wet,” to resort to the boys’ school terminology; they’re “pathetic.” These extraordinarily privileged men actually feel sorry for themselves. Such was my conditioned reaction; and in this way was my conditioning so powerful, it triggered that judgment over decades of sometimes deep inner work and reflection. Because I recognized myself in them, these men who had come to understand the depth of the wound they had sustained, and the lasting effects it can have on a man’s life–including, but not limited to the ability to form trusting relationships and engage in simple expressions of love. Like the hugs my wife reminds me again this morning, as I write, I am too reticent to share…

Please note: you don’t have to be a “boarding school survivor” to find deep resonance in this documentary. You just need to have survived your childhood. Which, likely, if you are reading this, you have done.
Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Why I Made a Documentary About What It Means to Be 11

Tell anyone you spent six years traveling the world interviewing 11-year-olds for a documentary, and the first two words you’ll get are always the same: Why 11?

The opening scene of I AM ELEVEN explains that when I was 23, I started working in the newsroom of a major newspaper in Melbourne, Australia. On my first day on the job, I was confronted by images of devastation and loss. The Boxing Day tsunami had just hit, killing over 200,000 people across Asia.

A year later, I took time off work to go overseas for the very first time. I had recently been in a serious car accident, my dad had passed away from cancer, and I was depressed. I didn’t want to lie on a beach somewhere; I wanted to shoot a film in every country I went to.

I thought back to my favorite age in life and why I loved it so much. For me, that was when I was 11: the world felt big in a good way, and it was at my feet. With so much more information available at their fingertips now than we had when I was young, I wondered, are 11-year-olds still happy and excited about inheriting this crazy world? Are they having as much fun as I did when I was 11? Are they hopeful?

henrik nordstrom

I wanted to make something energetic, optimistic, universal and real. Little did I know I would spend the next six years exploring the world, directing, producing, shooting, editing and distributing my first film.

One mother approached me after seeing the film and said, “It’s like a parenting book written by children.” I love this feedback; it has really stuck with me. I am happy that the children in the film can provide inspiring insights to parents worldwide.

My camera took me from my first stop in Tokyo, to an Indian orphanage, to an elephant sanctuary in Thailand — from the cobbled streets of Prague to Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Kids opened up to me in twelve languages about topics personal and universal. Eleven-year-olds are still sorting out their priorities and opinions — is love amazing or gross? Would you rather have a four-day weekend or a roof over your head? Do I want to be a pilot, or a dancer, or a nurse?

I really wanted the children I interviewed to be comfortable and empowered. The film is not about me, or other adults. You don’t need me laying on the violins or delivering a “Godlike” voiceover telling you what is happening. It feels more authentic to let each of these kids just speak for themselves, and if you’re really willing to listen to what they say, there are a lot of surprises in this film for you.

i am eleven

I decided early in the filming process that the easiest way to find 11-year-olds in foreign cities would be to go through schools. But I also thought that teachers might nominate the student with the highest grades, or acting experience, rather than the most interesting subject. I wanted the selection process to be more random, so I would hit the streets, go to markets, speak to locals and find children in all sorts of memorable ways. I gave myself three rules: they had to be 11, they had to want to be in the film (not all children in the media are the ones choosing to be in front of cameras, and I never wanted any of the children to be pressured into participating) and their parent or guardian had to give consent. Other than that, I was open to any child from any background.

As I filmed kids all over the world, I realized that 11 is a unique age in ways we don’t always appreciate. I discovered that 11-year-olds really are standing at a cusp, a year of transition when they no longer see themselves as little kids anymore (even though some adults still do). They’re old enough to form their own views of the world around them, and they have an independence and curiosity that’s really inspiring. At the same time, they don’t have the painful self-consciousness of teenagers, and are far less worried about the “image” they’re projecting. They don’t put up as many walls.

I later learned that biology backs up this theory. These are times when your brain makes more connections more quickly, and you’re absorbing massive amounts of information and processing it rapidly. You might see it as the age you begin to become who you are. Alternatively, you could see it as the age when the future is most open.

i am eleven

What I discovered was that despite these children having loving families and communities around them, some of them relished the chance to be involved in my film. The invitation to sit and speak honestly about global issues with a complete stranger is not something every adult would be comfortable with, but I was impressed by how many 11-year-olds stepped up to the plate with pride. In my grandparents’ generation, children were encouraged to be “seen and not heard.” I think that in many parts of the world that has changed, and is changing. I believe that too often we as a culture focus on what adults can teach children, without acknowledging what we can also learn from young people. This was yet another reason why I feel so compelled to share I AM ELEVEN. I see it as an opportunity to encourage audiences young and old to sit down together, to engage with these children, their ideas, their concerns, their hopes, and then to discuss and dissect what we see.

It has been an amazing ride — and just as interesting as the actual production have been the interactions with audiences during the release. Because I made the film for anyone who has ever been 11, or will soon be, we cast the net very wide in attracting very diverse audiences. Many parents come see the film with their children, and it promotes insightful discussions among families, educators, students and those interested in a global perspective on our world.

I AM ELEVEN has inspired and provided me endless insight, not only into our world, but also into our future. The audience response has also been overwhelmingly positive, and it has thrilled me to see so many people connect with a very DIY and low-budget documentary. We played for a record 26 weeks in theaters in Melbourne, Australia, and it is a dream come true to now release in the U.S.

henrik nordstrom

I will never forget the reaction of a young girl from Cleveland, Ohio, who boldly put her hand up in front of hundreds of cinemagoers at the international premiere. She said, “What you have done is very interesting. Most documentary filmmakers choose to show us what is going wrong in the world, but you have chosen to show us what is going right. As kids we want to know about the good stuff!” I became quite emotional, and asked her age. “I am 11,” she said. Of course she is.

Our company is called Proud Mother Pictures. My partner Henrik Nordstrom and I gave it that name. Our films are like our babies: we make them, raise them up, send them out in to the world and hope they have a great life and are warmly received and embraced by others.

So when people ask me, “Why 11?”, I always want to ask what that age meant to them. I don’t think you could watch I AM ELEVEN without finding your own answer.

We would love to share your story with the world. You are invited to take a photo of yourself like these featured on our website and we will include your memory here. www.wheniwaseleven.com

***

You can find out more about I AM ELEVEN here, and join the international community on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram #iameleven. Please share this story with someone you knew when you were 11.

Like Us On Facebook |
Follow Us On Twitter |
Contact HuffPost Parents

Also on HuffPost:


Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

An Interview with Andrei Sannikov on the HBO Documentary, Dangerous Acts Starring the Unstable Elements of Belarus

The tensions between Ukraine and Russia make the news daily, but in Belarus, a regime has been in place for 20 years, imprisoning opposition, or eliminating it altogether. Andrei Sannikov, now in exile in Warsaw, Poland, attempted to run against President Alexander Lukashenko. After participating in a protest, he was imprisoned and tortured. On June 24, in Warsaw’s Museum of the History of the Polish Jews, I had the opportunity to talk to Andrei Sannikov about his exile in Poland and the documentary film about the suppression of free speech in his home country, Dangerous Acts Starring the Unstable Elements of Belarus, directed by Madeleine Sackler, to air on HBO.

What are you doing here in Warsaw?

I am in exile now, at first I was in the UK, but now I am here to stay closer to Belarus. My friends are here. My team is here. Some key people had to flee the country. Some people were lucky to escape before they were arrested. One of the journalists, an editor in chief of one of the most popular websites, Charter 97, was under house arrest but she escaped. I never thought I would ever think about leaving my country. We are not in control of our lives anymore.

The government knows you are here. Do they demand your return?

Formally, I am not under any legal obligations. Formally, I was released. I did not escape from prison. Of course they follow what I am doing. They might think at some moment they could demand some proceedings against me. So far no. Belarus is my subject, since I am a trained diplomat I am used to using my contacts to explain my situation. I am writing, working on a book now. It will be published in Belarus. In prison I wrote fairy tales for my son, and I did not think that even fairy tales would be published in Belarus.

What made you agree to participate in Madeleine Sackler’s film?

I did not agree. I was not asked. She came to my sister in London, near where I was living, for an interview. I have to promote the case for free speech, for freedom in general in Belarus. You should ask me, what made me do a Skype interview at 2:30 in the morning, for the D.C. premier. But I negotiated because they wanted me to speak after the movie, at 4 AM. We agreed on an intro.

So, what did you say to introduce the film?

There is no freedom in Belarus, but there are freedom fighters, and you see them in the movie, people in the streets of Minsk demanding freedom. There is no doubt that the origins of the Kremlin regime are the same. Now we see the situation in the Ukraine where there is suffering because of the war the Kremlin unleashed there. And the world needs to help them defend their freedom. There will be no freedom until such regimes are put down, even for the Ukraine. The goal is obvious. We have to do everything to free Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, and it is doable, because even though in Belarus there is a ruthless dictator, it is possible. At the end I said that I hope if we will be serious in our efforts, and if we succeed, then Madeleine will make another movie called “Coming Home,” meaning Belarus coming to Europe. This is the issue because Russia wants to take us to Eurasia.

A provocation: Isn’t political theater propaganda, antithetical to art?

I know what propaganda theater is. The regime took authors approved by the Communists like Mayakovsky or others who are not dissidents and show their fight for creativity and freedom. I don’t have this division. Theater is theater, if talent is shown, even if it promotes things I cannot agree with. The Belarus Free Theater did not start with political theater, and even then, they could not do it officially. Dictators do not trust independent artists, so every independent artist is a potential threat. All artists have to be approved by the regime: therefore, there is a union of writers, a union of artists, a union of musicians, composers, and only those members are permitted to function. So from the beginning they did not allow Belarus Free Theater to do anything legally, so they started underground theater.

The question is strange. Would you consider Havel a propaganda playwright? He was writing about politics, life under a totalitarian system. Propaganda has a negative connotation but it actually promotes some values. I am all for it. I went to the Belarus Free Theater performances in Minsk, in a small space, maybe 30-40 people. But I saw the reactions of the people, the emotions. That was very important to me, especially in our situation which is quite gloomy. When people come to see something that is very alive and can make you think and get you to react emotionally it is very important.

In Belarus in the mid-1990’s, with the breakup of the Soviet Union, there was so much promise for freedom. What happened?

I too was encouraged in the mid 90’s: the general trend was quite incredible, and then we overlooked the dangers of a dictatorship. We have a man in power for 20 years. He was not taken seriously, but he started to build his dictatorship very early. He started to kill his opponents. The regime killed all the opponents who were more popular than Lukashenko.

What do you hope the film, Dangerous Acts Starring the Unstable Elements of Belarus will accomplish?

To let the world know. This is the 21st century, the time of the Internet. To realize there is a dictatorship that does not allow you to live in your country! I was born in Minsk. At my age, I don’t like to be in a foreign country no matter how nice it is. I love Poland, the UK, America but I want to live in Minsk.

I know that everything is possible. I was in the foreign ministry in the mid ’90’s, doing a lot in the state. We had friends. Now we have enemies. Unfortunately, we have to continue to do what Solidarity in Poland did, what the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia did. But I now realize, without help from the democratic world, it will not be possible to achieve the same results. Will we have maidans in Belarus?, I am often asked. That is the square in Ukraine where demonstrations took place. We had huge protests for several years, ignored by the world. Unlike Ukraine, the world did not get involved.

You said you are traveling tomorrow. Where to?

I am going to the 3rd biggest theater festival, in the Czech Republic. They will perform the play based on the fairy tale I wrote in prison for my son, called “Flying Through the Rainbow,” about a little mouse who dreams of flying through the rainbow and all his friends help to realize this dream. My son was 3 ½ when I started writing. Seven now, he is going to see it for the first time, but he knows the contents.

A version of this post also appears on Gossip Central.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

The Roger Ebert Documentary ‘Life Itself’ Shines At Sundance

As I write this fourth update, I have now seen 15 movies at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. (I should add: I am very, very tired.) I’ve been sitting at my computer for the last 10 minutes trying to think of some fun anecdote to share, but, honestly, I can’t remember much of anything right now, so let’s just get to the movies. Movies that include one of the most special films at the festival, the Roger Ebert documentary, “Life Itself.”

“Life Itself”

life itself

“Life Itself,” a title that was taken from Roger Ebert’s autobiography, chronicles the life of the famed film critic – including the last few months of Ebert’s life in, at times, ghastly detail. It’s heartbreaking to see Ebert in such poor shape for those last few months, especially contrasted with the guy who used to be so full of life. But even in those final months, Ebert’s writing was still very much full of life.

I don’t want to paint “Life Itself” as a sad film. There’s a sequence where outtakes are shown of Ebert and Gene Siskel filming a television promo that are downright hilarious. Thankfully, a lot of time is spent on Siskel (who died in 1999) and the strange relationship the two shared. It was Siskel’s insistence on hiding the severity of his condition from Ebert -– Ebert had been hurt that he wasn’t in Siskel’s inner circle concerning his condition — that led Ebert to be as open as possible about his future medical conditions.

It’s a shame Ebert didn’t live to see this film released, but in an interview conducted for the film, he was fairly sure that he would never live to see the finished film. “Life Itself” will take you through the emotional gauntlet. No, Ebert wasn’t a saint and this documentary doesn’t sugarcoat that fact. But it does give us a look at this man who lived an extraordinary life and inspired so many. “Life Itself” is one of the best films at Sundance.

“Laggies”

laggies

When “Laggies” begins, it almost feels like a distant cousin to “Bridesmaids.” (Note: I am in no way comparing “Laggies” to “Bridesmaids,” just the first ten minutes.) There are some laughs! I laughed a few times! Keira Knightly plays Megan, a woman with an advanced degree, yet who is content doing not much of anything with her career. After her best friend’s wedding, during which her boyfriend (Mark Webber) unsuccessfully tries to propose, she’s asked by a high school student, Annika (Chloë Grace Moretz), to buy Annika and her other underage friends some alcohol. Megan agrees, then moves in with Annika and falls in love with Annika’s dad (Sam Rockwell). Yes, the plot of this movie is as dumb as that sounds.

Again, there are some legitimately funny scenes, but “Laggies” suffers from way too many “Nobody in real life would ever make the decisions that these characters do” moments. Annika, a stranger, calls Megan and asks Megan to pose as her mother for a meeting at the principal’s office. With no hesitation, Megan agrees. Nobody would ever agree to that! Who are these people? You know what? Never mind, I don’t want to know.

“To Be Takei”

to be takei

I had no idea that George Takei had worked with John Wayne. “To Be Takei” is filled with enough footage and fun facts like that one to satisfy the weary popular culture connoisseur – and, yes, there’s a lot of “Star Trek” – but the film focuses mostly on Takei’s extraordinary post-“Trek” life, in which he’s become one of the leading voices in the LGBT movement.

If you’ve paid attention to Takei’s life, I’m not sure there’s a lot here that someone wouldn’t know – Takei has discussed his unfortunate time in a Japanese internment camp during World War II many times in the past – but Takei just emits joy. It’s impossible to watch Takei speak and not feel some sort of happiness. The film is sprinkled with interviews with the rest of the living “Star Trek” cast, including William Shatner who, honestly, comes off as an asshole. (I can see why when Takei told Shatner to “get off your high horse” at a celebrity roast, he states he wasn’t joking.)

Regardless, Takei has lived a fascinating life and makes for a great case study, even if you don’t know the difference between a Klingon and a Romulan.

Mike Ryan is senior writer for Huffington Post Entertainment. You can contact him directly on Twitter.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!