Critic’s Notebook: Hip-Hop Rivalries Aren’t New. But the Battlefields Have Changed.

Tensions between the most prominent figures of rap were once confined to music. The social media era demands another approach.
NYT > Arts

SPECIAL TRAVEL DISCOUNTS:
Orbitz Worldwide Inc

nothing,nowhere. Blends Hip-Hop and Emo to Make Tomorrow’s Pop

Joe Mulherin is part of an emerging group of artists that is bridging the chasm between rap and rock. His debut is one of the most promising albums of the year.
NYT > Arts

SPECIAL TRAVEL DISCOUNTS:
Orbitz Worldwide Inc

"The Platinum Life": The Elite Women of Hip-Hop

Meet the queens of the hip hop scene this October. The new series premieres Sunday, October 15 at 10|9c on E!
E! Online Videos

SHOPPING TIP UPDATE!

How Kurt Cobain’s Iconic Sunglasses Became a Hip-Hop Style Obsession

There’s a reason you’re seeing them everywhere right now.

Style – Esquire

SHOPPING DEALS UPDATE:


Americans Finally Like Hip-Hop And R&B More Than Rock ‘N’ Roll

Took you guys long enough.
Entertainment News, Photos and Videos – HuffPost Entertainment
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Slick Rick Praises The First-Ever Global Hip-Hop Day

June 8 marks Global Hip-Hop Day, during which we celebrate the global and cultural impact of the genre that was started some 40 years ago

The first-ever event, which is held in conjunction with the NYC Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, the office of The Bronx Borough President, and New York radio station Hot 97, will take place in the Bronx and will commemorate hip-hop’s ability to unite people and create positive impact around the globe.

During the day, there will be a public proclamation and unveiling of Hip-Hop Boulevard at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue, which is the birthplace of hip-hop and home of legendary hip-hop pioneer Kool Herc.

The special ceremony will also recognize Fat Joe, Slick Rick, Kool Herc and The Lox as this year’s of ICON honorees for their vast musical contributions.

For legendary rapper Slick Rick, Global Hip-Hop Day will help solidify the future of the genre’s place in society.

“It’s a good thing, because hip-hop is due recognition,” Rick said in an interview with HuffPost. “And it’s addressing the influence it has over modern day youth and the future of modern society.”

The English-born MC ― who’s known for his charismatic style and vivid storytelling lyrics ― rose to hip-hop prominence in the 80s with the release of his critically acclaimed debut 1988 album, “The Great Adventures of Slick Rick.”

As one of New York’s longstanding hip-hop radio stations, Hot 97’s SVP/Market Manager of Emmis New York​, Charlie Morgan said that the station aims to celebrate the extension of hip-hop’s global reach.

“We want to both honor the origins of hip-hop music and the hip-hop culture as being born and bred in New York City, specifically the Bronx,” Morgan told HuffPost. “At the same time, we want to celebrate the global reach and impact of this native New York art form. Hot 97 is proud of our heritage and role as the first hip-hop radio station, as well as the role we are playing in the global expansion of this music with the international expansion of Summer Jam and global distribution of Hot 97 online.”

Rick said he’d like for hip-hop to unite fans on topics such as foreign affairs.

“It could be a pulpit for the modern day youth to express its opinions about issues ― global warming, foreign affairs ― as far as how to get along without all the unrest and stuff like that,” he said.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Miley Cyrus Responds To Backlash Over Comments About Hip-Hop Music

Miley Cyrus took to social media Saturday to clarify controversial comments she made about rap and hip-hop music in a recent Billboard cover interview.

After talking to the magazine about her new music and her rekindled love for Liam Hemsworth, Cyrus said she “can’t listen to” rap music anymore.

“That’s what pushed me out of the hip-hop scene a little,” she continued. “It was too much ‘Lamborghini, got my Rolex, got a girl on my cock’ — I am so not that.”

People quickly responded online, criticizing Cyrus for the ease with which she could discard a genre that had demonstrably influenced and propelled her previous public persona.

“When articles are read it isn’t always considered that for hours I’ve spoken with a journalist about my life, where my heart is, my perspective at that time, and the next step in my career,” Cyrus began an Instagram caption posted Saturday. “Unfortunately only a portion of that interview made it to print.”

“To be clear, I respect ALL artists who speak their truth and appreciate ALL genres of music (country, pop, alternative … but in this particular interview I was asked about rap),” she continued. “I have always and will continue to love and celebrate hip hop as I’ve collaborated with some of the very best!”  

It sounds like the singer’s intentions were good, but even with the added clarification, Cyrus doesn’t address the crux of much of the criticism — namely, how easily she felt she could don, and subsequently shed, sound and aesthetics borrowed from black culture and music. 

During the time of her 2013 release, “Bangerz,” Cyrus capitalized on the rising trap scene to cement her transition from Disney teen to full-fledged adult singer.

As HuffPost’s Zeba Blay pointed out, “What’s incredibly telling is how, once she achieved that success, it seemed like the plan was always to discard hip-hop music and black culture like the costume that it was,” also noting “how convenient it is for her to call out hip-hop’s misogyny” after trafficking in those same tropes for earlier iterations of her act.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

The Grammys Fumble Hip-Hop and R&B. Here’s How to Fix It.

The rap and R&B categories have been mishandled for years by the Recording Academy, which overlooks innovation and confuses genres.
NYT > Arts

SPECIAL TRAVEL DISCOUNTS:
Orbitz Worldwide Inc

Listen To The Spoof Of Ben Carson’s Hip-Hop Radio Ad

STRAIGHT FIRE … would be less painful on your ears.

Dr. Ben Carson’s presidential campaign released a cringeworthy hip-hop song last week called “Freedom.” The radio spot is slated to air over the next two weeks in Detroit, Atlanta, Memphis, and in several other markets with large black populations. If you haven’t heard the actual ad, listen to it here for free (although it might cost you your appreciation of rap music forever).

The blame for this audible torture shouldn’t be assigned solely to Ben Carson, nor to its rapper, Aspiring Mogul. No, the real offender here is Carson’s campaign manager; whoever was behind the scenes making this nightmare a reality.

Unfortunately for music lovers, Carson’s campaign manager decided to drop a track of his own. This follow-up rap radio ad, titled “Panderdom,” is much less subtle in attempting to appeal to young, black voters. Listen to the parody below.

Also on HuffPost:

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

Hip-Hop Dancers

Hip-Hop Dancers


Children will love the comical photographs of animals in different hip-hop dance positions! Dancing lemurs, bunnies, chimpanzees, and elephants groove to a simple rhyme pattern in this entertaining book. Children are asked to choose the hip-hop animal they think is the best dancer, as well as the animal or group of animals having the most fun.

Price: $
Sold by Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

Alternative, Country, Hip-Hop, Rap, and More: Music from the 1980s to Today

Alternative, Country, Hip-Hop, Rap, and More: Music from the 1980s to Today


New – With music today available on YouTube, online and satellite radio, MTV, through digital downloads, and on iPods and other handheld devices, we may think that we have heard all there is to hear about modern artists. The stories behind the songs that keep us humming are less often explored. Readers will learn how some of the most popular musicians todayentertainers such as Madonna, Adele, Kanye West, and Taylor Swiftrose to fame and made important musical breakthroughs, all while paying trib

Price: $
Sold by Alibris UK: books, movies

Rap Gods POSTER hip-hop Eminem Biggie Nelly Jay-z 2pac Sold by Our Campus Market

Rap Gods POSTER hip-hop Eminem Biggie Nelly Jay-z 2pac Sold by Our Campus Market


Rap Gods POSTER hip-hop Eminem Biggie Nelly Jay-z 2pac * Item Type: Mini Poster
List Price: $ 4.99
Price: $ 4.99

Muslim Women’s Hip-Hop Collective Confronts Stereotypes And Breaks Up The Boys’ Club

A new collective of hip-hop and spoken word artists are taking on stereotypes one rhyme at a time in the Bay Area.

Earlier this month, The Hijabi Chronicles, a collective of female artists of the Muslim faith, launched via their first event at La Peña Cultural Center in Berkeley, California. It is said to be the first event of its kind in California, if not nationwide.

Alia Sharrief, the group’s founder, explained to AJ+ in a video Monday that the objective of the group is convey that Muslim women belong in hip-hop, even if the genre has traditionally been male-dominated as well as generally frowned upon in more conservative corners of the Muslim community.

“We’re knowledgeable, we have rhymes, we have soul and we have something to say,” Sharrief told AJ+.

Sharrief, who was born and raised in Sacramento and lives in the Bay Area, released her debut album, “Mental Cycles and Mood Swings,” in 2012. Her second album, “Back On My Deen,” is on the way and its first single, “Who Ready,” was released in February. The song’s music video is inspired by Malcolm X.

Sharrief and other artists associated with the collective make it a point to address current issues, particularly as they relate to matters of race and gender.

“I rhyme about helping people, protesting, speaking up for humanity, having dignity, and self respect to say the least,” Sharrief wrote last year in a feature on Muslimah Montage, an online platform for Muslim women.

In another video, released last fall, Sharrief and fellow artist Aminah Bell responded to rapper Iggy Azalea, who some have criticized for cultural appropriation, over the beat of Azalea’s “Black Widow.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Street fashion hiphop punk accessories acrylic cherry stud earring neon big earrings

Street fashion hiphop punk accessories acrylic cherry stud earring neon big earrings


Street fashion hiphop punk accessories acrylic cherry stud earring neon big earrings
List Price:
Price:

SonReal And What It’s Like Being A White Rapper In A Post-Macklemore Hip-Hop Scene

It isn’t very often that weird humor and hip-hop mix. The Beasties Boys and The Fat Boys were two of the first to embrace comedy hip-hop in the 1980s, a conceit that was picked up by Eminem in the ’90s, and current acts like Childish Gambino, Macklemore, Odd Future and Lil Dicky within the last decade.

But one of the most recent artists to throw his silly hat into the ring is Canada’s SonReal. Releasing his “Everywhere We Go” music video just over a year ago, the Juno-nominated rapper seems to pay homage to the uncomfortable awkwardness and absurd nerdy stylings of “Napoleon Dynamite.” Accumulating nearly 1.5 million views on YouTube — “One million views in Canada is more like 100 million in the States” — comedy feels like a natural fit for SonReal. But with mixtapes hailing back to 2006, this goofy tone is actually a first.

“I think we created a whole new side to my personality with that video,” SonReal told The Huffington Post. “A lot of people didn’t even really think I was funny before that. A lot of my stuff was a little more serious, maybe some people would categorize it as emo.”

The video for “Believe,” off his most recent free album, “One Long Day,” was purposefully released after “Everywhere We Go” to remind both new and old fans of his more serious side. (SonReal was aware that an art piece wouldn’t go viral.) While the majority of the album floats in this space of self-examination and outreach, SonReal’s latest video for his new track, “Preach,” brings on another wacky, stoic production, shot in 57 different locations throughout the United States.

Born as Aaron Hoffman and raised in Vernon, British Columbia, a small town with a population of 60,000, SonReal grew up expecting to follow in the footsteps of the town’s working populace.

“A lot of the people where I’m from go up north and work on rigs,” he said. “It’s these small town dreams, which is to have a family and try to be rich. That’s what successful is there. There are no rappers around my way, so I really had to break the mold. When I first started, people around me didn’t take me seriously — and so they shouldn’t have, I was horrible at it. But it was definitely harder for me, I think, than somebody growing up in a big city because there was no one within 500 miles of me that had done what I was trying to do.”

Introduced to hip-hop through skateboarding, he fell in love with albums like Nas’ “Illmatic,” Method Man’s “Judgement Day” and Mobb Deep’s “The Infamous.” On his first mixtape, “Trapped In The Streets,” SonReal emulated these artists, rapping about selling drugs and killing people. While he understands he was just trying to find his place in hip-hop, SonReal is thankful that little beyond the music was documented. “I’m so happy I didn’t have a YouTube account at the time because I would have so many videos that are so bad,” he said.

“It takes time to find out what you want to say and who you want to be,” SonReal continued. “At the end of the day is just comes back to ‘do you.’ I have always said I want to be around for a long time, so we’ve taken our time with things and made sure they’re perfect. One thing about me is that I’ve never been really amazing right off the jump. I’m not someone who just comes out with a smash album right at the start. I’m consistently working to get better at my music. ‘One Long Day’ is my best work today, but my new stuff is already turning out to be way more energetic. I’m excited about it.”

As SonReal continues to rise — and headlines his first tours throughout the United States — the comparisons to Macklemore feel unfortunately inevitable. In addition to both men being white rappers, they share a goofy-sincere sensibility. But for those willing to really listen, SonReal’s work exudes its own unique talent. In fact, it’s what many of his fans know already: SonReal has his own flow, his own style, his own message. And he’s pretty damn good at it.

before the beat drops

Before The Beat Drops is an artist introduction series dedicated to bringing you the rising acts before they make their break. Our unlimited access to music of all kinds is both amazing and overwhelming. Keeping your playlists fresh, we’ll be doing the leg work to help you discover your next favorite artist.
Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Logic’s ‘Under Pressure’ Is 2014’s Best Hip-Hop Album So Far

When you release a series of acclaimed mixtapes like the “Young Sinatra” series, and the time for your major debut has come, pressure tends to build. When your sister calls you crying because she can’t shake the memory of the man who raped her — and she’s popping pills because she thinks she’s repeating the same mistakes as your mother — pressure tends to build. When you’re dad, who was absent for almost all of your life, addicted to crack cocaine, calls asking you to stop rapping about his addiction and also requests money for his new girlfriend, pressure tends to build.

This is the world of Logic, and the many adversities he’s encountered during the first 24 years of his life could have kept the Maryland-born rapper anchored below the surface. But what would seem a cage to almost anyone –the once “literal underground artist” spent his mixtape years living and recording in his friend’s basement, which is depicted on his new album’s cover — was not: The travails of Logic’s life became an oubliette, and when enough pressure comes in contact with the right body, the result is a diamond.

To say Logic’s “Under Pressure” lived up to its hype would be an understatement. Throughout the album’s 12 tracks, Logic continues to demonstrate that he has one of the top five flows in the game. He also amps up his production chops, providing tracks that comfortably stand in line with Visionary Music Group’s sawed-off shotgun that is in-house producer 6ix and the record’s other contributors.

“It’s where I truly found myself, as an artist, as a young man, who I want to be, how I want to be perceived,” Logic told The Huffington Post. “The first thing you hear is the homage to Tribe Called Quest, you hear this computerized voice that is similar to ‘Midnight Marauders.’ The difference in mine is that I gave her a name, and her name is Thalia, one of nine sisters and daughters of the Greek god Zeus. Thalia was the muse of music, so it’s like it’s my muse taking you through all these cool little tidbits and fun facts about how the album was created. And overall, it’s a coming-of-age story about a young man growing into the man you see today and all the things I had to go through. From coming up broke, Section 8 housing, my mom and dad dealing with their drug addiction and alcoholism and them not ever being married, so my dad not really being around, and just all the things I witnessed.”

From the piano-led crooner that is “Intro” to the glitching vocal beat of “I’m Gone” to the hollow trap of “Nikki,” Logic pulls equally from golden age and new class artists, creating a 56-minute head-bobber that carefully balances its raps and beats. It’s the title track that captures the album at its most essential, featuring almost six extra minutes from the single version. In the addition, there are voicemails from his sister, brother and father, as well as Logic’s reply, revealing his struggle to let and keep his family in his life. “They say family is everything, I swear that shit the truth / I should spend it all with y’all, but I spend it in the booth / This is everything I love, this is everything I need / Never sacrifice this feeling even though my heart it bleed,” Logic raps. “Under Pressure” received an accompanying video that gives insight into what Logic wants listeners to take from the album.

“The whole thing really is deep,” Logic said. “The song and album ‘Under Pressure’ obviously hints diamonds, so the entire thing is a diamond heist, so it’s almost like breaking into the game. You’re trying to take out the best rappers, and not by dissing, but by your achievements. For me it’s almost like a Robin Hood story. Some people see it as violent, but it’s like, okay, you could take it there, but it’s a metaphor. It’s not like I’m chipping off heads or whatever. You go through all these obstacles, literally the ups and downs of all you go through to get these diamonds, and then go spread that to the world.

Another intriguing element to “Under Pressure” is the lack of any features from any other artists, a very uncommon occurrence for a hip-hop studio record.

“I wanted to create something that was just mine, my story,” Logic said. “I haven’t met Kendrick [Lamar] yet, but he’s someone I could envision on this record, or J. Cole, Nas, all these great people. And then I was with Don Cannon and he was like, not talking about anyone specifically, ‘Man, fuck everybody. This is your story. This what you have waited all your life to tell and you should tell it on your own.’ I thought about it, and realized he was right. I don’t need a cosign. It doesn’t matter who you are, being on this album isn’t going to help me sell records. They are going to listen to Logic because they like Logic. They might buy that single or that one track, but they’re not going to get the album. I decided I don’t need that, I don’t want that, I just want to tell my story, and then work with all the homies afterwards.”

As for other artists who are experiencing the same struggles that he encountered in his life, Logic has some suggestions for how they can take their art to the next level:

The first thing you have to do is get out of your city. Wherever you are, get the hell out of there because you will not shine, you will only be known as local talent. Word hard and be dedicated, but don’t be a fake hard worker. You can’t be at the club the whole time and pretend like you’re in the studio. You literally have to make it your everything. Kanye West, Sinatra, Michael Jackson, all the greatest of the greats have made their craft their everything. Made it their life and sacrificed years to be the best. You also need a team. It’s not about money, so don’t think about that first, it will come later. Be a good person, be kind and shake everybody’s hand in the room. If you don;t know about business, find somebody out there that knows about business and have them teach you the business while they’re working the business for you. Be smart and hopefully things will work out for you.

“Under Pressure” is undeniably the best hip-hop album of 2014 so far. This might only be Logic’s debut, but “Under Pressure” is the kind of record that listeners will look back upon 10 years from now with great fondness. Talent will make an artist famous, but it’s the courage, perseverance and kindness that Logic embodies that make an artist last.


Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

You laugh monkey doll hiphop monkey wedding doll filmsize doll plush toy birthday gift

You laugh monkey doll hiphop monkey wedding doll filmsize doll plush toy birthday gift


Cheap Stuffed & Plush Animals on Sale at Bargain Price, Buy Quality plushed toys, baby toys stuffed toy, baby smart soft toy from China plushed toys Suppliers at Aliexpress.com:1,Color:Gray,Purple,Blue 2,Toy type:explaines / nano-doll 3,Item Type:Animals 4,external material:explaines 5,Features:Stuffed & Plush
List Price:
Price:

Ja Rule Hiphop Rap Music Star Signed Autograph Posed 8×10 Photo Jsa Coa #j67101

Ja Rule Hiphop Rap Music Star Signed Autograph Posed 8×10 Photo Jsa Coa #j67101


JA RULE HIPHOP RAP MUSIC STAR SIGNED AUTOGRAPH POSED 8X10 PHOTO JSA COA #J67101
List Price: $ 92.94
Price: $ 84.95

Hip-Hop Hits – Vocal Music with CD Pro Vocal Series Volume 31

Hip-Hop Hits – Vocal Music with CD Pro Vocal Series Volume 31


Pro Vocal Series Volume 31 Series: Pro Vocal Medium: Softcover with CD Artist: Various Artists Whether you’re a karaoke singer or preparing for an audition, the Pro Vocal series is for you. The book contains the lyrics, melody, and chord symbols for eight classic songs. The CD contains demos for listening and separate backing tracks so you can sing along. The CD is playable on any CD, but it is also enhanced for PC and Mac computer users so you can adjust the recording to any pitch without changing the tempo! Perfect for home rehearsal, parties, auditions, corporate events, and gigs without a backup band. This volume includes: California Love (Remix) ? Can I Get A… ? Gin and Juice ? Holla Holla ? Hot in Herre ? Hypnotize ? I Know What You Want ? The Real Slim Shady.Table of Contents: California Love (Remix) Can I Get A… Gin And Juice Holla Holla Hot In Herre Hypnotize I Know What You Want The Real Slim Shady

Price: $
Sold by Cascio Interstate Music

Wholesale – Hiphop trend accessories hip-hop accessories good wood nyc wood diamond pendant necklace

Wholesale – Hiphop trend accessories hip-hop accessories good wood nyc wood diamond pendant necklace


Hiphop trend accessories hip-hop accessories good wood nyc wood diamond pendant necklace
List Price:
Price:

hip-hop wall clock: the elements of Hip-Hop Music Wall Clock by CafePress

hip-hop wall clock: the elements of Hip-Hop Music Wall Clock by CafePress


hip-hop wall clock, the elements of hip-hop, hip hop accessories, hiphop, graffiti, emcee, d.j., break-dance, hip hop clock Music Wall Clock Decorate any room in your home or office with our 10 inch wall clock. Black plastic case. Requires 1 AA battery included.
List Price: 14.0
Price:

Ja Rule Hiphop Rap Music Star Signed Autographed B/w 8×10 Photo Jsa Coa #j67100

Ja Rule Hiphop Rap Music Star Signed Autographed B/w 8×10 Photo Jsa Coa #j67100


JA RULE HIPHOP RAP MUSIC STAR SIGNED AUTOGRAPHED B/W 8X10 PHOTO JSA COA #J67100
List Price: $ 92.98
Price: $ 84.98

Gotta Get Signed: How to Become a Hip-Hop Producer

Gotta Get Signed: How to Become a Hip-Hop Producer


King lays out the steps one must take to learn the art and craft of hip-hop production. He begins with a brief history of the genre, explains the roles of a producer and beat-maker, how to build a studio, assemble a production team, and promote the music. He also reveals invaluable information about how advance-against-royalty deals work.

Price: $
Sold by Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

Ja Rule Hiphop Rap Music Star Signed Autographed 8×10 Photo Jsa Coa #j67099

Ja Rule Hiphop Rap Music Star Signed Autographed 8×10 Photo Jsa Coa #j67099


JA RULE HIPHOP RAP MUSIC STAR SIGNED AUTOGRAPHED 8X10 PHOTO JSA COA #J67099
List Price: $ 92.98
Price: $ 84.98