India Fashion Week: A New Sponsor — and a New Strategy

NEW DELHI — India Fashion Week here for the first time went direct to consumer, indicating the country’s changing fashion market.
The fashion week, the first four days of which were dedicated to retail buyers, also came with a new sponsor and a new name — the Lotus Makeup India Fashion Week, or LMIFW.
“The event kept the tradition of buyer sale for the first four days and added a new dimension for public sale on the penultimate two days at the same venue,” Sunil Sethi, president of the Fashion Design Council of India, or FDCI, told WWD. FDCI is the organizer of the event, which closed Oct. 15. “In its 19 years of existence, the FDCI has never thought of doing a B2C show. We have always been about business-to-business, and we are just adding on a new dimension,” he added.
Describing the changing retail market, and a year in which many designers have slowed the opening of their own stores, he said the last two days included past seasons’ designs and old inventory. “Many of the designers have been talking about the pain in retail, about downsizing a bit and reengineering their operations. In the factories, people are reassessing what to do this

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Books of The Times: A Novel That Roiled India Is Now Translated Into English

In Perumal Murugan’s “One Part Woman,” a religious festival allows childless women to sleep with men other than their husbands, in the hope of becoming pregnant.
NYT > Books

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Hollywood to Bollywood: #MeToo gains traction in India

The #MeToo movement has expanded from Hollywood to Bollywood, with top Indian film stars and politicians being accused of sexual assault.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

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Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas’ Families to Meet in India for Engagement Party

Nick Jonas, Priyanka ChopraChopras, meet the Jonases!
Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas will soon return to her native India, this time as an engaged couple, to attend an engagement party hosted by her family, which…

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Does Zegna, Reliance Investment in Rathore Show New Phase for India Luxury Market?

The investment by Ermenegildo Zegna and Reliance Brands in Indian men’s wear designer Raghavendra Rathore marks a series of firsts for all the companies involved — and could signal a major turning point in global companies’ attitude toward Indian fashion.
The investment is the first in an Indian brand by both Zegna and Reliance, while for Rathore it represents another milestone in his career that could help turn him into a designer name recognized worldwide.
Rathore is well-known in the luxury men’s space in India for his tailoring and interpretation of the traditional men’s formalwear bandhgala, breeches and tapered waist coats — with a focus on both sophistication and style. (A bandhgala, which is said to have originated from Jodhpur, is part of Indian formalwear with its high collar, front buttons, and formfitting style.) Designers — many of whom are strongly independent and resist any steering by investors — are interested to see how the growth of his brand pans out with the new investors.
Rathore currently sells his Jodhpur brand in seven stores in India and also has a lower priced line, Imperial India Company. But it is the luxury aspect that the Zegna-Reliance brands’ investment will fuel, focusing on the fast-growing

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Top Architecture Prize Goes to Low-Cost Housing Pioneer From India

Balkrishna Doshi, who won this year’s Pritzker Prize, asks: “What is the role of an architect today, or are we going to be useful to the society at large?”
NYT > Arts

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The Rice of Royals: Where to Find the Tastiest Biryani in India

You can find biryani, the savory Indian dish of fluffy rice, meat and spices, all over India, but the city of Hyderabad serves the best. Here, 6 spots to start your tasting tour.
WSJ.com: Lifestyle

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Anger as India doctor mistakenly declares newborn dead

The error was found when the baby’s parents saw him move en route to the funeral in India.
BBC News – Health
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On the Runway: In India, Ivanka Trump Tried on Some Fashion Diplomacy. Was it a Good Look?

The assistant to the president became the first member of the Trump administration to try to use clothes as political capital.
NYT > Fashion & Style

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In India, Fashion Has Become a Nationalist Cause

For the last three years the government has championed traditional dress, like the sari made in a Hindu holy city.
NYT > Fashion & Style

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Books of The Times: Arundhati Roy’s Long-Awaited Novel Is an Ambitious Look at Turmoil in India

“The Ministry of Utmost Happiness” comes 20 years after Roy’s celebrated debut novel, “The God of Small Things.”
NYT > Books

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A Nature-Focused Escape in Southern India

A solo traveler forgoes India’s mobbed bucket-list attractions in favor of secluded resorts and nature treks in the country’s sleepy south.
WSJ.com: Lifestyle

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The Look: Capturing the Colorful Style of Punjab, India

“People in Punjab wear very bright, vibrant colors,” said Mark Hartman, a photographer based in Brooklyn who spent March in India. “To me, it shows a sense of pride and confidence.”
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Fern Mallis Flies to India to Secure Christian Louboutin for Fashion Icons Series at 92Y

EXPRESS TO INDIA: Fern Mallis will go to great lengths to line up guests for her Fashion Icons series — so much so she took a 15-hour flight to New Delhi last year to invite Christian Louboutin.
The shoe designer will join her at 92Y May 17. While Mallis had only met Louboutin to say hello here and there over the years, she said Wednesday, “You can safely say I went to India to secure this.”
During a dinner last fall in New York, her friend Sabyasachi Mukherjee, a designer from India, mentioned that he was doing a shoe collaboration with Louboutin. After learning that the shoe designer was on her wish list for 92Y speakers, he promised to invited her to the launch. In November, Mallis flew to New Delhi for the weekend to attend the launch dinner where she was seated next to Louboutin. After chatting about her talk series, she dropped off a copy of her book “Fashion Icons” at his hotel the following day and turned up for the official launch later. “I would go anywhere to support Sabyasachi but my purpose was totally to spend some time with Christian and secure this interview,” Mallis said.
Having visited India

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The Blend of the Traditional and Contemporary Dominates Amazon India Fashion Week

NEW DELHI, India — While the fashion  silhouette changed this season at the 29th edition of Amazon India Fashion Week Winter 2017, held in association with Maybelline New York, the shows opened with a focus on how to blend traditional craft with contemporary design.
The first show of the week, featuring 13 designers, focused on using handlooms in modern fashion. A collaborative effort between the Fashion Design Council of India and the Handloom School supported by retailer Good Earth showcased work by designers including Rohit Bal, Rajesh Pratap, Singh Suket Dhir, Raw Mango, Akaaro, Antar-Agni, Eka, Pero and Urvashi Kaur.
As Sunil Sethi, president of the Fashion Design Council of India, observed, the event dedicated to India’s handlooms and textiles did indeed make a “giant leap in the legacy to promote the homespun.”
Anita Lal, founder of The Good Earth Co., said, “We’ve never participated in fashion shows. But we realized that in order to popularize the concept of handloom it has to be seen as something desirable, something that has a certain appeal to younger people, which is why we did the fashion show and sponsored.”
Textile minister Smriti Irani, who was at the event, observed that the industry itself was going through

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Apple App Store prices rise in UK, India and Turkey

Apple is raising prices in its UK App Store by 25% to take account of sterling’s drop versus the dollar.
BBC News – Technology

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Books of The Times: Review: ‘Selection Day’ Presents India as Seen Through the Wickets

Aravind Adiga, who won the Booker Prize for “The White Tiger,” has written a cricket novel about two brothers that also sketches a nation in flux.
NYT > Books

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Fast-Food Chains in India Cultivate Untapped Workforce: Women

American fast-food chains have become an unlikely source of female employment and empowerment in India, a country where traditionally most women are kept from working outside the home.
WSJ.com: US Business

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Kate Middleton Showcases Gorgeous Looks on Day 1 of India Trip With Prince William

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, IndiaKate Middleton donned a number of stunning styles as she and husband Prince William began a visit to India.
The two landed in the country Sunday and are also set to travel to the remote…

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Royal Tour Begins in India

TOUCHED DOWN: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge headed to India as part of their seven-day royal tour. The royal couple visited the Taj Mahal Palace hotel and placed white lilies at the memorial. They met with survivors of the Mumbai attacks in 2008. The duchess wore a red printed peplum skirt suit by Alexander McQueen.
They visited the Oval Maiden park and took part in a game of cricket with local children and met representatives of childrens’ charities. She wore a long printed dress by Indian designer Anita Dongre.
Later that evening,they went to a fundraising gala and dinner with Bollywood sports figures. She changed into a blue Jenny Packham gown with hand sewn sequins and Amarapli earrings.

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Softbank’s Investment in India Could Top $10 Billion

The Japanese technology company has already invested $ 2 billion in India in the past year and the pace of investments could accelerate in the future, its chief executive said.
WSJ.com: WSJD

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5000 Designs and Motifs from India By Ajit Mookerjee (Paperback)

5000 Designs and Motifs from India By Ajit Mookerjee (Paperback)


Overview Over the last five thousand years, Indian artists have developed a wide range of unique and decorative artistic styles. This rich collection of copyright-free designs and motifs draws on that heritage to provide today’s artists and designers with a stimulating and practical archive of usable material. In this volume are designs adapted from seals, dolls, and toys of the Harappa culture; punch-marked coins and pottery from South India; Ajanta and Bagh murals; Muslim monuments; Buddhist temples; textiles from Gujarat, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, and other regions; and much more. Embodying the variety and complexity of traditional Indian design, the motifs in this collection will be of immediate use to artists and illustrators as well as providing an exciting glimpse into the rich store of Indian decorative art. Product details Isbn-13: 9780486290614, 978-0486290614 Author: Ajit Mookerjee Publisher: Dover Publications Inc. Publication date: 1996-10-24 About Wordery Wordery is one of the UK’s largest online booksellers. With millions of satisfied customers who enjoy low prices on a huge range of books, we offer a reliable and trusted service and consistently receive excellent feedback. We offer a huge range of over 8 million books; bestsellers, children’s books, cheap paperbacks, baby books, special edition hardbacks and textbooks. All our books are dispatched from the UK. Wordery offers Free Delivery on all UK orders, and competitively priced international delivery. #HappyReading

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Georgette Maroon with Antique Beadwork Kurti/ Tunic (India)

Georgette Maroon with Antique Beadwork Kurti/ Tunic (India)


Add a touch of exotic style to your wardrobe with a kurti from India. This lovely women’s tunic is hand crafted of maroon georgette with antique-style beadwork and has 3/4-length sleeves. Product Features: Measurement Guide Women’s Sizing Guide Story Behind the Art: The Kurtis are made by group of artisans hailing from the state of Bihar in India. To support their families back home they have settled in big cities like Mumbai where they make these beautiful Kurtis. The kurti fabric is woven into beautiful designs on power looms by artisans who have been following the trade for generations, toiling day and night to give the cloth its intrinsic beauty and cool nature. Besides weaving, a fair number of kurtis have further attractive designs embellished on them by skilled artists. Color block printing by hand, hand-painting by talented painters and sewing on bejeweled embellishments by craftsmen to produce unique designs are just some of the efforts that go into making these extremely comfortable and fashionable kurtis. What is Worldstock? The handcrafted touch of artisan skill creates variations in color, size and design. If buying two of the same item, slight differences should be expected. Note: Color discrepancies may occur between this product and your computer screen. Imported

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Amazon Steps Further Into Fashion, to Sponsor India Couture Week

MUMBAI — Amazon India has stepped in as the official title sponsor for another major fashion event, India Couture Week.
The week will open for its sixth season on July 29 and run for five days at the Taj Palace hotel in New Delhi.
A large part of couture in India caters to the huge wedding market, which has long provided the main livelihood for designers.
“We want to work across the fashion spectrum,” Vikram Raizada, director of category management at Amazon India, told WWD, explaining that the e-tailer is extending its association with the Fashion Design Council of India (FDCI) with the sponsorship.
“The association will also help extend the fashion segment further across the 19,000 pin [zip] codes that Amazon reaches across the country,” he said.
RELATED CONTENT: Amazon Opens Its Biggest Fashion Photography Studio in London >>
“This is in line with our vision of transforming the way India sells and shops for fashion online,” Vikas Purohit, head of Amazon Fashion in India.
Amazon India stepped into the fashion limelight as title sponsor of India Fashion Week in March.
India Fashion Week, held twice yearly in New Delhi, is organized by the FDCI, which is the apex body of fashion in India.
Amazon India is among the

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Paying Homage to India: An Interview With Pushcart Prize Nominee, Leeya Mehta

A fundamental concern for others in our individual and community lives would go a long way in making the world the better place we so passionately dreamt of.
-Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela Day was celebrated around the world on July 18th. It is a day to remember the greatness of a man who dedicated his life to helping the world understand democracy, freedom, equality, diversity, reconciliation, and respect.

2015-07-19-1437277250-2048324-NelsonMandelaDay.jpg

Recently, I had the opportunity to connect with, Leeya Mehta, She was a child when Nelson Mandela was released from prison in 1989 after serving his 27-year sentence.

The movement for a democratic South Africa was felt greatly in India whose own independence was achieved just 15 years before Mandela’s sentence began. Leeya Mehta’s school invited leaders of the ANC to come talk to the children. Mehta felt rooted in a culture of nonviolent resistance for change, surrounded by the energy of a new India, and a witness to its diverse cultural and religious traditions.

After earning a Master’s in economics and politics from Oxford University she traveled throughout the world eventually settling in Washington, DC. She was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize for her poem, “The Abduction,” published by the Beloit Poetry Journal.

Here she shares her reflections as a writer and her hopes to pay homage to the diverse cultures, religions, social movements, countries and the people who weave their complexities and contradictions, along with her own, through her poems and essays.

Poem: “David & The Hummingbird”
For Nelson Mandela

Essay: “What kind of society do we want to live In?:
A reflection on crime & punishment.”

Writer’s Process: The Diction of Death & Violence

Poem: ” The Towers of Silence” and Writing For & As The “Other”

Inspiration: India As A Muse

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Arts – The Huffington Post
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The Hand-Book of India, a Guide to the Stranger and the Traveller and a Companion to the Resident. Second Edition.

The Hand-Book of India, a Guide to the Stranger and the Traveller and a Companion to the Resident. Second Edition.


bTitle:/b The Hand-Book of India, a guide to the stranger and the traveller and a companion to the resident. br/br/bPublisher:/b British Library, Historical Print Editionsbr/br/The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is one of the world’s largest research libraries holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats: books, journals, newspapers, sound recordings, patents, maps, stamps, prints and much more. Its collections include around 14 million books, along with substantial additional collections of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 300 BC. br/br/The HISTORY OF TRAVEL collection includes books from the British Library digitised by Microsoft. This collection contains personal narratives, travel guides and documentary accounts by Victorian travelers, male and female. Also included are pamphlets, travel guides, and personal narratives of trips to and around the Americas, the Indies, Europe, Africa and the Middle East. br/br/++++br/The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: br/++++br/br/b/b British Librarybr/b/b Stocqueler, J H.; br/b/b 1845.br/b/b 12

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Never Mind the Bullocks: One Girl's 10,000 km Adventure around India in the World's Cheapest Car

Never Mind the Bullocks: One Girl's 10,000 km Adventure around India in the World's Cheapest Car


A SCOTSMAN NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR

Vanessa Able wanted a truly independent Indian adventure, but nothing prepared her for the noise, chaos and terror of driving 10,000 km around the subcontinent or for finding the love of her life.
Behind the wheel of a yellow Tata Nano (the world s cheapest car), Vanessa steers the reader through a hilarious, high-octane adventure. Taking any help she can get from loopy spiritual gurus to professional driving instructors, and even a divine insurance policy she drives her way around an alien road network through India s white-knuckle traffic where vehicle size, full-beam lights and roads that simply disappear seem to trump all common sense. Narrowly escaping death by truck, she learnsthe real rules of the road, the vehicle pecking order, what to do when the SH11T hits the fan and to appreciate the true kings of the dusty tarmac: the bullocks.
En route, she falls hopelessly in love with a mathematician named Thor who might be, ironically, the worst driver she s ever met. Their romance does not start promisingly the first rendezvous is interrupted by that universal passion-killer, Delhi belly but will they survive unexpected sheep-jams, a car full of elephant slime, and the endless cacophony of horns?
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Silk and Wool ‘Twilight Shimmer’ Shawl (India)

Silk and Wool ‘Twilight Shimmer’ Shawl (India)


This handmade creation is offered in partnership with NOVICA, in association with National Geographic. The soft shimmer of natural silk meets virgin wool for a shawl of extraordinary elegance. By Imtiyaz, the lovely shawl combines enticing shades of purple, brown, dark pink and maroon. Product Features: Story Behind the Art: ‘My grandmother used to weave shawls and then sell them. Since we were a large family, I remember spending most of my time with my grandmother,’ recalls Imtiyaz, from India. ‘She loved me so much. My father weaves shawls, and my uncle weaves carpets, so I know quite a bit about the art of weaving. However, I’ve been more fascinated with the beauty and elegance of Kashmiri shawls.’ What is Worldstock? The handcrafted touch of artisan skill creates variations in color, size and design. If buying two of the same item, slight differences should be expected. Note: Color discrepancies may occur between this product and your computer screen. Imported Please allow 10 business days for the product to leave our warehouse and to receive tracking information. You should expect to receive this item within 15 business days.

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Voltage Valet Grounded Electrical Adaptor for use in South Africa and parts of India

Voltage Valet Grounded Electrical Adaptor for use in South Africa and parts of India


PackingLight.com’s job is to outfit the traveler with all of the travel essentials one needs to venture anywhere. Our selection of Voltage Valet Grounded Adaptors allow you to connect your grounded three pin appliance into the outlets of the world.The Voltage Valet GUE plug modifies grounded appliances to fit the electrical outlets found in the South Africa and within some establishments in India (15 amp sockets). The question you may have is: do I need a grounded adaptor? The answer is if your North American appliance has two flat blades and one round pin, your appliance is grounded and you need one of our grounded adaptors. In addition, you need to check your appliances to see if they are dual voltage and capable of working on 240 voltage overseas.We urge visitors to link to our Foreign Electrical page to get more in-depth information on when you need adaptors and converters for travel. Most often we find our customers do not need converters/transformers to bring down the 240 voltage found in foreign countries. The reason is they possess appliances that are already dual voltage with the capability to use anywhere without using converters. That is correct, people with most battery chargers and small travel appliances can check their appliance and discover their appliance has a rating specification that reads “100/240V”–indicating that the appliance is dual voltage and can work on the high 240 voltage abroad. So please check your chargers for MP3 players, digital cameras, razors, camcorders, cell phones, etc. and look for yourself. In addition, check your compact, folding hair dryers, travel curling irons and straighteners, travel steamers, irons, and coffee makers. If they’re built specifically for travel and/or purchased from PackingLight.com, we can save you the cost of buying a converter when you probably don’t need it!NOTE: Some countries use more than one type of outlet and you should carry the appropriate adaptor for each outlet listed. Again, adaptor plugs DO NOT convert electricity – they simply modify foreign outlets.To determine the adaptor plug you need see our link to Voltage Valet’s country list in the Electricity Guide section. http://www.voltagevalet.com/elec_guide.htmlIf you have any further questions call us on our toll free number: 1-800-349-0525. We welcome the chance to assist you.
List Price: $ 9.00
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The 2007-2012 Outlook for Golf Equipment and Apparel in India

The 2007-2012 Outlook for Golf Equipment and Apparel in India


New

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India May Have Just Published Its First ‘Gay Groom Wanted’ Ad

An newspaper in India — where gay sex was made a criminal offense in 2013 — just ran what may be the country’s first man-seeking-man matrimonial ad.

The ad, which ran this week in MiD DAY, an English-language newspaper in India, seeks a husband for Mumbai-based equal rights activist Harish Iyer. Iyer’s mother submitted the ad and was rejected by three other publications before MiD DAY accepted it.

In a Facebook post, Iyer thanked MiD DAY and its editor, Sachin Kalbag, and shared an image of the ad originally posted by Gaysi Family, an India-based gay rights group.

thanks Mid-day, thanks Sachin Kalbag

Posted by Harrish Iyer on Tuesday, May 19, 2015

The ad, which reads, “Seeking 25-40, Well-placed, Animal-Loving, Vegetarian GROOM for my SON (36, 5’11”) who works with an NGO, Caste No Bar (Though IYER Preferred),” was rejected by The Times of India, The Hindustan Times and the website dna, Iyer told BuzzFeed.

None of those publications responded immediately to HuffPost’s request for comment.

The ad has sparked some criticism for its closing parenthetical, “Though IYER Preferred.” Iyers are an upper-class rank of India’s caste system with which Iyer shares a name. He defended that portion of the ad to HuffPost India, saying it was a way for his family to try and match him with someone of a similar upbringing.

“My Mom would be happy if it was a Dalit Muslim yet vegetarian and animal loving guy,” Iyer said. “But she would love it if he happens to come from a familiar territory that she knows about. So, not really caste discrimination. It’s like you (author) saying that I would love people from any caste as an alliance, but I would love to enjoy machher jhol (fish curry, a Bengali staple) with him if he was Bengali.”

Although The Times of India refused to print the ad, it interviewed Iyer about his decision to create one.

“My mom worries about me too much,” he told the paper. “She is constantly thinking that I am getting old, will be alone, and all those concerns a mother has. So, she and I had a discussion last week and decided to go ahead with placing a matrimonial ad looking for a gay person.”

“My mum called me this morning saying three people have responded so far,” Iyer continued. “She asked me what to do next, how to proceed, so I told her, ‘proceed like you would have if you were looking for a girl for me.'”

In a statement to BuzzFeed, Kalbag said running the ad was a no-brainer.

“A marriage is a meeting of minds, of souls,” he wrote. “At mid-day, we believe that human rights should be applicable to all, regardless of religion, caste, colour, sexual orientation, etc. Therefore, a mother seeking a union for her gay son is perfectly normal. Why should it be any different? In fact, why should we even be talking about it? In an equal society, which we all strive for, this should be routine.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Weddings – The Huffington Post
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Georgette Maroon with Antique Beadwork Kurti/ Tunic (India)

Georgette Maroon with Antique Beadwork Kurti/ Tunic (India)


Add a touch of exotic style to your wardrobe with a kurti from India. This lovely women’s tunic is hand crafted of maroon georgette with antique-style beadwork and has 3/4-length sleeves. Product Features: Measurement Guide Women’s Sizing Guide Story Behind the Art: The Kurtis are made by group of artisans hailing from the state of Bihar in India. To support their families back home they have settled in big cities like Mumbai where they make these beautiful Kurtis. The kurti fabric is woven into beautiful designs on power looms by artisans who have been following the trade for generations, toiling day and night to give the cloth its intrinsic beauty and cool nature. Besides weaving, a fair number of kurtis have further attractive designs embellished on them by skilled artists. Color block printing by hand, hand-painting by talented painters and sewing on bejeweled embellishments by craftsmen to produce unique designs are just some of the efforts that go into making these extremely comfortable and fashionable kurtis. What is Worldstock? The handcrafted touch of artisan skill creates variations in color, size and design. If buying two of the same item, slight differences should be expected. Note: Color discrepancies may occur between this product and your computer screen. Imported

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i.Wander: The Definitive Guide to Travel Hacking (India Edition)

i.Wander: The Definitive Guide to Travel Hacking (India Edition)


[Note: This is an India edition book]You have a desire to travel around the world – a desire of most Indians (as per IMRB), second only to owning a home. But you find that travel, especially international trips is expensive. It is not. You can travel abroad at much less. sometimes even FREE! This is where Travel Hacking comes in. What is Travel Hacking?Travel Hacking is use of certain strategies, tactics and tools to bag travel deals. You can enjoy low cost (and sometimes free) foreign travel by techniques like exploiting airline frequent flyer miles and hotel loyalty points. Perhaps you knew that you can earn frequent flyer miles and loyalty points by flying more with your preferred airline or by enjoying stays at your choice of hotels. But, what if you could earn these miles and points without flying and staying! i.Wander: The Definitive Guide to Travel HackingThis PDF eBook has more than 110 pages of no-fluff, hands-on guidance on all aspects of travel hacking. Whether you are a family, a business traveller or a youngster, this eBook will let you in on the simple techniques which will enable you to travel in comfort at low cost or even free and with no stress.i.Wander: The Definitive Guide to Travel Hacking will provide you with insights on the following:-How can you earn airmiles & loyalty points using credit cards & without them?Which frequent flyer program should you join? Why?When should you buy an air ticket to minimize cost? Which airline? How?When should you travel? (It has nothing to do with auspicious times )-How can you travel in style – for less / no money? (Private jets, condos, lounge access, limousines etc)-Where and when should you book your accommodation?How can you save money on attractions and tours?…and much moreHow This Guide will Benefit YouSave Money. i.Wander will empower you to save money instantly, right from its first chapter. As you apply the formula on other aspects, you will gain more. How about a saving of at least Rs. 10,000

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A Travellers Guide to India

A Travellers Guide to India


This book covers several topics including: Chapter 1: Travel To India And Enjoy Life’s Pleasures Chapter 2: Is It Safe To Travel In India Now? Chapter 3: Theater Arts: Various Dance Forms Of India Chapter 4: The Current Trends: Deforestation In India And Its Overwhelming Progress Chapter 5: Travel To New Delhi – India’s Magnificent Capital Chapter 6: National Parks Of India Chapter 7: Online Airline Booking For Domestic Travel Inside India: The Easiest Way To Book Your Flights Chapter 8: Music And Dance Of India Chapter 9: Muslim Music In India Chapter 10: India Wildlife Tour And Hiking Adventure – An Experience You May Never Forget Chapter 11: Helpful Information On The Introduction Of Air Travel In India Chapter 12: The Start Of Air Travel Online Success In India Chapter 13: The Travel Circuits Of India That You Shouldnt Miss Chapter 14: India Travel Destination Tips Chapter 15: What To See In Agra, India Chapter 16: Visiting Ahmedabad India Chapter 17: Travel Recommendations For Northern India In Winter Chapter 18: The Easy Way To Travel In India Chapter 19: Travel To India And Visit Majestic Mumbai Chapter 20: Estimating Travel Costs To India Chapter 21: The Garden City Of India Chapter 22: The Great Importance Of Having India Travel Insurance Chapter 23: Applying For An India Travel Visa Chapter 24: Cheap Air Travel To India From Uk, Is It Possible? Chapter 25: Cultural Practices Of India Chapter 26: Chennai India Chapter 27: How To Get The Cheapest Travel To India Chapter 28: Beaches Of India Chapter 29: A Look At India’s Crafts Chapter 30: Looking For Air Travel Agents To India In Ny? Chapter 31: Adventure Travel In India: A Once In A Lifetime Experience Chapter 32: India Travel Guide – You Ticket To Explore The Country Chapter 33: Death Rituals Of India Chapter 34: India’s Culture Center Chapter 35: Picking A Good India Travel Agency Chapter 36: India Train Travel – Commendable And Dependable Chapter 37: Discount Business Class Travel To India Chapter 38:

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Wood hairpins, ‘Spirited Sunflowers’ (set of 3) (India)

Wood hairpins, ‘Spirited Sunflowers’ (set of 3) (India)


Festive sunflowers make a handsome trio in a set of hairpins from India’s Ritu. Each seesham wood hairpin is carved by hand and has a polished finish. One features a lighter kadam wood center.
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British in India 1825-1859: Organisation, Warfare, Dress and Weapons

British in India 1825-1859: Organisation, Warfare, Dress and Weapons


Of all the military campaigns fought by the British during the 19th century, no area saw more conflict than the subcontinent of India. Dozens of encounters, both great and small, involved many of its races as either friends or foes of Britain indeed, it was not unusual for an area to furnish both ally and enemy at the same time! This volume covers the British, Indian and Anglo-Indian troops who fought for The Honourable East India Company and Britain over the varied landscape of what is present day Afghanistan, India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, between the years 1826 and 1859. The vast array of uniforms and dress worn by soldiers serving in India during this period is examined in detail, and extensive information is also provided on regimental Colours. The books nine chapters cover the campaign in Bhurtpore (182526); the Coorg campaign (1834); the First Afghan War (183942); the conquest of Sind (1843); the campaign against Gwalior (1843); the Sikh Wars (184546 and 184849); actions on the North-West Frontier (184958); the Santhal Rebellion (185556); and the Indian Mutiny (185759). Each of these chapters includes uniform information specific to the campaign covered, while that on the Indian Mutiny also includes details of Mutineer dress. Many orders of battle and battle-plans are also included. Illustrations comprise 199 drawings of troop types and flags, and 27 other illustrations and maps.

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Recycled Tire and Tube Messenger Bag (India)

Recycled Tire and Tube Messenger Bag (India)


The Tire and Tube messenger bag makes the perfect accessory for the green-conscious lover of fashion. Made from recycled trash, this environmentally sound handbag will make a statement for all who see it. Product Features: Story Behind the Art: Born of a desire to reduce India’s mountain of waste, improve energy efficiency and help some of Delhi’s poorest out of the city’s slums, Conserve India achieves all this by turning plastic bags into high fashion. Today Conserve India employs and trains hundreds of people from Delhi’s most disadvantaged communities to clear their streets of the plague of plastic bag waste. Once the waste bags are turned into HRP products they are sold for profits which can be spent in those same communities on education and welfare programmes. By buying a Conserve bag, belt, wallet, shoe or necklace you not only get to be a trend setter with a beautiful funky piece of high fashion, but you will also be helping some of India’s poorest people and its environment. What is Worldstock? The handcrafted touch of artisan skill creates variations in color, size and design. If buying two of the same item, slight differences should be expected. Note: Color discrepancies may occur between this product and your computer screen. Imported Ships Carbon Neutral*

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White Silver – Handmade Sari Oblong Tablecloth (India) – 60 x 144

White Silver – Handmade Sari Oblong Tablecloth (India) – 60 x 144


Dress your table in the old-world opulence of Indian Selection’s hand made Sari table linen. These table cloths feature a pattern inspired by the royal designs of Indian culture. Set an exotic table with these linens, inspired by the colorful saris of India. On the tablecloth, the borders are finely worked with golden thread. The tablecloths are lined at the back with matching color fabric. Look for our matching curtains and other home furnishing items. Story Behind the Art: These sari fabric for these table cloths is made by artisans in Banaras. One of the oldest cities in history, Banaras is steeped deeply in myth and has a rich textile heritage. The weaver community uses power-looms to make sari’s and only 3 sari’s are produced per day per power loom. The entire family is usually involved in the sari making process. The weavers, who often spend their lives bringing alive delicate designs, measure their existence in meters of silk, inch by inch-the sari and all it symbolizes is the fabric of their life. These traditions of using the women in the family-who are always only involved in the first aspect of the sari making-still continues.

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Dark Gray – Handmade Sari Oblong Tablecloth (India) – 52 X 70

Dark Gray – Handmade Sari Oblong Tablecloth (India) – 52 X 70


Dress your table in the old-world opulence of Indian Selection’s hand made Sari table linen. These table cloths feature a pattern inspired by the royal designs of Indian culture. Set an exotic table with these linens, inspired by the colorful saris of India. On the tablecloth, the borders are finely worked with golden thread. The tablecloths are lined at the back with matching color fabric. Look for our matching curtains and other home furnishing items. Story Behind the Art: These sari fabric for these table cloths is made by artisans in Banaras. One of the oldest cities in history, Banaras is steeped deeply in myth and has a rich textile heritage. The weaver community uses power-looms to make sari’s and only 3 sari’s are produced per day per power loom. The entire family is usually involved in the sari making process. The weavers, who often spend their lives bringing alive delicate designs, measure their existence in meters of silk, inch by inch-the sari and all it symbolizes is the fabric of their life. These traditions of using the women in the family-who are always only involved in the first aspect of the sari making-still continues.

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The 2007-2012 Outlook for Women\’S Clothing Stores in India

The 2007-2012 Outlook for Women\’S Clothing Stores in India


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From France to India, Charlie Hebdo Reminds Us of the Real Promise of Free Speech

It took less than a day after the massacre of staffers, policemen, a visitor and a security guard at the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris for the discussion in India to swing back towards the need for “responsibility.”

Kiran Bedi, former senior police officer, now a prominent politician, tweeted just hours after the attack by masked gunmen that killed Charb, the editor at Charlie Hebdo, and many of his staff: “France Terror-Shoot-Out sends a message: why deliberately provoke or poke? Be respectful and civil. Don’t hurt people’s sensitivities!”

Even by the thick-skinned standards of contemporary Indian discourse, Bedi’s tweet was remarkably insensitive. But it was also undeniably representative of the way the Indian discussion on freedoms of expression has developed — or been choked off, depending on your perspective. That question, “why provoke?”, needs to be more closely examined, because it has strangled so much of Indian intellectual and cultural activity — and everyday life — for far too long.

In 2006, when the Danish cartoon controversy came to a head, many writers in India felt stampeded into one kind of response or another. To support the stance Charlie Hebdo took, republishing cartoons that carried images of the Prophet Muhammad that many Muslims found offensive, was to support the principle of free speech unhindered by the threats made by the religious.

But there was little space for those who wanted to say that they found the cartoons gratuitously offensive, did not endorse them personally, but felt that those who had drawn them and published them should not be persecuted or harmed in any case. I began following Charlie Hebdo’s work then, especially its provocative covers, which took on the Pope, Jesus, Jews, rabbis, French leaders, the Prophet Muhammad, the Boko Haram victims, Islam, Christianity, Judaism etc. I found its work childish and sometimes offensive, but I admired the magazine’s determination to offend all parties equally.

As I learned about the cases it had fought in the courts, my view of the Charlie Hebdo editorial team shifted: the cartoons might have been juvenile, but the team’s belief that free expression must accommodate all forms of satire, protest and parody was deeply serious, and embedded in a tradition of speaking rude, outrageous truth to power that went back centuries in France. Charlie Hebdo’s flaws, to me, were glaring and remainded worth analyzing: it had mocked Christianity and France’s politicians with a comfortable familiarity, but its mockery of Islam, African politics and even in one cartoon, India, were filled with stereotypes. As the writer Kamila Shamsie said on Twitter: “There are conversations to be had about the distinction between ‘offensive’ and ‘racist’. But the fanatics make it harder to have them.”

“I had thought of Charlie Hebdo with some envy. . . They had, I thought, been able to exercise a freedom that many Indians had not been able to claim.”

I respect the Charlie Hebdo team for one important thing: they really did believe that nothing was sacred, that everything human and every religion founded by humans was open to being satirized. They understood the danger of placing any institutions, political or religious, or any icons, gods, prophets, prime ministers, saints, leaders, beyond the reach of human mockery. If you say that the sacred should be respected, ask whether you really mean that gods, religions and their many interpreters “must” be respected. For between that well-intentioned “should respect” (a request) and that didactic “must” (a demand, often a threat) falls the shadow of tyranny, inquisitions, bullying mobs, fearful silence, blasphemy laws. And deadly execution-style massacres.



It might be hard to believe today, but in the eight years or so that preceded the day when gunmen went into its office, calling, “Where’s Charb? Where’s Charb?” before indiscriminately killing the editor and several staffers, I had thought of Charlie Hebdo with some envy. The staffers had gone to court and won their cases; two of France’s premiers had backed them on the right to continue being offensive in the same decade when we in India had lost the right to offend. They had been able to exercise a freedom that many Indians had not been able to claim.



Despite the threats made by Islamic groups against them, Charlie Hebdo had continued to publish, with the support of its community, its courts and even for the most part, its state. I thought it had found a way to work in relative safety, that it had escaped the always-present threats of violence that had silenced and diminished so many Indian artists, writers, filmmakers, liberals, journalists, rationalists, atheists, academics, scholars and publishers, muting some, turning some into exiles or pariahs, mutating many others into cowards. I thought that Charlie Hebdo’s staff had freedoms we could only imagine, but that was before the carnage in Paris.



pk aamir khan
(Poster of Aamir Khan in Bollywood film PK torn by activists of right wing organizations who accused Khan of hurting religious sentiments of the majority community and demanded a ban on the film)


The Trap of Decency

Why provoke when the price is so high, when the innocent could be and are caught in the crossfire? Why not just stick with art or opinions that are inoffensive? These questions have come up again and again in the Indian context, and elsewhere in the world. Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons raise a related question: do creators, artists, writers, opinion-makers need to be more responsible or more sensitive given the inflammable nature of the times, the legions of those looking for an excuse to perpetrate acts of violence?

In India, many are caught in one of two traps when they try to respond to the body of work produced by Charlie Hebdo.

The first is the trap of decency, even more powerful in a country where free expression is treated as a luxury good, to be bestowed as a treat when circumstances are favorable.

For far too many people, support for an artist or content creator is conflated with endorsement, and it is genuinely hard to understand why you might defend the right of someone to create work that you might dislike, be bored by, think in bad taste, or even consider offensive.

Decency demands — or used to, in a crowded and once-secular society — that we try not to offend others, that we adjust out of politeness. The idea that you might defend an essay by A.K. Ramanujan, a book by Salman Rushdie, a series of paintings by M.F. Husain, a film by Deepa Mehta or Aamir Khan, or an attempt by rationalist Sanal Edamaruku to debunk “miracles” on principle without necessarily agreeing with or liking their work is still an alien one. Free speech debates often veer into a discussion on content — why should x have chosen this subject, why should y have written in this particular way when they had other choices — and this tendency is particularly pronounced when people are personally uncomfortable with or offended by the content in question.

The second is the trap of fear, which leads to a belief in the value of appeasement.

The fear is usually the fear of violence that might be unleashed in an irrational, unpredictable manner by either committed groups of religious fundamentalists, as in Paris, or by political goons, as has been increasingly common in today’s India. It is this fear that makes many blame the victims of violent attacks, from the team at Charlie Hebdo and the two police officers murdered alongside, to artists and writers like Rushdie or the late Husain, for the violence visited upon them. Some blame the victims openly, suggesting that they had it coming and that they should have known better than to choose incendiary subjects.

Some use more subtle methods, suggesting that artists, too, have a responsibility to act with sensitivity, to rein their worst impulses in, to refrain from offending. Often, the real fear is that the artist or writer or journalist will bring threats, or escalating discomfort, or terrifying violence, rolling in the direction of others, will threaten the uneasy balance that still allows for a semblance of normalcy in India. Without this fine balance, the country might have to discard what is left — the holding of exhibitions and literary festivals, the publishing of books and magazines, the year-round university seminars and lectures.

In this scenario, publishers who pull back books, as Penguin India did so disgracefully with Wendy Doniger’s “The Hindus,” or agree to subject their books to a further process of review, as Orient Blackswan and Aleph have controversially done, are condemned only by a small section of liberals for caving in. Many others, including many writers, journalists and opinion-makers, see the compromises made as a pragmatic reaction to the pressures of the times. Many have argued that freedom of speech must be limited in India, that the creative and academic community must be prepared to sacrifice some rights for the sake of preserving the peace.

The problem with following a policy of appeasement is not just that this is ideologically dangerous, as the respected Indian historian and professor Romila Thapar pointed out in a blunt speech in late 2014:

“It is not that we are bereft of people who think autonomously and can ask relevant questions. But frequently where there should be voices, there is silence. Are we all being co-opted too easily by the comforts of conforming? Are we fearful of the retribution that questioning may and often does bring?”

Why was there so little reaction among academics and professionals, Prof. Thapar wanted to know, to the banning and pulping of books, the changing of educational syllabuses, the questioning of the actions of several organizations that act in the name of religion, if not in conformity with religious values?

Appeasement becomes a habit, and then so does silence, and the avoidance of difficult questions. The anger that could not be safely expressed by many for fear of reprisal, against, say, either Rushdie’s Islamic fundamentalist persecutors, or M.F. Husain’s Hindu right wing detractors, turns in another direction. In India, that anger is often directed at the victims — why did they have to provoke, did they not know what response they would get, and crucially, do they not see the trouble they might get everyone else into?

“It is easier to believe that a massacre was the victim’s fault, than to accept that one’s own comfort and safety depend almost entirely on not attracting the attention of fundamentalists, terrorists, thugs or the private armies controlled by corrupt and violent politicians.”

That anger, born of fear and powerlessness, is justified in many ways — personal attacks against the character of the victims, an airing of one’s own discomfort with the content under discussion. Often in FoE crises, victims are blamed, as in domestic violence or sexual assault cases, for the violence visited on them, in eerily similar rhetorical terms. It is easier to believe that a massacre was the victim’s fault, than to accept that one’s own comfort and safety depend almost entirely on not attracting the attention of fundamentalists, terrorists, thugs or the private armies controlled by corrupt and violent politicians.



This is how the artist M.F. Husain was exiled, the author U.R. Ananthamurthy hounded before his death last year, and Rushdie made to feel increasingly unwelcome in his own country. Dislike is useful; it allows people to step away from both their fear and their dismay at being unable to protect the books, art, conversations, and free spaces that they were once able to claim. And yet none of these gestures of appeasement have been effective in stemming the rise of hate speech across religious or political groups in India — in fact, the relative suppression of more moderate voices has in effect handed over the loudspeakers and the mikes to the bullies and the bigots.



salman rushdie
(Indian born British writer Salman Rushdie)


The Price of Not Offending

It is only when you stop sifting through the content, looking for possible flaws of taste or insensitivity, and stop interrogating the creative community over the purity of their intentions that you can move to more useful ground: the question of principle.

The right to offend was only one part of the principles that the team at Charlie Hebdo lived (and died) by; the other part was the principle that has most sharply divided humanity in this century, ie, the idea that all of us have an absolute right to question religion. This is where the argument that Charlie Hebdo could have somehow avoided the terror attacks by being a little less offensive or a little more sensitive falls apart.

In August 2014, Bangladeshi TV host Nurul Islam Faruqi, was visited by five men at his home in Dhaka; they tied up his family and slit his throat. Faruqi used to host religious programs, and was an imam himself. His crime was not that he used offensive or insensitive speech — he was murdered for speaking out against superstition and for his criticism of Islamic fundamentalism.

A year before Faruqi’s murder, the rationalist Narendra Dabholkar had been killed in August 2013 in India, by two unidentified gunmen. Dabholkar was not someone whose speech was either incendiary or deliberately offensive. But his work on bringing in anti-superstition laws had been strongly opposed by some members of the BJP and the far-right regional party, the Shiv Sena, which claimed that an anti-superstition/ black magic law would adversely affect Hindu culture.

Nor was Sanal Edamaruku, president of the Indian Rationalist Association, being disrespectful or offensive when he did his many exposes of “holy men” and their fake miracles. And yet in 2012, when he exposed the phenomenon of holy water apparently dripping from the toe of a statue of Christ as a consequence of bad plumbing, he faced a barrage of hate speech cases and escalating threats. Edamaruku now lives in Finland, not by choice, but out of necessity — it is not safe for him to come back home.

Responsibility cuts both ways. It is true that you cannot reason with a fundamentalist, of any religion, that there is no rational argument to be had with armed men bent on murder. But civil society and religious organizations have their responsibilities, too, and one of them is to enable and support those who want the freedom to question, to create, to debunk, and yes, even to mock. It must be kept in mind that what the team at Charlie Hebdo died for was not just the right to offend, but also the right to challenge and question everything — including religion, including Islam.

The promise of free speech goes far beyond the schoolboy thrill of being able to offend; the real promise of free speech is that we all hope to live uncensored lives, free to create in peace, and free to ask questions of or satirize the leaders, and the institutions, that run our everyday lives.

Why provoke, why defend those who are deliberately provocative? Because the bullies and the men with guns are at one extreme, and the Charlie Hebdos of this world — offensive, irreverent, deliberately pushing the boundaries of satire — are at the other. It is not necessary to follow in Charlie Hebdo’s footsteps in order to respect, or mourn the team. But if we want to live lives that are not muffled, censored and fearful, we must learn to give those who do provoke our support. If we don’t, the trammelled freedoms we have left will shrink even further.
Arts – The Huffington Post
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NEW URDU WRITINGS: FROM INDIA & PAKISTAN

NEW URDU WRITINGS: FROM INDIA & PAKISTAN


This could easily be for audiences who read in both languages: Hindi & English. Further with Sufism coming up on the charts in music and films, this anthology could well become a favorite with those who are passionate about the sensibilities in the subcontinent: India, Pakistan and even Bangladesh. The sense of a great literary tradition and emotions which are similar. As the editor of this collection, Rakhshanda Jalil makes it amply clear in the Introduction – “It will make very little difference if you read this book from back to front or the other, more conventional way, around”-and puts the 30 stories from India and Pakistan in the context of a shared language involving similar emotions. If in the “Mourner of the Feet”, an itinerant shoe witnesses an adulterous wife with merciless hips conducting her marital life, in “Revulsion” a young boy chances upon the sexual escapades of an ageing maid with young servant boys, almost mirroring the desperation of the household; in Joginder Pauls story, the futility of war between countries throws up a tragic-comic situation involving the picture of a girl child, even as a father awaiting his sons arrival on an airplane fervently prays for his co-travellers in Mansha Yads story; Laila in Jeelani Banos “Empty Bottles” is urban affluent and decidedly rejects her poetic lover for the comforts in her parents home and Sonu in Tarannum Riyazs “City” struggles to care for his infant sister and a dead mother in their fortified and spacious flat; Farzana blames her burqa for her transgression involving the murder of her children while Noor Bano is forcibly married to the Holy Quran and defiantly

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The 2007-2012 Outlook for Children\’S and Infants\’ Clothing Stores in India

The 2007-2012 Outlook for Children\’S and Infants\’ Clothing Stores in India


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Services Sector in India

Services Sector in India


Since the early 1990s, the growth process in India has been marked by a remarkable performance of services sector. While software exports are a well-known success story, India is now an important venue for many tasks in services such as financial accounting, call centres, processing insurance claims, and medical transcription. This book explains recent policy measures by the Government of India to make India’s services sector internationally competitive. The book focuses on the following services: financial services, IT and IT-enabled services, retail trading services, healthcare services, insurance services, educational services, transport and communication services, and tourism. It also includes a chapter on taxation of services in India.

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Electronics Waste Management: An India Perspective

Electronics Waste Management: An India Perspective


New – Electronic products play an important role in our society. Electronic products become an integral component of maintaining the quality of life. However, once the electronic products become obsolete, consumers force to discard the products as electronics waste. The disposing of electronics products have various consequences including loss of recyclable materials, recycling cost, appropriate recycling technology for precious metals etc. Issues such as environmental implications in recovering

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The 2007-2012 Outlook for Cosmetics, Beauty Supplies, and Perfume Stores in India

The 2007-2012 Outlook for Cosmetics, Beauty Supplies, and Perfume Stores in India


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