The Mills Remembers Hong Kong’s Textile Past and Promotes Its Future

HONG KONG — Like a lot of children who grow up in magnate families, Vanessa Cheung wasn’t so sure she wanted to work for the family business.
Cheung’s grandfather, Chen Din Hwa, founded Nan Fung Group as a textiles business in 1954. It was the days before Mainland China had opened up as an option for global manufacturing and Chen’s business grew quickly, earning him a place in the billionaires’ club and the nickname the “king of cotton yarn.” At its textiles operations height, Nan Fung employed more than 3,000 people to operate in their mills, producing up to 32.5 million pounds of yarn a year.
But the industry migrated across the border into China proper in the Eighties — lured by cheap labor and other costs at a fraction of the price — and Nan Fung shifted gears, focusing instead on developing a property empire across East Asia. The textiles operations faded away and by the time Cheung, who had embarked on a career as a landscape architect, was convinced to join Nan Fung, three of the former six mills the company owned had been turned into residential units, and the other three simply were used as warehouse space.
It was those three

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Whispers and Moans: Interviews with the Men and Women of Hong Kong’s Sex Industry

Whispers and Moans: Interviews with the Men and Women of Hong Kong’s Sex Industry


Hong Kong has a bewildering range of sex businesses offering services to suit all imaginable tastes: from the glitzy nightclubs of Tsim Sha Tsui East, through the saunas, karaoke lounges and one-woman brothels of Mong Kok, to the streets and short-time hotels of Sham Shui Po. Chinese-language sex magazines print reviews of individual prostitutes, and promote an ever-widening array of bizarre sexual practices. Even mainstream newspapers engage pimps as columnists. Business appears to be booming – but there are hungry newcomers to this underground economy. How do local prostitutes deal with the ruthless competition posed by an endless supply of girls from mainland China? To find out, Yeeshan Yang spent a year gaining the trust of the city’s sex workers, interviewing nearly 50 hookers, hostesses, toy boys, transsexual prostitutes, mama-sans and brothel owners. The result is an eye-opening book which shows the human side of sex for sale. Whispers and Moans contains tales of easy money, financial ruin and desperate love – and rare first-hand insights into Hong Kong’s huge but hidden sex industry.

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Screen Distribution and the New King Kongs of the Online World

Screen Distribution and the New King Kongs of the Online World


Like music and the news media before it, the film and television business is now facing its time of digital disruption. Major changes are being brought about in global online distribution of film and television by new players, such as Google/YouTube, Apple, Amazon, Yahoo, Facebook, Netflix and Hulu, some of whom massively outrank in size and growth the companies that run film and television today. Content, Hollywood has always asserted, is King. But the power and profitability in screen industries have always resided in distribution. Incumbents in the screen industries tried to control the emerging dynamics of online distribution, but failed. The new, born digital, globally focused, players are developing TV network-like strategies, including commissioning content that has widened the net of what counts as television. Content may be King, but these new players may become the King Kongs of the online world.

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