Leadership and Life Lessons from Amazon’s Jeff Bezos

Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos tries never to schedule a meeting before 10 a.m. and likes to make a small number of high-quality decisions daily.
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Leadership and Life Lessons from Amazon’s Jeff Bezos

Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos tries never to schedule a meeting before 10 a.m. and likes to make a small number of high-quality decisions daily.
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Top Female Music Executives Send Rebuke to Grammys Leadership

A letter to the Recording Academy’s board of trustees signed by six of the industry’s most powerful women calls the organization “woefully out of touch.”
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Samsung Electronics Shakes Up Leadership Lineup

Samsung Electronics shook up its senior ranks in a move that would replace all of its co-chief executives and strip its board chairman of any executive role for the first time as it looks to address concerns about a leadership vacuum at the top.
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Apple Shifts Leadership of Siri Amid Rising Competition

Apple has shifted oversight of its Siri voice-assistant team to Craig Federighi, putting the product in the hands of the technology giant’s top software engineer as it contends with rising competition from rivals such as Alphabet and Amazon.com.
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Uber’s Leadership Crisis Intensifies

Uber Technologies, under fire over its workplace culture, said a top lieutenant of its chief executive had left the firm, and it planned to name a Nestlé executive to its board, its third prominent female hire in the past week.
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New Exxon Leadership Would Face Tough Set of Challenges

President-elect Donald Trump’s pick of Rex Tillerson as secretary of state complicates challenges facing Exxon Mobil Corp., which must manage a transition to a new CEO but also the scrutiny Mr. Tillerson’s new public role could bring.
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Dayton Leadership Academies Receive Tribute & Medicine Help By Charles Myrick of ACRX

ACRX Recognition Gallery: American Consultants Rx

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7 Things I Want My Son to Know About Leadership

Standing in a crowded gym I watched as my teenage son and several of his friends took to the basketball court. He’s been playing sports since he was four years old and in many ways is a natural athlete when it’s channeled and honed by the great coaches he’s had. In prior seasons it’s taken him a good five minutes or so of play to warm up and adjust to being watched by a crowd of people. This year though, as one of only two eighth-graders on the varsity team, there’s no time for warming up. From tip off to the final buzzer he’s pretty much in, unless he gets fouled out. He’s pretty aggressive. I don’t mind that because I think it will serve him well someday. But this year I’ve witnessed a change.

The shy kid who was reluctant to take a shot is not only hitting occasional three pointers but his shoulders have changed. He stands solid, he’s encouraging his teammates, and he’s taking more control. It’s a metamorphosis on the hardwood. I’m witnessing the former shy kid show confidence and leadership. I’m amazed and proud. As he moves beyond middle school, I’m sure I’ll be in awe of plenty of other changes. Meanwhile, I hope I can look back and see that I’ve taught him these seven things, I believe every leader should know.

Leaders are proud of their roots. Never, ever be ashamed of your family, your faith, your friends, or your job. Where you come from is ok, and where others come from is okay. In fact it’s better than okay. The road to the person we become is paved by all those things. Besides, I once heard “my home may be someone else’s dream home, my car someone else’s dream car, my job someone else’s dream job.” Be proud, just don’t be prideful. The most shameful thing you can do is treat others less than yourself. Rather than chasing acceptance or approval from others, pursue your purpose and help show others theirs.

Leaders Communicate. Be confident and comfortable looking others in the eye. Soak up information and know your stuff. Knowing how to share your knowledge effectively is a skill. Be humble and bear in mind that no one likes a know-it-all. Know when to step up to the plate. Know when to step back. Don’t be a fake flatterer or tell people things just to tickle their egos. The most valued people are those who can keep confidence and who also speak truth out of genuine concern. Become to the go-to person who will shoot straight with people. You don’t always have to speak first. Sometimes it’s best to be last. Be kind, fair, and judicious in all you say, and above all remember this: Sometimes the most powerful or effective thing you can say is nothing at all.

Leaders Show Respect. You might feel that others need to earn your respect, but a leader shows respect in everything, every day. Respect property. Respect laws. Respect tradition but also respect dreams, innovation, and new ideas. Respect our leaders. Respect our country. Respect the process, and those who fight to preserve our freedoms. Respect the one you love in public and in private, and finally, for the sake of your integrity have a strong sense of self-respect.

Leaders Show Strength. Many people have ideas about what it means to be strong. Real strength is shown in how you react to life’s circumstances, surprises, and failures. Our strength is proven through our determination. Be relentless in pursuing your dreams, but remember “a dream is just a wish without a plan.” Strong people make plans, and strong people can accept when plans need to change. The key is just to have a plan. Have the guts to stand up for what’s right. For example, silence when someone is bullied or mistreated is a sign of weakness and being a bully just makes you a jerk or worse. Be resilient, be driven and own up to your mistakes. That is strength.

A Leader is Someone You can Count On. Unless there’s an emergency (a real one), if you say you’ll do something, do it. Be where you said you’ll be, do what you said you’d do, and in the rare event you can’t meet your obligation ask forgiveness, and make it right.

Leaders Are Human and It’s Okay to Show it. Part of the problem in our broken world is that too many people are afraid to express love or emotions because of poor examples or negative life experiences. Don’t shy away from emotion. Don’t ever let anyone tell you it’s not ok to “feel” something. Show affection when it’s appropriate. And hey, it’s okay to shed a tear over things that matter, just don’t be a crybaby or whiner when things don’t go your way. There’s a difference. One way to show your humanity is by serving others. Remember that it’s difficult to feed hate when we’re feeding others together and it’s hard to tear people down when we’re building something together. Show you care, and if you really care, you’ll act on it.

Leaders Solve Problems. Be a problem solver. There’s a big difference between “problems” and “situations.” No matter how big or small the problem is, if you don’t like something or you see an injustice, then commence to changing it. There’s almost always more than one way to solve a problem. Remember not every problem can be solved overnight, but you have to start somewhere.

This post was originally published on The Good Men Project.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

“I Have a Dream”: A 50th Year Testament to the March That Changed America, A Southern Christian Leadership Conference Commemorative Photo Journal

“I Have a Dream”: A 50th Year Testament to the March That Changed America, A Southern Christian Leadership Conference Commemorative Photo Journal


On August 28, 1963, something quite amazing occurred. On the day, one of the largest political rallies ever took place in support of civil and economic rights of African-Americans and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave one of the most stirring speeches in history, when standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, he delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.This book is a celebration of the 50th anniversary of this address and includes narrative and more than 100 captioned photos of the American Civil Rights movement. The photographs come from Bob Adelman, one of the most notable photographers of this movement. His work has been featured in Time, Newsweek, and the Associated Press. It is authored by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), an organization in which Dr. King served as the first president.
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“I Have a Dream”: A 50th Year Testament to the March That Changed America, A Southern Christian Leadership Conference Commemorative Photo Journal

“I Have a Dream”: A 50th Year Testament to the March That Changed America, A Southern Christian Leadership Conference Commemorative Photo Journal


On August 28, 1963, something quite amazing occurred. On the day, one of the largest political rallies ever took place in support of civil and economic rights of African-Americans and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave one of the most stirring speeches in history, when standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, he delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.This book is a celebration of the 50th anniversary of this address and includes narrative and more than 100 captioned photos of the American Civil Rights movement. The photographs come from Bob Adelman, one of the most notable photographers of this movement. His work has been featured in Time, Newsweek, and the Associated Press. It is authored by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), an organization in which Dr. King served as the first president.
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Leadership in Psychiatry

Leadership in Psychiatry


The psychiatric profession must ensure that its next generation of leaders has the appropriate skills to provide mental health services in the face of globalization and urbanization, new technologies, and competing demands for shrinking resources. Developing leadership skills and leaders is critical in order to optimise the use of resources, their application, service planning and delivery of services for patients and their families. This is the first book on leadership (rather than management skills) to focus on psychiatry and mental health care. Contributions from international experts with clinical and non- clinical backgrounds pull together the theories and practical skills required to be a successful leader. The aim is to guide mental health professionals in general and psychiatrists in particular on how to gain the relevant skills and on how to utilise these skills and training to take on leadership roles in clinical and organisational settings. The book covers the role of the leader and the skills required for leadership, including chapters on communication, decision-making, team development, mentoring, gender issues in leadership, burnout and more. It includes a section on assessment tools and learning material. Essential reading for all those who aspire to lead in psychiatry

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Leadership, Emotional Intelligence and Positive Reinforcement

This past month I’ve written a series of columns on leadership, discussing some issues in a very broad sense, and highlighting a number of individuals as well. Leadership, of course, can be defined in a myriad of ways, and for the individual observer it usually comes down to “I know it when I see it.” My favorite definition, which I learned from Professor Marty Linsky at Harvard’s Kennedy School, is “Leadership is disappointing your friends at a pace they can absorb.” We’ve certainly seen that with President Obama’s years in office, but it’s fair to say that it holds just as well for most spheres of human interaction, including parenting children.

Professor Daniel Goleman, author of the immensely popular and influential revision of IQ called Emotional Intelligence, published in 1995, has just written a new book called Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence. Partly warning us about over-reliance on all the distracting technologies out there that have created an advanced, multitasking Homo sapiens, the book’s more lasting influence will be encouraging people to take the time, unplugged from the world, to nurture those quiet moments of focus that lead to creativity. He discusses both emotional and cognitive empathy, declaring that empathy can only be exercised through attention and self-awareness. He quotes Herbert Simon, the economist, who said that “a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention.”

Paying greater attention and developing self-awareness — what in Zen is called “mindfulness” — leads to greater happiness. The connection of awareness to creativity, including Goleman’s belief that positive reinforcement is far more persuasive and conducive to change than repeated diatribes that the sky is always falling, is my topic for this week.

I have a relatively unique take on this as a trans woman, one who was closeted for most of my life. Every moment of self-awareness — and there were many since early childhood — turned into fear-based paralysis. That paralysis caused a chronic depressive state, which drained me of the internal strength I needed to find my courage to break away. There were many reasons I finally found my courage, including time eroding my defenses, the trauma of 9/11, a decade of yoga practice with meditation, and the development of effective techniques of facial surgery that made a successful transition possible. Having embraced my self-awareness, I was able to leap across the chasm of darkness that separates the genders in Western society and emerge into a state of aletheia, or unconcealedness. I could simply be, as the woman I always was.

Part of my transition, which became public 11 years ago, simply entailed the freedom to be myself, the release from decades of wasted energy limited to trying to imagine an unattainable life as both a physical and social woman. After some effort I reached a comfort zone, which, in freeing me from needing to exert huge effort to control and protect, was a huge release and relief. Part of my transition was devoted to my family, particularly my adolescent children. Another part was my search for meaning as a member of society.

I choose to be an activist, channeling some of my early political interests into advocating for those who had less and to whom I owed so much. I found, as Goleman points out, that reaching outside myself, now possible because I wasn’t concealed, afforded me the opportunity to be creative in a way I had never before been. While I had developed some novel surgical techniques during my career, being detached from the emotions associated with those efforts left me vulnerable and empty. Now, living as myself, I found, in spite of the prejudice and bigotry around me, even in some of the places one would least expect it, that I was able to create positive change in creative ways. Most of what was required was simply showing up and being willing to take risks.

Goleman’s other major point is the greater effectiveness of positive reinforcement over fear tactics. We all know how effective the conservative political establishment is in generating resistance to progress based on inculcating fear among the ignorant, particularly with gay and trans issues. Unfortunately, we, the forces for progress, at times play the same game, sending out fundraising missives claiming the end is near. And while we don’t associate those calls with an actual Armageddon, I’ve watched too many progressive organizations resort to those tactics over the years. They don’t work most of the time, but even when they do, they have the effect of blunting emotional growth by creating a numbness that only perpetuates the stalemate and inhibits progress toward full equality.

Louis Pasteur famously said, “Chance favors only the prepared mind.” We need to find our courage as we continue to struggle with our personal challenges, and to offer hope that in the future, in spite of the deluge of smartphone banners and notifications, we can find the space and time to be mindful, pay attention, become more creative, prepare our minds for those moments of serendipity, and maybe even find some happiness.
GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News