Lorod Pre-Fall 2019

For pre-fall, Lorod’s Lauren Rodriguez mashed up the brand’s signature play on workwear and American craft details with a playful spirit à la sporty uniforms and new takes on fashionable utilitarian garb. Inspiration from “A League of Their Own” resulted in a lightweight washed silk baseball dress and bowling shoes, a part of their third collaboration with Manolo Blahnik, with stitching meant to resemble baseballs while sporty ephemera pictorials were scattered on tighter under layers in a “(Robert) Rauschenberg-inspired assemblage-collage.”
While it was unclear of cofounder Michael Freels’ involvement for the latest collection, creative director and cofounder Rodriguez mentioned she’s running the show solo, and impressively so. Workwear-inspired denim and suiting was offered for the first time in men’s sizing, although the brand has been long worn by both genders, as were crafty knits, another expanded category, that paid homage to American craft with whipstitching and patchwork.
From polka-dotted or apricot-colored suiting to fine-gauge knits with swirly folds that mimicked the coiled lining of air force uniform flight jackets, the lineup felt fresh while adhering to the strengths of the brand’s DNA.

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Lorod Pre-Fall 2018

Lorod’s Lauren Rodriguez and Michael Freels have made American workwear a key focus of their design aesthetic. They also produce in the Garment District and source materials like newly introduced leathers from established American companies. They update iconic silhouettes with a gender-ambiguous eye, zeroing in on elements of utility. Men enjoy their designs; many references are culled from traditional men’s wear tailoring, after all.
The pre-season-only model they’ve employed has worked in their favor, allowing their rather seasonless designs to sit on sales floors longer. For a young brand, presence is vital. So, too, is clear direction. They’re in a steady growth phase and are smart about organic developments, elevation and refinement.
Their latest collection drew from the American West, glossed with a Fifties rockabilly sensibility and referencing cowboys and prairie fashion. If it sounds old-fashioned, it wasn’t. In the duo’s hands, the result was clean, polished, modern design. There were Western yoke shirts paired with tonal skirts, leather and suede patchwork skirts and even a landscape image of New Mexico on jacquard knits.
The rest wasn’t so literal, centered around the power of minimalism. The beige trench was a crowd favorite and the leather jackets provided some dramatic angularity. Tonal wool suiting

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Lorod Pre-Fall 2017

Newcomers Michael Freels and Lauren Rodriguez have an aesthetic of modern-day vintage tinged with men’s and streetwear elements. Their Lorod label balances editorial appeal and elevated ease with a pulse on gender-fluid design — reworked denim, updated Americana and underpinnings-as-rtw all make ample appearances in their first full collection. They showed a capsule for spring to gauge market response, and ultrahip stores like Opening Ceremony, Shop Super Street and Curve opted into it.
The collection is an extension of personal style and tailoring traditional men’s wear items to fit a woman’s body (Rodriguez is guilty of buying vintage boy’s clothes for herself). Updated workwear like carpenter pants got a literal twist in the seams to wrap around the legs, and was made with more refined fabrics like water-resistant lightweight canvas. Sexy knit henleys, quilted pieces referencing military garments and shorts inspired by men’s boxers straddled a gender-ambiguous line. Effortlessly cool, the line appeals to girls looking for no-fuss, relaxed chic dressing.
“The vibe of our clothes, to us, seems fairly straightforward because it’s what we’re inclined to make and look at, but to a lot of people there’s not much out there that’s like this,” Rodriguez said during a preview. Denim offerings

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