Lindsay Kemp, performer and Bowie mentor, dies at 80

He mentored David Bowie and taught dance to Kate Bush, who calls him a “truly original and great artist”.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

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EXCLUSIVE: VFiles Announces Runway 10 Show, Mentor Committee for New York Fashion Week

It’s back to the runway for VFiles, which will be holding its 10th show on Sept. 5.
Last season, instead of the traditional runway/performance extravaganza the company hosts, it staged “Be Heart, Make Noise,” an immersive music and fashion event done in collaboration with Adidas Originals. In the past, runway shows included celebrity guest judges such as Khloé Kardashian and Young Thug. For VFiles Runway 10, the brand is bringing its event a bit more down to earth by, for the first time, appointing a committee of eight industry leaders that will select and mentor show contestants throughout their journey to New York Fashion Week. After that, the VFiles team will provide mentorship for the following season. The pivot brings a slightly more serious — yet welcome — tone to the show that has otherwise been high on experimental fashion.
The mentor committee includes: Julie Anne Quay, founder and chief executive officer of VFiles; Laura Brown, editor in chief of InStyle magazine; Rio Uribe, designer and founder of Gypsy Sport; Candy Pratts Price, fashion consultant; Anna Trevelyan, stylist and creative consultant; Erin Magee, founder of MadeMe; Paul Cupo, designer, and James Costas-Michael, merchandise director of VFiles.
Also new for the season;

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First Person: These Days I Miss John Updike, a Remote and Noble Male Mentor

After I rejected a married male supervisor, my dream job disappeared, but Updike, chronicler of adultery, remained a beacon of propriety and hope.
NYT > Fashion & Style

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Nine Women Accuse Israel Horovitz, Playwright and Mentor, of Sexual Misconduct

He was a charismatic father figure who nurtured young writers. But in incidents from the 1980s through 2016, the women describe a pattern of abuse and betrayal.
NYT > Arts

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Stellan Skarsgard won’t mentor his actor sons

Stellan Skarsgard has told Sky News he doesn’t give advice to his four sons who have followed in his footsteps in becoming actors.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

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Jessica Alba’s Names Her Mentor And You’ll Never Guess Who It Is

Jessica Alba might have earned her fame and fortune from starring in television shows and Hollywood films like Fantastic Four, but the actress-turned-entrepenuer is now all about her business The Honest Company. Founded in 2011, the billion dollar non-toxic goods empire provides customers with healthy, sustainable home cleaning, baby and beauty products.

As Alba continues to expand the fast-growing business and team up with big store chains like Target, one could only help to wonder where she found the ambition to step into the business industry. The 36-year-old actually took the leap into entrepreneurship with the inspiration of one person she calls her mentor: director James Cameron.

Because of Carmeron—who directed blockbusters like Titanic and Avatar—and his determination to film the wreck of the Titanic ship when there was no technology to do so, Alba felt that there was no reason she couldn’t do something out of her element. That’s when The Honest Company was born.

“The way James operated hit me hard. It opened my mind to the idea that it didn’t matter what had or hadn’t been done before, or how seemingly insurmountable the task,” she revealed. “If you really want something, you go after it. You create a new reality.”

She added, “James didn’t start off as an inventor or an engineer. But he found a way to fill the gaps where technology was lacking, resulting in groundbreaking advances in the film industry. I didn’t have a background in business. But I saw a need and felt compelled to act.”

Alba shared her game changing moment as part of a new career series on LinkedIn that features other celebrities like celebrities including Kumail NanjianiRachel Zoe and more.


PEOPLE.com

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Cosby Trial Live Briefing: Bill Cosby Was Sexual Predator, Not Mentor, Prosecutor Says at Trial

In opening statements, a prosecutor said Mr. Cosby betrayed Andrea Constand’s trust, while his defense cited 53 phone calls she made to him after the alleged incident.
NYT > Arts

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Derek Lam Tapped as Host, Chair, Mentor for Cerebral Palsy Foundation Gala

UNIVERSAL DESIGN: Design students were charged with weaving the theme of fashion and innovation into their pieces for the Cerebral Palsy Foundation’s Design for Disability Gala.
The event, scheduled for May 16, has Derek Lam serving as the evening’s official host and honorary chair.
Lam also served as mentor to students from the Fashion Institute of Technology, The New School’s Parsons School of Design and School of Visual Arts for a fashion show component to the evening.
Honorees at the gala include ABC Network’s “Speechless” for the Goldenson-Arbus Vanguard Media Award, Microsoft for the Global Empowerment Award and Nike for fashion innovation specifically for its FlyEase shoe.
“Derek’s involvement has been wonderful, both enlightening and inspiring,” said Cerebral Palsy Foundation chief executive officer Richard Ellenson. “As students have wrestled with complex functional issues, he has not only shown an appreciation for their insights as to making fashion accessible, he has been unerring in helping guide them toward the creation of cohesive and affecting collections. It’s been a treat for all of us to experience firsthand his thoughts on fabric selection, workmanship and the power of fashion.”
Lam became acquainted with the organization’s Design for Disability program through Domenico de Sole, chairman at Sotheby’s and Tom Ford and

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Woody Harrelson Eyed to Play Han Solo’s Mentor in ‘Star Wars’ Spinoff (EXCLUSIVE)

After playing a mentor to Katniss Everdeen in “The Hunger Games” franchise, Woody Harrelson might help guide another iconic character’s journey. Sources tell Variety that, while talks are still in the early stages, Harrelson is the top choice to play Han Solo’s mentor in the upcoming “Star Wars” spinoff starring Alden Ehrenreich. Donald Glover and Emilia… Read more »

Variety

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My Mentor Never Gave His Last Lecture

To millions of beloved readers, Jeff Zaslow was the advice columnist who replaced Ann Landers and the bestselling author who captured our hearts with moving books like The Last Lecture with Randy Pausch. But to me and countless other writers, Jeff was a devoted mentor who gave countless hours of his time and energy to help aspiring authors.

When I was in middle school, Jeff and his family moved in across the street from our house in Michigan. At a neighborhood barbecue, I was a shy, nerdy kid shooting baskets alone. Jeff walked over, introduced himself, and challenged me to a game of HORSE. He took a genuine interest in getting to know me, asking about my hobbies and crushes. Although we had just met, I had the uncanny sense that this new neighbor truly cared about me. Suspiciously, he lost that game of HORSE very, very badly.

Looking back, Jeff was the first adult who treated me like a peer, and it helped me come out of my shell. At the time, I had no idea that Jeff would become a mentor to me–or that I would enter the writing profession.

Two decades later, I decided to write my first book. In search of guidance on developing a proposal, I reached out to Jeff. Less than three hours later, his reply landed in my inbox. He invited me to call his cellphone any time, day or night. He asked me thoughtful questions and listened to my responses. I explained that I was interested in writing about why people help others. “You haven’t found the forest in the trees yet,” he confided, “but I think there’s potential for a book here.” He suggested trying to articulate my message in a single sentence. “What’s the big, surprising idea?”

Three days later, the answer hit me. The book was going to be about the surprising success of people like Jeff, who consistently helped others without expecting anything in return. Instead of achieving success and then giving back, is it possible that you could attain success by giving first? To paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, if you use your candle to light mine, I get light without darkening you.

Months later, when I was preparing to meet with publishers, my heart was racing. Jeff kindly reviewed my pitch and boosted my confidence with a quip: “The little schnitzel across the street is going to be famous!”

Two weeks later, Jeff launched his latest book, The Magic Room. Despite being scheduled around the clock, he sent me a note to check in on how the meetings with publishers went. Just like the first time I met him, I was overwhelmed by the fact that he cared. He helped me choose the right publisher and added, “Here’s hoping you’re the next Malcolm Gladwell.”

When I started writing, I relied on Jeff’s work as a model for creating narratives that speak to readers’ hearts along with opening their minds, and his personal example as a reminder of what it meant to put other people first. There was the time in 1983 when he gave the croissant out of his mouth to a homeless person. There was the Zazz Bash, an annual singles party that he created for charity–and led to 78 marriages. In his books, he was always shining a spotlight on others. And there was the time when he ran into my dad at a local store. Jeff had just released a new book and had a stack of them sitting at home in our neighborhood. But Jeff marched up to the register and paid for a copy of his own book, autographing it so my dad didn’t have to wait for a signed edition.

Despite the fact that he gave advice for a living, Jeff never assumed that he knew the right course of action for anyone else. This humility was visible early in his career. In his late twenties, while writing a story for the Wall Street Journal about the contest to replace Ann Landers, he decided to enter it on a lark. When an interviewer told him he was underqualified, he replied: “I may be 28, but I have the wisdom of a 29-year-old.”

When students ask me how they can pay their mentors back, I challenge them to think about it differently. Mentoring is a gift, and their job is to receive it with gratitude. How can they show their mentors that they’ve made a difference?

In 2012, before I finished writing my book, Jeff lost his life in a tragic car accident. I missed the opportunity to tell him what an impact he had on me–not only as a writer, but as a role model for how to live a good life.

Jeff Zaslow never got the chance to give his own last lecture. I don’t know what he would have said, but I know how he would have made you feel. He would have dazzled you with humor, enlightened you with insight, and inspired you to pursue and savor the most meaningful moments in life.

I dedicated my book to him, but it seems that the most powerful way to honor Jeff’s memory is to share the wisdom that he imparted through his actions. He taught me four timeless lessons about mentoring:

1. Great mentors don’t give answers. They ask questions.

2. Great mentors are proactive, not reactive. They don’t just respond to outreach; they reach out to their mentees.

3. Great mentors see more potential in their mentees than their mentees see in themselves.

4. Great mentors focus on their mentees’ success, not on their own.

Since we lost Jeff, people have come out of the woodwork to share how much his generosity meant to them. Perhaps the most stirring was Brad Epstein, a healthcare executive. Seven years ago I worked on a project with Brad, not realizing that he knew Jeff. It turns out they were roommates in Orlando in their twenties.

“I miss the light he added to the world,” Brad wrote. “But I can see the glow from countless candles he lit.”

Thank your mentor before it’s too late. And then light as many candles as you can.

***

Adam is a Wharton professor and the New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success. His free monthly newsletter on work and psychology is at www.giveandtake.com.

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GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
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Merry Christmas for Mentor & Family – Cute cats play music with bells Greeting Card

Merry Christmas for Mentor & Family – Cute cats play music with bells Greeting Card


7 x 5 Paper Greeting Card
List Price: $ 3.50
Price: $ 3.50