On Comedy: Ellen DeGeneres Is Not as Nice as You Think

Feeling boxed in by her reputation for kindness, the comic is weighing whether to leave daytime TV, as her wife wants, or to stay, as her brother urges.
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Vaginal mesh operations should be banned, says NICE

Implants can cut into the vagina – and some women have been left in permanent pain, unable to walk.
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The City So Nice They Can’t Stop Making Movies About It

Could you pick one film that embodies New York? Our critics (and the mayor’s office) would like you to try.
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Drug industry to challenge Nice over new cost limits

The drug industry is taking legal action over limits introduced on expensive new drugs.
BBC News – Health
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The OC reunion? ‘It would be nice to see everybody’

The OC star Rachel Bilson has reignited hopes for a show reunion by saying she is open to the idea.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

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What Is It Like to Be Nice to Everybody?

People with a disorder called Williams syndrome are irrepressibly friendly and driven to engage with others.
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Nice Speech, Mark Zuckerberg! You’re Still a Few Credits Short

Facebook’s CEO, who delivered a commencement address, joins a growing roster of degree-less entrepreneurs and entertainers doing the honors. ‘I am fake graduating.’
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The Wonderful World We’d Live In If The Whole Internet Were Nice For A Day

The internet can be a mean and treacherous landscape. There are trolls abound, feasting on the comment sections of innocent social media accounts, and news feeds seem to have only terrible things to tell us about the world. 

But what if the internet was instead a bastion of positivity? Comedy writer Mel Owens imagines a world where the internet is … just nice.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Comedy – The Huffington Post
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The Nice Guy’s Guide To Online Dating Profiles

The Nice Guy’s Guide To Online Dating Profiles


Tired of getting no replies to your online dating messages?Well let me ask you a question. How much effort have you really put into preparing your profile?As my mother always said, if you’re going to do something, you might as well do it right. If you are really looking for love, then I can help you create an irresistible profile targeted towards your perfect woman. I’ve pulled together the top advice from three very different fields to give you the ultimate edge. First, the hard facts on what’s hot and what’s not when it comes to communicating online, thanks to academic psychological studies into computer mediated communication. But don’t worry, I’ve done all the hard work, all you need to do is read the interesting parts. Second, if anyone knows about selling things online it’s the internet marketers. Using common internet strategies, I’ll take you through identifying your target market and the best ways to summarize yourself as a selling brand. Third, who better to help you get that all across than the world’s storytellers? By relying on the tools of the trade for writers you’ll know how to turn a flat laundry list of attributes into a flowing work of art that will have the girls begging to be part of your story. This book is not about copying someone else’s system so you end up with their perfect girl. It’s not even about getting your inbox to overflow with messages from girls you aren’t interested in. It’s all about finding out what you really want, and how you can best present yourself to that type of girl. Online dating profiles are as individual as you are, so don’t sell yourself short by trying to be someone else.I personally want you to present your best face to the world, because I am among the hundreds of great girls who want to meet you, the best you.

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Healthy women should take breast cancer pill, says NICE

Hundreds of thousands of healthy women should take pills to cut their risk of breast cancer, says NHS watchdog.
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The Nice Guys

The Nice Guys Opens Friday, May 20, 2016

Set in 1970s Los Angeles, down-on-his-luck private eye Holland March (Ryan Gosling) and hired enforcer Jackson Healy (Russell Crowe) must work together to solve the case of a missing girl and the seemingly unrelated death of a porn star.

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‘Downton Abbey’ Season 6, Episode 3 Recap: So Nice to See Him Again?

It’s all about new and old suitors for the daughters of Downton.



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Art Therapy Is More Than Just Making Nice Pictures

Anyone who has ever put pen to paper, crayon to coloring book, or hand to wet clay knows the healing powers embedded in such creative endeavors. More than just a pastime, art can be an escape, a stimulus, a war cry or a tranquil reprieve.

Art therapy, defined as “a form of psychotherapy that uses art media as its primary mode of communication,” revolves around this principal of art’s immense power. Open to children and adults of any background and experience, the still-evolving field explores modes of expression, understanding and healing that occur when paint touches canvas. While too many schools today run under the assumption that art is extraneous, a diversion from traditional academic subjects, art therapists know better. They know that art has the potential to change lives, and, even to save them.

Tally Tripp is the art therapy clinic director of George Washington University, specializing in individuals who have experienced trauma. Entering the field in its nascent phase, in the 1970s, Tripp was elemental in shaping the field as we know it today. 

Continuing The Huffington Post’s coverage of the often misunderstood field that is art therapy, and the pioneers who continue to sculpt it, we reached out to Tripp to discuss the details of her career’s past and present.  

How did you become interested in art therapy? How did you learn about the field? 

When I first learned about art therapy it was definitely a field in its infancy. Personally, I have always loved art making and combined that with an interest in working with people. In high school I spent summers in New York working for the Children’s Aid Society with disadvantaged children in a camp program. It was there, as a counselor in the arts and crafts program, I came across one of the original art therapy journals: the Bulletin of Art Therapy (edited by Elinor Ulman and produced between 1961-1970).

For many years, that journal was the only art therapy publication available. At the same time, in 1971, Elinor Ulman and her colleague, psychologist Bernard Levy started an art therapy program at the George Washington University. Pretty quickly my goal became to study art therapy in the master’s program at GW, which I did between 1978 and 1981. Now, full circle, I am a full time professor in the art therapy program at GW and the director of the GW Art Therapy Clinic.

How did art therapy look when you first immersed yourself in it? 

In the late 1970s, art therapy was still an emerging profession. It was definitely an exciting time for the field as we students were taught by some of the early pioneers: Elinor Ulman, Edith Kramer and Hanna Kwiatkowska — innovative thinkers developing clinical approaches that were based largely on intuition coupled with psychoanalytic thinking that was popular at the time. Also in those days there were few texts or research studies on art therapy to guide us, so we learned primarily by our experiences and our clinical work. As art therapy was a relatively unknown profession, we all put time and effort into spreading the word and educating others about its value.

The field is more established now, and more often than not, people have heard of art therapy and have some understanding of how it works. Art therapists now have licenses in some states as well as levels of professional credentialing and board certification. Beyond that, we have a lot of art therapy literature at our fingertips including research studies supporting the efficacy of art therapy and describing how it is utilized across many settings and populations. Art therapists can now be found in various settings — from medical and psychiatric hospitals, to schools, geriatric facilities, community and studio settings, and in private practice.

What are your areas of interest in the field? 

I have maintained a private practice in art therapy for over 30 years. My specialization is working with individuals who have experienced trauma. I find these clients are excellent candidates for art therapy precisely because the art can provide a means for expressing the inexpressible feelings that are often shut down or pushed away from consciousness in response to traumatic events. It has been exciting in the last 25 years to see that neuroscience research has validated the kind of work we do. Through brain imagery, we now know that the cognitive and executive functioning of the brain is for the most part “off line” when people are recalling their traumas, rendering them essentially “speechless.” This helps explain why traditional verbal therapy is often not enough when working with trauma, and why art (imagery) and other experiential therapies are so effective.

I reached out to you in part because of Suicide Awareness Month. In your private practice do you work with many patients grappling with suicidal thoughts? What are some of the methods you practice in such circumstances? 

Any therapist in private practice will have to deal with patients who are struggling with suicidal thoughts from time to time. Negative beliefs and hopelessness can render the individual helpless to combat the urge for self-harm. To work with suicidal thoughts, a clinician must first assess how developed the plan is, and, if the patient is truly in imminent danger of self-harm, hospitalization may be required. But hospitalization has its limits and is only one step.

Beyond the immediate safety needs, I work on resourcing my patients to help them develop other coping strategies so that they can better manage their feelings and find alternate responses. Some interventions might include creating a safety plan with a hierarchy of actions to take, or to come up with a list of resources that can be quickly accessed when the suicidal impulse arises, or helping with a variety of cognitive and behavioral restructuring techniques, or perhaps increasing the frequency of therapy sessions, etc. Sometimes I will recommend a soothing art activity for “homework” such as working in an art coloring book or journal, that can assist with a person feeling grounded and safe. Art can soothe anxiety and help with re-focusing attention to something more positive and less destructive than a suicidal plan.

Are most of the patients you encounter already involved in art? Are they ever skeptical?  

It is true that most people think of going to an art therapist because they enjoy making art and are already involved in it somehow. But that is not the only kind of person who will benefit from art therapy.

For example, one man I worked with was also being seen in marriage therapy and was referred to me because it was determined that he needed to access more emotional depth. This man had no apparent interest in art, but agreed to see me as an experiment because art therapy had been recommended. I invited him to work on a picture of simply lines and shapes and just “see what happens.” His first picture, a simple downward sloping line was created in a matter of seconds. But when we held the “picture” up and explored it from a distance, he became struck by the downward motion and then exclaimed: “This is exactly what I have been trying to describe. It looks like my mother’s lap. Empty. She was never able to really hold me!” The image and description of not being held as a child became a fundamental theme in our work together. And within a few months, this patient enrolled in a painting class and began a new appreciation for art.

Can you explain what you hope to achieve with a suicidal patient through art therapy? What changes are you looking to make?

Often the artwork will convey a suicidal feeling of hopelessness or despair long before words are consciously available. The image can provide a means for discussing feelings that are either unclear or difficult to verbalize. Art works tend to be self-referential so we work actively with the images and themes that are produced.

For example, an image of a desolate landscape might signal an empty feeling and suicidal state in the artist. While I do not interpret the image, the patient and I will work together to explore the metaphor and any personal meaning or feelings that are attached. Because the picture is something we can look at together, it gives both artist and therapist an opportunity to “do” something with it. Art therapy can empower the individual to find a solution or create a “preferable ending” in the art. It is interesting to note that creating artwork that challenges the initial feelings of hopelessness will actually affect the neural firing in the brain. The more practice a person has exploring “preferable endings” for example, the more this will result in the brain finding alternatives to self-destructive behavior. So making art can be a good practice for seeking solutions and reducing negative thoughts.

Is there a certain type of patient you think is more suited to art therapy as opposed to other therapy methods? 

Anyone who is willing to explore feelings through the process of making art can benefit from art therapy. Some people will naturally be drawn to this kind of therapy — children in particular where their natural language is through art and play.

Adolescents are also good candidates for art therapy because they may be resistant to traditional talk therapies and usually will enjoy working with art materials. I work with adults, however, and maintain that they are still children inside, as it is often an adult embodying that child state coming in to my office. The art helps bypass the defense and intellectualization inherent in verbal language. When a new (adult) patient is referred to me, I often start by asking, “Why do you think art therapy will help?” Right there, I am getting an alliance with the patient by suggesting that I believe that the experiential and creative nature of making art, in the company of an attuned art therapist, will make a difference.

What makes art therapy so powerful?

Art therapy is more than just making nice pictures. In fact, art therapy is more often a process of making ugly or messy pictures that depict a feeling state, not a final product that is all neat and tied together. Art therapy is about that creative process where the client, in the company of an art therapist, is working and re working problems via a range of fluid and variable art materials.

In private practice, I find the spontaneously created art pieces are the most meaningful and often help a person find resolution for specific traumatic experiences. The benefit occurs when the art made facilitates a sense of mastery over the problem. For example, a patient who has experienced years of abuse or neglect in childhood may be able to finally express feelings that had been avoided or pushed out of conscious awareness because they were overwhelming at the time. The images often speak more loudly than words. With the encouragement of the art therapist, difficult feelings can be expressed through making art.

The process varies widely so there is no one way to describe what happens in a session. When a person first faces a blank piece of paper, there might be some resistance or hesitancy to explore feelings so the resultant images may appear tight and controlled as in a line drawing or pencil sketch. But after some trust is established in the therapeutic relationship, the art process can move towards more expressive activity, which would suggest the patient is accessing stronger emotion. Often the patient will begin experimenting with more evocative materials at that point, for example using paint or clay to express feelings like anger, shame or fear. The art therapist is knowledgeable about psychological problems and the use of various art media; the process is flexible and individually focused to support the patient to find materials and techniques that connect with the issues at hand. And as a patient becomes more open to the process and discovers more creative resources within, the art product will also change. In art therapy, there is always that creative edge that keeps the process dynamic and contributes to the process of healing.

 

Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. 

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A Fresh New Year (When Naughty Becomes so Nice, Book 3) (Erotic Romance – Holiday Romance)

A Fresh New Year (When Naughty Becomes so Nice, Book 3) (Erotic Romance – Holiday Romance)


Andie Nichols had the best Christmas of her life with her boyfriend Ryan Miller. The kinky games they play with him as her sex slave just keep getting better and soon they never want to leave each other’s side. They decide to start living together, so they can make a fresh new start for the New Year. Unfortunately, her ex-boyfriend Evan Harrington isn’t ready to let her go. It all comes to a head at the New Year’s Eve Party, when Andie and Ryan declare their love for each other, and Evan vows to win her back or get his revenge. Will Andie’s New Year have a beginning that’s naughty or nice?

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Yellow Nice Pentagram Feather Decorative Writing Ballpoint Pen

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Ariana Grande on Niall Horan: He’s nice

Ariana Grande has spoken about the true nature of her relationship with One Direction star Niall Horan.
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Stage Door: Nice Girl

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There’s a tiny hint of A Glass Menagerie in Nice Girl, the Labyrinth Theater’s latest production, now at the Bank Street Theater. Jo, 38, lives at home with her demanding yet clingy mother. Twenty years ago, she had a scholarship to Radcliffe and a bright future. But all that changed in the blink of an eye.

Neither the spiritually dead, but well-intentioned Jo (Diane Davis), nor her undercutting mother Francine (Kathryn Kates), are capable of separating from their symbiotic, soul-crushing union.

Nice Girl is set in suburban Boston in 1984, doesn’t rise to the poetry of Williams, but it possesses a poignancy and moving tribute to working-class blues that’s touching in its simplicity.

And its examination of internecine warfare is quietly heartbreaking.

Poor Jo. She’s so defeated by life and loneliness that when her coworker, a feisty relationship-plagued Sherry (Liv Rooth) asks her what she dreams about, she registers a blank look.

Playwright Melissa Ross is adept at home truths and finding the dark humor in characters wrapped in the stench of failure. She’s aided by director Mimi O’Donnell, who allows her cast to discover the emotional landmines present in simple flirtations or the possibility of joy.

The 70-seat theater seems the ideal forum for a production that explores the destructive impact of a dream deferred.

It’s only when Jo clicks with Donny, a former high school classmate (Nick Cordero), a local butcher, that she even entertains the possibility of change. Or is hope just another illusion?

The cast is letter-perfect. Davis’ shy smile and stoic demeanor speaks volumes, while Kate’s undercutting widowed mother has a strange chemistry with her daughter. They are trapped by more than mere circumstance. Similarly, Cordero and Rooth, both seasoned, eclectic performers, acquit themselves well.

Nice girls don’t finish first, but in Ross’ hands, they leave a lasting impression.

Photo: Monique Carboni

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First Nighter: Emily Schwend’s ‘The Other Thing,’ Melissa Ross’ ‘Nice Girl’ on Nice Women or Otherwise

Sometimes at the theater, the women wrest it from the men — not quite that often, but sometimes. This is one of those weeks. I’m talking about The Other Thing, written by Emily Schwend and directed by Lucie Tiberghien, at Second Stage’s McGinn/Cazale Theatre Uptown, and Nice Girl, written by Melissa Ross and directed by Mimi O’Donnell, at Labyrinth’s current Bank Street Theatre home. It’s a rare combination of women helming works by women, but it’s just happened.

The Other Thing has another rare attribute in that it’s a ghost story for the stage. Or is it? Kim (Samantha Soule) is interviewing Carl (John Doman) on a subject about which she’s become obsessed: ghost-hunting. She listens to him describe his adventures for some time, also encountering his son Brady (James Kautz). She’s benignly taking notes and recording right up until something unexpected and intensely theatrical occurs that puts a jarring end to the first act.

At that point Kim — it could be Samantha Soule as herself — enters from the side, waving hello to someone or someones in the audience and says she’s going to tell a genuine ghost story. She starts talking about a little girl who unfortunately is witness to her mother’s murder. What she has to say begins to sound as if it might be connected to the first-act development.

When she’s completed the story, the next act begins with Kim in her bedroom where estranged boyfriend, Thomas (Bhavesh Patel), turns up to affect a reconciliation. (He still had keys.) Although Kim eventually acquiesces, she seems to be taken over by some unexplained force for a brief time. Then and suddenly, something like the incident that ended the first act takes place.

That’s when what has slowly been suggested about Kim — her own experiences with ghosts and how they’ve affected her — speeds up. As young Brady arrives to challenge Kim’s account of her visit to his dad and its abrupt conclusion, playwright Schwend reveals her preoccupation with ghosts more clearly. The hints — okay, they’re stronger than hints — are that the bodies piling up have more to do with Kim than she owns.

Ultimately, Schwend does let on what’s happening. Indeed, before she finishes her ghost story, she may have over-explained herself. What she has to confide about Kim and the relationship to her deceased(?) mother may be more than a savvy audience needs to learn, since they’ve already correctly figured it out.

What Schwend wants to establish about ghost proliferation — that more often than not their apparent appearance can be traced to emotional conflicts — is persuasive, and she has fun presenting her case on Kris Stone’s adaptable set. With the cast doing their utmost, under Tiberghien’s guidance to raise the play’s scare barometer, she keeps the play’s engine purring.

At the same time, and underlying her storyline, is the suggestion that unresolvable animosity between the sexes is rampant. As audience members exit the theater, they may be wondering whether that eternal man-woman anger isn’t something the playwright is working out for herself or on behalf of women friends. Whether or not, Schwend has conjured a rootin’-tootin’ escapade.

There’s no doubting that Ross’s Nice Girl has the appropriate title. Josephine (Diane Davis) is definitely a nice girl — not that she can always resist the temptation to swap sarcasms with habitually disapproving mother Francine (Kathryn Kates) in the modest David Meyer-designed home they share.

Josephine is getting closer to 40 than she’d like without being married, while feigning-illness Francine is wavering, at best, on the prospect of Josephine’s tying the knot with an eligible man. That man — former classmate, Donny (Nick Cordero) — turns up not too long after Josephine has run into him at his butcher shop and later that night encounters him again at a local nightclub where office pal, the fast-moving co-worker Sherry (Liv Rooth), has dragged her.

Apparently no longer married to his high school sweetheart, Donny turns out to be as nice a guy as Josephine is a nice girl — although there is a complication involving Sherry. As Josephine and Donny renew their friendship, they begin to show signs of having a future together, not that Francine doesn’t lodge objections and not that those objections don’t carry more weight with Josephine, despite the breakthroughs she and Donny make with each other. The respective honesty about their own failings is one of the strongest of dramatist Ross’s attractions.

Ross is writing about people who live their lives in quiet desperation around the kitchen table, on the front-porch swing, at their workaday jobs and during their unrewarding pastimes. She does a commendable job of capturing the plights of people who don’t expect happiness but are willing to settle for the best they think they can get. In this, she not only includes Josephine and Francine but Donny and Sherry as well. Making her melancholy point(s), she’s aided by her cast and director O’Donnell, who couldn’t be more sympathetic to the potentially deleterious effects of niceness.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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A Little Bit Naughty, a Little Bit Nice: These Wedding Dresses Are Fifty Shades-Chic

Looking for a wedding dress with a side of light bondage? These four—all from Hayley Paige’s spring 2015 runway—titillate with metal studs and strips of leather. (The entire top of dress No. 2 is leather,…




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Nice Try

Nice Try


When Murray Whelan, lovelorn political minder, and part-time fitness fanatic, is recruited to massage Australia’s bid for the Olympics, he has no idea how tough the going will get. Not even the sight of the gorgeous Holly Deloite in her taut blue leotard at the City Club can stop him diving head first into trouble. And, when the death of the young Aboriginal athlete Darcy Anderson proves that murder is a contact sport, Murray is soon breaking all the rules.

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MasterChef Recap: “Nice and Fudgy” in ‘Top 12 Compete’

Note: Do not read on if you have not seen Season 5, Episode 10 of FOXs “MasterChef,” titled “Top 12 Compete.”

2014-07-30-mc8.jpg

Hey, guys? Can someone tell my future mate to not propose to me on an episode of ‘MasterChef’ with scary Joe Bastianich lording over it all? Cool, thanks.

So tonight was all about romance and two teams — with Ahran and Elizabeth at the helms — had to cook for a bunch of couples. And Gordon Ramsey’s wife, who was wearing delectable yellow heels that made even Courtney gape in awe.

One team makes a lobster risotto. The other makes a sexy, yet undercooked, filet mignon. For dessert, they sort of look the same. Strangely, Leslie and Ahran make amends. Elizabeth keeps her cool plating goofy bowls of strawberries. Everything sort of goes smoothly. The Blue Team — with Elizabeth and Courtney and other front runners win. Christine, Cutter, Ahran, Leslie, Willie, and Christian have to make a bunch of truffles for a pressure test. Uh-oh.

Willie and Christian have no idea what they’re doing. Leslie’s rambling about throwing sexy truffles into his wife’s mouth. Yes, throwing. Cutter doesn’t even know what a truffle is. It’s not going to be easy.

Strangely, at the end of the test, they all look sort of OK. I would have no idea where to start (or I would just start licking the chocolate whipping bowl). Cutter actually comes through with dainty looking truffles. Gordon and the other chefs bust on him, but he’s officially rebounded. Christian has some tasty sounding truffles. Willie uses too many sprinkles. Ahran gets a grunt from Joe and that’s it. Leslie’s look like they would give his wife a concussion if he threw ’em at her. Christine goes classic on flavors. Sea salt and dark chocolate? Yes, please! But they’re also fugly.

The case of reality show producers calling the shots won in the end. Leslie is good drama. Christine just busts her butt and wants to win. I’m sort of bummed because I was hoping she was the underdog in this competition.

What were your favorite moments this week? Who’s next? Let me know @karenfratti or in the comments.

“MasterChef” airs Mondays at 8 p.m. ET on FOX.
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Nice Cotton Leopard Pattern Women Dresses

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Drugs Are Nice

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In 1987 in the small town of Dover, New Hampshire, Lisa and her best friend Rachel – both seventeen – set up a punk show at the Veteran’s Hall. When the headlining act got lost and drunk and never showed up, the audience was angry and the promoters hid in the bathroom. Then Lisa got an idea. The girls put on the ‘Saturday Night Fever’ soundtrack, mounted the stage, smoked cigars, caterwauled, took off their clothes and hit things and people. Suckdog – called ‘the most interesting band in the world’ by Melody Maker – was born. Lisa Carver left for Europe at the age of eighteen, quickly becoming a teen publisher (of the fanzines ‘Dirt’ and ‘Rollerderby’), a teen bride (to French performance artist Jean-Louis Costes), and a teen prostitute (turning her first trick a few days before turning 20).’Hustler’ called ‘Rollerderby’ ‘quite possibly the greatest zine ever’, and ‘The Utne Reader’ chooses Lisa Carver as one of the ‘100 Visionaries Who Will Change Your Life’. But when her baby was born in 1994 with a chromosomal deletion and his dad – industrial music maven and rumored neo-Nazi Boyd Rice – became violent, Lisa began to realize the life that needed changing was her own.A story of lasting lightness and surprising gravity, this is a book about the generation that wanted to break every rule. A definitive account of rules broken, left intact and re-written forever, it ripens into the classic account of an artist and a mother becoming an adult on her own terms.

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