Books of The Times: A Novel That Roiled India Is Now Translated Into English

In Perumal Murugan’s “One Part Woman,” a religious festival allows childless women to sleep with men other than their husbands, in the hope of becoming pregnant.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: ‘Crudo’ Is a Novel With a Real-Life Novelist in Thin Disguise

Olivia Laing’s first novel features a protagonist who bears a strong resemblance to the writer and performance artist Kathy Acker.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fear book: Amazon glitch mixes in L Ron Hubbard novel reviews

Reviews of a book by the founder of scientology are posted to Fear, about President Trump’s White House.
BBC News – Technology

SPECIALS DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

Fiction: Lee Child Reviews a Debut Novel That’s Vintage Texas Noir

Randy Kennedy’s “Presidio” follows the flight to the Mexican border of a car thief turned accidental kidnapper.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: A Debut Novel Mixes Lust With the Directionlessness of Youth

In Andrew Martin’s “Early Work,” the already shiftless life of a struggling writer is derailed by romantic infatuation.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Graphic novel on Man Booker list for first time

For the first time a graphic novel features on the Man Booker Prize longlist.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

ENTERTAINMENT SPECIALS:

Books News: The Obama-Biden Bromance Continues. This Time in a Mystery Novel.

In a new crime novel, the 44th president and his vice president team up to solve a suspicious death, and patch up their frayed friendship in the process.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: A Novel That Reads Like Martin Amis on Mescaline

A psychopathic but oddly charming coke dealer shoots and blusters his way through “The Price You Pay,” Aidan Truhen’s brilliant, blood-soaked thriller.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: Can Handiwork Save Your Soul? A Quiet Novel Suggests It Can

Daniel Gumbiner’s debut, “The Boatbuilder,” features an opioid addict who discovers the pleasures of physical labor.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: A Woman Sleeps a Year Away in Ottessa Moshfegh’s Darkly Comic New Novel

In “My Year of Rest and Relaxation,” a beautiful young Columbia graduate seeks spiritual renewal through slumber.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: A Darkly Comic Novel Stares Down a Life of Solitude

In “Mirror, Shoulder, Signal,” the Danish novelist Dorthe Nors continues her intense fascination with aging, and with women who have resisted domestication.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: A Mother Keeps Wartime Secrets in Michael Ondaatje’s New Novel

In “Warlight,” a man and his eccentric friends look after two teenagers in London after the children’s parents leave home for mysterious reasons.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Profile: A Debut Novel. A Tiny Press. A Pulitzer Finalist.

“In the Distance,” by Hernán Diaz, is a weird western about a lonely Swede traveling America’s frontier in the 1800s. It’s very good.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

How A Graphic Novel About A Dog Tells A Groundbreaking Story Of Trans Sex Work

“The Pervert” uses nostalgia-inducing characters to “fictionalize the trauma” of emotionally grueling stories.
Culture and Arts
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Fiction: The Heroes of This Novel Are Centuries Old and 300 Feet Tall

In “Overstory,” a magisterial new novel by Richard Powers, humans are merely underbrush; the real protagonists are trees.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: Meg Wolitzer’s New Novel Takes on the Politics of Women’s Mentorship

Lena Dunham on “The Female Persuasion” and its cultural relevance in our current political climate.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: Two Stories Harmonize in Lisa Halliday’s Deft Debut Novel

“Asymmetry” juxtaposes the story of a May-December romance (in which the man closely resembles Philip Roth) with the tragedy of an Iraqi-American family.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Profile: Lisa Halliday’s Debut Novel Is Drawing Comparisons to Philip Roth. Though Not for the Reasons You Might Think.

“Asymmetry” features a clandestine romance between a young editorial assistant and a famous, much older novelist.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: A Novel That Asks, What if Abortion Were Again Illegal?

“Red Clocks,” by Leni Zumas, imagines a dystopian near-future in which women are once again stripped of reproductive freedoms.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Essay: How Langston Hughes Brought His Radical Vision to the Novel

Poor black lives weren’t depicted in the serious fiction of Hughes’s day. As Angela Flournoy notes, his debut novel, “Not Without Laughter,” changed that.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: After ‘Mad Men,’ Matthew Weiner Turns to a Novel of Madmen

A psychopathic construction worker, a violently overprotective father and an adolescent girl form a dangerous triangle in “Heather, the Totality.”
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: Shades of Atwood and Vonnegut in Louise Erdrich’s Dystopian Novel

“Future Home of the Living God,” in the form of a 26-year-old woman’s diary, depicts a future when glitches in evolution are joined by widespread social deterioration.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Profile: Krysten Ritter Spins Her Own Mystery in Her Debut Novel, ‘Bonfire’

The star of the Netflix superhero noir series “Jessica Jones” delves into a small town’s secrets in her new book.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: A Gentler Jack Reacher Emerges in Lee Child’s Latest Novel

“The Midnight Line” has “more emotional heft than anything Child has written before.”
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: Stephen King and Son Team Up for a Novel About Women Whose Sleep Should Not Be Disturbed

In “Sleeping Beauties,” by Stephen King and his son Owen, women who fall asleep don’t wake up, and grow tendrils that are best left alone.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: Faulkner and Other Ghosts Sing Through Jesmyn Ward’s New Novel

Ward’s third novel, “Sing, Unburied, Sing,” follows a tender teenager and his drug-addicted mother on a road trip.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: Portrait of a Nigerian Marriage in a Heartbreaking Debut Novel

Ayobami Adebayo’s “Stay With Me,” like great works by Chinua Achebe and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, explores the pull between tradition and modernity in Nigeria.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

John Green’s Next Novel Has A Release Date

This will be the first novel in six years (!!!) for the “Fault in Our Stars” author.
Arts
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Fiction: A Novel Looks Back at a Woman’s Idealistic Days in the Spanish Civil War

The Spanish Civil War casts its shadow over an elderly 21st-century American and her granddaughter in Mary Gordon’s novel “There Your Heart Lies.”
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Sarah Jessica Parker Selects Novel About American Muslims For Her New Publishing Imprint

The novel by an up-and-coming writer tells the story of an Indian-American family in California.
Arts
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Books of The Times: Review: Francis Spufford’s First Novel Is a Swashbuckling Tale

“Golden Hill” follows the misadventures of a handsome young stranger who arrives in New York from London, hoping to cash in on a fortune.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: A Spirited Widow and a Monstrous Serpent Propel a Lush Novel

Sarah Perry’s “The Essex Serpent” is part ghost story and part natural history lesson, part romance and part feminist parable.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Your Next Summer Read Is A Novel About Lonely People Grasping For Connections

It should feel like too much to smash together a book about undiagnosable illnesses and New Age alternative remedies with a book about a New Age relationship experiment run by a narcissistic celebrity with a book about the dehumanizing gig economy with a book about growing up under Voluntaryist religious fundamentalism. The genius of Catherine Lacey lies in the fact that her new book, The Answers, doesn’t feel like too much; the pieces are bizarre and timely and fit together like puzzle pieces into a somehow timeless examination of humanity.

Lacey’s heroine has been backed into a corner. Raised by fundamentalist Christians in a rural home, she had no official documents or real contact with the outside culture until she left home as a teenager and moved in with an aunt, who renamed her from “Junia” to “Mary.” Now in New York, she’s drifted out of touch with her family. She has one dear friend, who has left on a mysterious quest of self-fulfillment. She has a job at a travel agency that barely keeps the lights on. And she has a mysterious, debilitating illness with no diagnosis. She sees doctors and specialists as her symptoms shift and worsen, but no one can put a finger on the root cause. Finally, she’s found a treatment that works ― PAKing, an alternative therapy that seems similar to reiki ― but that demands significant out-of-pocket expenditures.

So she decides, like so many young people crushed by debt and lack of opportunity today, to find a side hustle.

In another novel, that side hustle might have been driving for a ride-share or nannying the children of New York’s elite. In Lacey’s universe, nothing is so obvious. Mary responds to a mysterious help-wanted ad, then finds herself auditioning for a lavishly paid gig as, it turns out, the Emotional Girlfriend to movie star Kurt Sky. She’s both a guinea pig in an experiment to better understand the ideal relationship and an emotional laborer hired to keep the self-involved Kurt satisfied romantically. Scientists behind the scenes may be pulling the levers, but he’s providing the funding and reaping the immediate benefits of having carefully cast girlfriends to provide him with emotional support; for sex, for silent companionship, for arguing and for intellectual conversation.

This setup, dazzling and yet sinister as it may be, has little excitement for Mary. Being deprived of intimacy after her one relationship fell apart and her one friend disappeared on her seems to make her less particular about who she gives her time to ― besides, she needs the money. But she doesn’t much enjoy listening to Kurt’s emotional turmoil and responding in the directed fashion. He, on the other hand, finds himself fascinated by her quiet, submissive demeanor and her ability to listen with apparent interest for hours. (Naturally the Intellectual Girlfriend, with her frequently expressed opinions and education, soon wearies him.) He demands more and more of her time; soon, the experiment has transformed from a weird side gig to an all-consuming lifestyle that demands her to alienate herself from her own emotional needs to be what her boss asks. Still desperate to finish her PAK therapy, she clings to the unsettling but well-paying job.

As the novel progresses, we move in and out of Mary’s perspective to hear from Kurt, who muses on his failed past relationships and the movie he’s been trying to perfect in edits for 10 years; his obsessively devoted personal assistant, Matheson, who resents Kurt’s increasing dependence on Mary; and other women who participate in the project, particularly Ashley. A boxer with a burning grudge, she agrees to be Kurt’s Anger Girlfriend, only to find herself drawn back into a youthful trauma that threatens to blow up the whole experiment.

Lacey’s prose radiates elegance beneath its unassuming, unflashy surface; there’s nary a maladroit word or an unrevealing detail. She skillfully balances a truly absurd array of hot-button topics and weird narrative twists, playing them off each other virtuosically to weave a surreal-feeling story with deeply pragmatic concerns: How do we come to know ourselves? How do we become part of our community? What should we sacrifice to give a partner what they need? What should we demand from each other? Can a relationship be satisfying to us without dehumanizing our partner? How do we reconcile our personal fulfillment with the increasingly all-encompassing demands of simply staying alive in this economy? What are the limits of technology and science to provide us with happiness?

The Answers offers no answers, of course. Instead, in its stark portraits of bewildered, alienated people, it lays bare the unresolvable paradoxes of need that we all hold in our hearts.

The Bottom Line:

Lacey searches for the unanswerable human questions that drive us in her novel of lonely, lost New Yorkers grasping for connection in alienated modern society.

What other reviewers think:

NYT: “This is a novel of intellect and amplitude that deepens as it moves forward, until you feel prickling awe at how much mental territory unfolds.”

Kirkus: “With otherworldly precision and subtle wit, Lacey creates a gently surreal dreamscape that’s both intoxicating and profound.”

Who wrote it?

Catherine Lacey has written one previous novel, Nobody Is Ever Missing. She has won a Whiting Award and was selected as one of Granta’s Best Young American Writers.

Who will read it?

Fans of fiction that blends the surreal with realism, such as Murakami.

Opening lines:

“I’d run out of options. That’s how these things usually happen, how a person ends up placing all her last hopes on a stranger, hoping that whatever that stranger might do to her would be the thing she needed done to her.

For so long I had been a person who needed other people to do things to me, and for so long no one had done the right thing to me, but already I’m getting ahead of myself. That’s one of my problems, I’m told, getting ahead of myself, so I’ve been trying to find a way to get behind myself, to be slow and quiet with myself like Ed used to be. But of course I can’t quite make it work, can’t be exactly who Ed was to me.”

Notable passage:

“I looked at his face in the pale dawn, sleeping or just still, and I let myself completely feel the pain of missing a person who no longer exists. Not missing a person who has died, not mourning (I had yet to feel actual grief), but the strain of trying to see the person I’d fallen in love with inside the person he had become. Now I know this just comes with love, that there’s no way to avoid seeing a person gradually erased or warped by time, but the first time I realized this with Paul ― it felt apocryphal.”

The Answers
By Catherine Lacey
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $ 26.00
Published June 6, 2017

Buy on Amazon or your local indie bookstore

The Bottom Line is a weekly review combining plot description and analysis with fun tidbits about the book.

type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related… + articlesList=59246c01e4b03b485cb59cdc,58f81c8be4b0cb086d7df747,58ffc5bae4b00bba16f99d4b,58e63ca6e4b0fe4ce0889b25,58e2bf22e4b03a26a36545da

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Books of The Times: Soft Children Confront a Hard World in Maile Meloy’s New Novel

In “Do Not Become Alarmed,” six children vanish while on vacation with their parents in Central America.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: Arundhati Roy’s Long-Awaited Novel Is an Ambitious Look at Turmoil in India

“The Ministry of Utmost Happiness” comes 20 years after Roy’s celebrated debut novel, “The God of Small Things.”
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Books of The Times: Elizabeth Strout’s Lovely New Novel Is a Requiem for Small-Town Pain

In “Anything Is Possible,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Olive Kitteridge” writes with a frank, unapologetic emphasis on forbidden desire.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Modeling Was Never Enough for Cara Delevingne: How She Parlayed Her Empire Into Film, Activism and Now… a Novel!

Cara DelevigneCara Delevingne continues to find new ways to prove she’s more than just a pretty face.
We came to know and love the British beauty back in 2011, when at 20-years-old she walked her…

E! Online (US) – Top Stories

Special Entertainment News Bulletin:


Check Groupon First

Why ‘The Outsiders’ Lives On: A Teenage Novel Turns 50

S.E. Hinton’s classic endures as teenagers continue to relate to its rebellious characters.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Global Migration Meets Magic in Mohsin Hamid’s Timely Novel

Mr. Hamid’s “Exit West” seems poised to become one of this year’s most important literary works.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

A Once-Forgotten Novel Unites Turkish Readers in Troubled Times

“Madonna in a Fur Coat,” a love story written by Sabahattin Ali nearly 75 years ago, has improbably become a best seller.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

In a Walt Whitman Novel, Lost for 165 Years, Clues to ‘Leaves of Grass’

A digital sleuth has discovered an anonymously published 1852 serial novel by the poet, which survived in only a single copy of an obscure newspaper.
NYT > Arts

SPECIAL TRAVEL DISCOUNTS:
Orbitz Worldwide Inc

Reader’s Notebook: A Different Kind of Dystopian Novel

In Philip Roth’s 2004 alternative history, Charles Lindbergh is in the White House, cozying up to the Third Reich.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: Death and Disaster Stalk the Characters in Margaret Drabble’s New Novel

Margaret Drabble’s “The Dark Flood Rises” is a fictional road trip through various forms of “senior living” in Britain.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: Colson Whitehead on George Saunders’s Novel About Lincoln and Lost Souls

George Saunders’s first novel, “Lincoln in the Bardo,” imagines the president visiting the graveyard where his young son has just been buried.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: It Takes a Commune: John Irving on a Novel About Growing Up Utopian

In Kevin Wilson’s “Perfect Little World,” a single mother joins a psychologist’s experiment in collective parenting.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Fiction: Monica Ali on Rachel Cusk’s Risky, Revolutionary New Novel

“Transit” is the second novel in a trilogy by Rachel Cusk that began with “Outline.”
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Essay: Reading the Classic Novel That Predicted Trump

The protagonist of Sinclair Lewis’s 1935 novel “It Can’t Happen Here” sees something dark brewing in American politics.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

BBC to adapt John le Carre novel for new TV series

Following the success of The Night Manager, the BBC is to adapt The Spy Who Came In From The Cold.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:


Max, The Blind Guy (a digital serial novel – PART III)

Max, The Blind Guy (a digital serial novel – PART III)


Published in 12 PARTS, beginning June 12, 2015 with a new part available at four-week intervals. This continues the saga of Max & Greta Ruth. PART III: O – Though I Walk Through the Valley of Death; Before I Drink from the Waters of Lethe; Prague #3This is the continuing story of Maximilian and Greta Ruth, their 40-year relationship, and all the demons that show up as they find that life rarely goes according to plan. Maximilian Ruth daydreams in colors which his eyes can no longer see. His wife is leading them on a European tour: Prague, Vienna, Salzburg, and Venice. Greta Ruth calls this trip their “last hurrah.”She hasn’t had the best from 40 years with Max. But Max takes their life differently: marriage is an affair of more than the heart’s journey. This pair of American originals have known passion, riches, and sorrow. Today, these roads lead them through Europe’s famed cities, but Greta wonders if the plan will see her through to the promised “champagne on the Grand Canal.”Their Elite Travel tour-mates are getting on each other’s nerves. They are characters found next door, on everyday streets, under black-eye days, and across lost-memory nights. The highlights and sights, the posh lunches, the gamy conversation over drinks in the bar – and of course the “tour friendships” – all make their faux-camaraderie sometimes combative but never boring.A story rife with modern perils – too much time, too much money, just enough libido, secrets revealed – Max and Greta Ruth don’t wait for what the future may bring.”Max, the blind guy” is a complex, emotional story of art, ego, love, and marriage. Beyer’s nuanced story brings to life fictional characters from America and Europe as this group of recalcitrant travelers make their way travel through lovely cities and desperate thoughts.

Price: $
Sold by Kobo UK

Fiction: Zadie Smith’s New Novel Takes on Dance, Fame and Friendship

As two girls grow up, and apart, in Zadie Smith’s “Swing Time,” subtle distinctions in family structure and class magnify over time.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Famous After Death: A Novel

Famous After Death: A Novel


Noel Hammersmith used to have dreams of fame as a playwright, not to mention personal happiness. But in 1984 his girlfriend has just decamped, he’s putting on poundage by the day, and his literary success stems from the self-help tomes he edits at Acropolis Books–an outfit he can’t help calling Necropolis. Yes, this New Yorker is a dab hand at acquiring and then whittling down titles such as The All-Poison Diet and the stroke-of-genius alphabet series (which includes H Is for Hemorrhoid and P Is for Premature Ejaculation). What he’s not so good at is keeping his own weight–and consumerist obsessions–under control. As the hero of Benjamin Cheever’s Famous After Death becomes increasingly preoccupied with false advertising and corporate irresponsibility, he mounts a hilarious letter-writing campaign. Suffice it to say that the discontinuation of the Brooks Brothers Blue and the culinary degradation of Gerber Baby Food are very much on Noel’s mind. But there are hints that he’s involved in a deadlier sideline. Is he in fact the infamous Wordsworth Bomber, a man for whom “quality control was an issue worth killing people for”? Cheever’s third novel is an artful mix of Noel’s correspondence and journals. His transcriptions of his psychiatric visits alone are worth the price of admission. But this burlesque is also a serious–and seriously funny–examination of the distance between our values and the goods we seem to value more. Of course, in an
List Price: 31.94
Price:

Little Beauties: A Novel

Little Beauties: A Novel


The lives of three characters — an obsessive-compulsive, a pregnant teenager, and the teen’s unborn child — come together in National Book Award finalist and Pushcart Prize winner Kim Addonizio’s unsparingly funny and transcendent debut novel. Diana McBride, a thirty-four-year-old former child pageant contender, now works in a baby store in Long Beach. Between dealing with a catastrophic haircut, the failure of her marriage, and phone calls from her alcoholic mother, Diana has gone off her OCD medication and is trying to cope via washing and cleaning rituals. When pregnant teenager Jamie Ramirez enters the store, Diana’s already chaotic world is sent spinning. Jamie can’t stand being pregnant. She can’t wait to get on with her normal life and give the baby up for adoption. But her yet-to-be-born daughter, Stella, has a fierce will and a destiny to fulfill. And as the magical plot of Little Beauties unfolds, these three characters’ lives become linked in ever more surprising ways. With a poet’s ear for fresh, evocative language and a deft humor that exposes her characters’ foibles, Addonizio perfectly captures the messiness and unexpected beauty of life.
List Price: 22.94
Price:

A Very Good Life (Dana McGarry Novel) (Volume 1)

A Very Good Life (Dana McGarry Novel) (Volume 1)


A Very Good Life ranked #1 for 26 hours on Amazon’s list of Top 100 Free E-books in Literature & Fiction………Although A Very Good Life, takes place in 1970s New York City, the emotional story transcends any period. Dana McGarry is an “it” girl, living a privileged lifestyle of a well-heeled junior executive at B. Altman, a high end department store. With a storybook husband and a fairytale life, change comes swiftly and unexpectedly. Cracks begin to appear in the perfect facade. Challenged at work by unethical demands, and the growing awareness that her relationship with her distant husband is strained, Dana must deal with the unwanted changes in her life. Can she find her place in the new world where women can have a voice, or will she allow herself to be manipulated into doing things that go against her growing self-confidence? � A Very Good Life�chronicles the perils and rewards of Dana’s journey, alongside some of the most legendary women of the twentieth century. From parties at Caf� des Artistes to the annual Rockefeller Center Christmas tree lighting ceremony, from meetings with business icons like Est�e Lauder to cocktail receptions with celebrity guests like legendary Vogue editor Diana Vreeland. Steward’s intimate knowledge of the period creates the perfect backdrop for this timeless story about a woman’s quest for self-fulfillment
List Price: 18.24
Price:

Two to Go: A Novel

Two to Go: A Novel


Med students Phil and Frank have big plans for their future. Part-time jobs at Ron Todd’s World of Chickens seemed like the perfect way to earn a few bucks on the way. But Phil’s stuck out in front in the chicken suit trying to lure in reluctant customers and Frank’s suffering from the fast-food grind in back frying burgers. Now that both of them are falling for Ron’s wife and daughter, Frank’s dream of being a surgeon and Phil’s secret desire to be a film-maker are put on the back burner. Suddenly, Phil becomes a reluctant and altogether unexpected oracle on dental health, strategic planning, and marriage guidance.
List Price: 18.94
Price:

Streets of Gold (The Novel)

Streets of Gold (The Novel)


Hustle the beautifully gritty streets of Los Angeles in the shoes of a 14-year-old gang pledge and a wealthy entrepreneur playboy who live a mile apart but would never cross paths. until now. Scooby grew up believing a brutal LA gang, the Lords Latino, was responsible for putting food on his family’s table. Now, still too young to shave, he has a chance to join his brother in the gang and help provide for his baby sister. First, though, he must survive initiation: being beaten-possibly to death-or committing an unthinkable crime. In the same city but a different world, payday loan scion Tom Milford would rather be partying the night away with (yet another) model, but after insensitive comments land his company in a PR quagmire, his very public act of contrition takes him to a rough-around-the-edges part of town, where bad timing places him at the center of Scooby s initiation. Their violent clash triggers a series of events that rapidly spirals out of control, putting both lives in the crosshairs and bringing tensions that have long simmered just below the city’s surface to a boil, drawing young and old, poor and rich, powerful and powerless into a battle that threatens to destroy them all.

Price: $
Sold by Kobo UK

Max, The Blind Guy (a digital serial novel – PART IX)

Max, The Blind Guy (a digital serial novel – PART IX)


Published in 12 PARTS, beginning June 12, 2015 with a new part available at four-week intervals. This continues the saga of Max & Greta Ruth. PART IX: Before I Drink from the Waters of Lethe; O – Though I Walk Through the Valley of Death. ; Salzburg #2 (part 1)This is the continuing story of Maximilian and Greta Ruth, their 40-year relationship, and all the demons that show up as they find that life rarely goes according to plan. Maximilian Ruth daydreams in colors which his eyes can no longer see. His wife is leading them on a European tour: Prague, Vienna, Salzburg, and Venice. Greta Ruth calls this trip their “last hurrah.”She hasn’t had the best from 40 years with Max. But Max takes their life differently: marriage is an affair of more than the heart’s journey. This pair of American originals have known passion, riches, and sorrow. Today, these roads lead them through Europe’s famed cities, but Greta wonders if the plan will see her through to the promised “champagne on the Grand Canal.”Their Elite Travel tour-mates are getting on each other’s nerves. They are characters found next door, on everyday streets, under black-eye days, and across lost-memory nights. The highlights and sights, the posh lunches, the gamy conversation over drinks in the bar – and of course the “tour friendships” – all make their faux-camaraderie sometimes combative but never boring.A story rife with modern perils – too much time, too much money, just enough libido, secrets revealed – Max and Greta Ruth don’t wait for what the future may bring.”Max, the blind guy” is a complex, emotional story of art, ego, love, and marriage. Beyer’s nuanced story brings to life fictional characters from America and Europe as this group of recalcitrant travelers make their way travel through lovely cities and desperate thoughts.

Price: $
Sold by Kobo UK

The Chase (A Noble Dimensions Novel)

The Chase (A Noble Dimensions Novel)


Brew Lloyd, openly gay, returns to his hometown of Noble, Nevada, to live in his parents home while they travel to see his dying uncle. Brews been gone since graduation, avoiding his gay-hating father, yet all the while taking the money offered to him almost as a bribe from his father for not accepting him or his sexual orientation. Upon his return, his lawyer-father maneuvers him into securing a summer job at a ranch called The Chase. There, Brew finds himself face-to-face with an old fantasy-the ranchers son Chase, former football hero at the local high school, a soft-spoken and dynamite-looking young man. Chase has struggled with his sexuality for years, and has shunned dating in favor of staying on the ranch. Unable to come to terms with his frequent fantasies of a young man hed secretly admired in high school, Chase pours his emotions into hidden erotic writing. But now, when he sees Brew again after many years, hes forced to confront his hot desire for the glib guy whos not shy about his own sexual preference. As these two men grow closer, two other men stand in their way. The first is a federal agent, who taunts Chase with the news that part of the ranch is being reclaimed by the BLM, the agency that owns most of Nevadas rangeland and mining concerns. The other man is Brews lawyer-father, whos been helping long-distance in the fight against the BLM, and who cannot guess that his own son Brew is having an affair with a manly ex-football player. Can two sensuous young men expose the crooked federal agent, cope with a hateful parents prejudice, and still find unbridled joy together?

Price: $
Sold by Kobo U.S

Little Beauties: A Novel

Little Beauties: A Novel


The lives of three characters — an obsessive-compulsive, a pregnant teenager, and the teen’s unborn child — come together in National Book Award finalist and Pushcart Prize winner Kim Addonizio’s unsparingly funny and transcendent debut novel. Diana McBride, a thirty-four-year-old former child pageant contender, now works in a baby store in Long Beach. Between dealing with a catastrophic haircut, the failure of her marriage, and phone calls from her alcoholic mother, Diana has gone off her OCD medication and is trying to cope via washing and cleaning rituals. When pregnant teenager Jamie Ramirez enters the store, Diana’s already chaotic world is sent spinning. Jamie can’t stand being pregnant. She can’t wait to get on with her normal life and give the baby up for adoption. But her yet-to-be-born daughter, Stella, has a fierce will and a destiny to fulfill. And as the magical plot of Little Beauties unfolds, these three characters’ lives become linked in ever more surprising ways. With a poet’s ear for fresh, evocative language and a deft humor that exposes her characters’ foibles, Addonizio perfectly captures the messiness and unexpected beauty of life.
List Price: 26.99
Price:

�Scandalosa!: A Honey Blonde Chica Novel (Honey Blonde Chica Novels)

�Scandalosa!: A Honey Blonde Chica Novel (Honey Blonde Chica Novels)


Evie Gomez finally has it all: a sweet boyfriend, two mejor amigas, and an upcoming sixtee�era that’s the talk of the school. Qu� cool, no? Too bad reality has a way of ruining things. When her grades start to slip, Evie’s parents threaten to cancel her party. The good news? All she has to do is volunteer in the community to raise her grades. The bad news? Since it’s the middle of the semester, the best remaining option is working at the Southern California Horse Reserve. Then again…ranchero life? Charros? Maybe things will work out after all. Or maybe not. Things with boyfriend Alex start to fizzle, party-girl pal Raquel slides down a spiral of boys and booze, Dee Dee — who only recently re-entered Evie’s life — considers moving back to Mexico City, and to top it all off, Evie’s flirting with someone she never expected to like — ranch hand Arturo (even with his que fugly cowboy boots). Things can’t get m�s complicated…can they?
List Price: 18.98
Price:

�Scandalosa!: A Honey Blonde Chica Novel (Honey Blonde Chica Novels)

�Scandalosa!: A Honey Blonde Chica Novel (Honey Blonde Chica Novels)


Evie Gomez finally has it all: a sweet boyfriend, two mejor amigas, and an upcoming sixtee�era that’s the talk of the school. Qu� cool, no? Too bad reality has a way of ruining things. When her grades start to slip, Evie’s parents threaten to cancel her party. The good news? All she has to do is volunteer in the community to raise her grades. The bad news? Since it’s the middle of the semester, the best remaining option is working at the Southern California Horse Reserve. Then again…ranchero life? Charros? Maybe things will work out after all. Or maybe not. Things with boyfriend Alex start to fizzle, party-girl pal Raquel slides down a spiral of boys and booze, Dee Dee — who only recently re-entered Evie’s life — considers moving back to Mexico City, and to top it all off, Evie’s flirting with someone she never expected to like — ranch hand Arturo (even with his que fugly cowboy boots). Things can’t get m�s complicated…can they?
List Price: 19.98
Price:

Shoe Addicts Anonymous: A Novel

Shoe Addicts Anonymous: A Novel


Kick off your Keds (unless you''re driving) and meet a motley group of D.C. women who bond over designer shoes. It''s chick lit with heart and sole. -People magazineFour different women. One common shoe size. Helene Zaharis''s politician husband keeps her on a tight leash and cancels her credit cards as a way of controlling her. Lorna Rafferty is up to her eyeballs in debt and can''t stop her addiction to eBay. Sandra Vanderslice can''t leave the house and pays her shoe bills by working as a phone-sex operator. And Jocelyn Bowen (who barely knows a sole from a heel) is a nanny for the family from hell and will do anything to get out of the house.And a shared lust for fabulous footwear.On Tuesday nights, these women meet to trade shoes and, in the process, form friendships that will help them each triumph over their problems-from secret pasts to blackmail, bankruptcy, and dating. Funny, emotional, and powerful, Beth Harbison''s Shoe Addicts Anonymous is a perfect read for any woman who has ever struggled to find the perfect fit.Reading this novel is like eating a slice of cake. -Publishers Weekly
List Price:
Price:

Mystery Girl: A Novel

Mystery Girl: A Novel


When Sam Kornberg's wife, Lala, walks out on him, he's an unemployed used-book store clerk and failed experimental novelist with a broken heart. Desperate to win her back, he takes a job as assistant detective to the enigmatic Solar Lonsky, a private eye who might be an eccentric and morbid genius or just a morbidly obese madman. It's a simple tail job, following a beautiful and mysterious lady around L.A., but Sam soon finds himself helplessly falling for his quarry and hopelessly entangled in a murder case involving Satanists, succubi, underground filmmakers, Hollywood bigshots, Mexican shootouts, video-store geekery, and sexy doppelgangers from beyond the grave. A case that highlights the risks of hardcore reading and mourns the death of the novel ? or perhaps just the decline of Western civilization. Mystery Girl is a thriller about the dangers of marriage and a detective story about the unsolvable mysteries of love, art, and other people.
List Price:
Price:

Little Beauties: A Novel

Little Beauties: A Novel


Diana McBride, a thirty-four-year-old former child pageant contender, now works in a baby store in Long Beach. Between dealing with a catastrophic haircut, the failure of her marriage, and phone calls from her alcoholic mother, Diana has gone off her OCD medication and is trying to cope via washing and cleaning rituals. When pregnant teenager Jamie Ramirez enters the store, Diana''s already chaotic world is sent spinning.Jamie can''t stand being pregnant. She can''t wait to get on with her normal life and give the baby up for adoption. But her yet-to-be-born daughter, Stella, has a fierce will and a destiny to fulfill. And as the magical plot of Little Beauties unfolds, these three characters'' lives become linked in ever more surprising ways.
List Price:
Price:

Two To Go: A Novel

Two To Go: A Novel


Med students Phil and Frank have big plans for their future. Part-time jobs at Ron Todd''s World of Chickens seemed like the perfect way to earn a few bucks on the way. But Phil''s stuck out in front in the chicken suit trying to lure in reluctant customers and Frank''s suffering from the fast-food grind in back frying burgers. Now that both of them are falling for Ron''s wife and daughter, Frank''s dream of being a surgeon and Phil''s secret desire to be a film-maker are put on the back burner. Suddenly, Phil becomes a reluctant and altogether unexpected oracle on dental health, strategic planning, and marriage guidance.
List Price:
Price:

Mystery Girl: A Novel

Mystery Girl: A Novel


When Sam Kornberg's wife, Lala, walks out on him, he's an unemployed used-book store clerk and failed experimental novelist with a broken heart. Desperate to win her back, he takes a job as assistant detective to the enigmatic Solar Lonsky, a private eye who might be an eccentric and morbid genius or just a morbidly obese madman. It's a simple tail job, following a beautiful and mysterious lady around L.A., but Sam soon finds himself helplessly falling for his quarry and hopelessly entangled in a murder case involving Satanists, succubi, underground filmmakers, Hollywood bigshots, Mexican shootouts, video-store geekery, and sexy doppelgangers from beyond the grave. A case that highlights the risks of hardcore reading and mourns the death of the novel ? or perhaps just the decline of Western civilization. Mystery Girl is a thriller about the dangers of marriage and a detective story about the unsolvable mysteries of love, art, and other people.
List Price:
Price:

Little Beauties: A Novel

Little Beauties: A Novel


The lives of three characters — an obsessive-compulsive, a pregnant teenager, and the teen''s unborn child — come together in National Book Award finalist and Pushcart Prize winner Kim Addonizio''s unsparingly funny and transcendent debut novel. Diana McBride, a thirty-four-year-old former child pageant contender, now works in a baby store in Long Beach. Between dealing with a catastrophic haircut, the failure of her marriage, and phone calls from her alcoholic mother, Diana has gone off her OCD medication and is trying to cope via washing and cleaning rituals. When pregnant teenager Jamie Ramirez enters the store, Diana''s already chaotic world is sent spinning. Jamie can''t stand being pregnant. She can''t wait to get on with her normal life and give the baby up for adoption. But her yet-to-be-born daughter, Stella, has a fierce will and a destiny to fulfill. And as the magical plot of Little Beauties unfolds, these three characters'' lives become linked in ever more surprising ways. With a poet''s ear for fresh, evocative language and a deft humor that exposes her characters'' foibles, Addonizio perfectly captures the messiness and unexpected beauty of life.
List Price:
Price:

Mystery Girl: A Novel (Unabridged)

Mystery Girl: A Novel (Unabridged)

When Sam Kornberg’s wife, Lala, walks out on him, he’s an unemployed used-book store clerk and failed experimental novelist with a broken heart. Desperate to win her back, he takes a job as assistant detective to the enigmatic Solar Lonsky, a private eye who might be an eccentric and morbid genius or just a morbidly obese madman.

It’s a simple tail job, following a beautiful and mysterious lady around L.A., but Sam soon finds himself helplessly falling for his quarry and hopelessly entangled in a murder case involving Satanists, succubi, underground filmmakers, Hollywood bigshots, Mexican shootouts, video-store geekery, and sexy doppelgangers from beyond the grave. A case that highlights the risks of hardcore reading and mourns the death of the novel – or perhaps just the decline of Western civilization.

Mystery Girl is a thriller about the dangers of marriage and a detective story about the unsolvable mysteries of love, art, and other people.

List Price:
Price:

A Billionaire Ex (Novel Edition)

A Billionaire Ex (Novel Edition)


Maria Lawson is 32 years old, divorced, and stuck in a rut with her life. When attending a wedding with her friend, she’s informed her now ex-husband, Jack Styles, has become a billionaire, and is the CEO of one of the most successful companies in the country. After spending a night in jail, the two meet again. Much to Maria’s surprise, Jack is no longer the dorky yet handsome man she once loved, but smug and arrogant to the point it upsets her. Feeling slighted by his success, and the rumours she thinks he’s been spreading about her and their relationship, she decides to go behind enemy lines in order to set things right. However, when she’s working at Jack’s company, she begins to find that not everything is as it seems, and her petty schemes begin to make way for dormant feelings to rise again. Was fate giving them both a second chance? And if it was, would it really work out for them this time? Erotic Romance – Novel – 90,000 Words

Price: $
Sold by Kobo Canada

First Edition Of ‘The Hobbit’ Sets Record Price For J.R.R. Tolkien’s Novel

It didn’t come from the mines of Erebor, but it’s definitely worth a fortune.

A first edition copy of “The Hobbit” sold for £137,000 (nearly $ 210,000) at a Sotheby’s auction in London earlier this week, more than doubling the previous record for a copy of J.R.R. Tolkien’s first novel.

The book had been given to one of his former students, Katherine Kilbride, in 1937. The Guardian notes that Tolkien inscribed it with a poem in Old English, which roughly translates to:

“There is many a thing in the West-regions unknown to me, marvels and strange beings, a land fair and lovely, the homeland of the Elves, and the bliss of the Gods …”

Tolkien inscribed very few copies of the novel upon publication, Sotheby’s said. Other lucky recipients included close friend C.S. Lewis, author of the Chronicles of Narnia series. Take a look at the book below.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Carnegie Mellon Students Create Interactive Graphic Novel To Teach How To Stop Sexual Assault

A class at Carnegie Mellon University has created an interactive graphic novel aimed at helping students better understand how to spot warning signs and intervene to stop sexual assault in real social situations.

The online game, “Decisions that Matter,” walks users through various scenarios on campus. Your character might experience catcalling, notice someone being groped by a friend or go to a party where a sexual assault may or may not take place, depending on the choices you make. The game is meant to provide a better way for students to understand how an approach called “bystander intervention” actually works.

cmu decisions that matter

The class’ goal was to create something students wouldn’t “roll their eyes” at, unlike some other products on the market.

“We think this is really different — a welcome experience — that makes people want to think harder about it,” said Andy Norman, an adjunct faculty member in CMU’s philosophy department.

“One of the things I first said when they came to me,” said Jessica Klein, CMU’s coordinator of gender programs and sexual violence prevention, “I said, ‘I am so tired of these cheesy products with these standard stock photos of white people in a business setting.’ It’s so not relatable.”

In fact, the students are so pleased with their project, they’re offering it for free to other colleges to use in their freshman orientation programs. Klein said her office is discussing how they’ll incorporate it into their own schoolwide efforts. One possibility is that the school will hold small group sessions, perhaps within a fraternity or led by a resident adviser, where students can play through the game and then discuss it.

cmuahole

The interdisciplinary project course is designed to combine social sciences with technology in ways that address actual issues in society. The class, part of CMU’s Entertainment Technology Center, went through 30 revisions of the game’s script and play-tested the results. Students were trying to guard against elements “that sounded corny or sounded too preachy, or [where] the point was too obvious,” Norman said.

“They worked very hard to make sure the story is not predictable and the answers you are expected to give are not predictable,” he explained.

cmuummm
cmu well it might

Savannah Badalich, a student at the University of California, Los Angeles, noted with approval that the game includes “a diverse group of students saying things students would actually say.”

“I love that it covers sexual harassment, and in a real setting off the bat,” said Badalich, who founded the anti-rape group 7000 In Solidarity at UCLA. Sexual harassment is one of the hardest things to explain to students, she said — especially certain ideas, like how catcalling is actually harassment.

Badalich added that she hopes “Decisions that Matter” will eventually also incorporate stalking, intimate partner violence and LGBTQ relationships.

If the game doesn’t address those issues, then it “erases the experiences of LGBTQ survivors and male survivors,” said Tracey Vitchers, chair of the nonprofit advocacy group Students Active for Ending Rape.

“Other problematic aspects of ‘Decisions that Matter’ have to do with the positioning of the characters themselves,” Vitchers told The Huffington Post. “[Character] Natalie is positioned as having very little agency, which reinforces negative stereotypes about survivors and/or potential survivors. And Luke, her love interest, is positioned as an unintentional aggressor who simply doesn’t understand that what he is doing is wrong.”

Vitchers said she’s not a fan of most other products on the market, usually in the form of apps, that claim to offer a way for potential victims to stop attacks. While she agrees that bystander intervention can help create a community emphasis on stopping rape, Vitchers said she’s worried colleges will focus too much on these approaches at the expense of discussing consent.

But Klein hopes the game will help reach people who do not think they’re capable of perpetrating this type of violence, as well as people who might intervene in a situation.

“It’s so easy for people to say, ‘Well, I wouldn’t have gone to that place in the first place,’ and that’s so victim-blaming,” Klein said. “You don’t know what you would do unless you’re actually in that situation. [In this game], you’re confronting what you actually might do in that situation.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

“Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands:” The Inspiration Behind the Novel

2015-05-22-1432296362-180571-img_5138.jpg

It’s one of those classic, absolutely reasonable questions–that is, alas, as impossible to answer briefly as the meaning of life. But I am asked it often. All novelists are.

Where do your ideas come from?

The glib answer–always offered with a smile–is this: “Macy’s.”

The reality is that each of my 17 novels sprang from a very different seed and grew in a very different fashion. My most recent novel, “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands,” is a case in point.

Emily Shepard, the 17-year-old Vermonter who narrates the book, was born in Beirut–or, at the very least, she was conceived there. It was December 2012, and I had arrived in the city while on a seven-day speaking tour in Lebanon. My plane landed around 3:30 in the afternoon, which my body clock adamantly told me was really 10:30 at night. I went out to dinner with my hosts from one of the universities, and returned to my hotel around 11 p.m.–at about the time I would be rising if I were back home in Vermont. I had slept on the plane, but not very much. I was exhausted and knew I should go right to bed, since the next day was going to begin with a breakfast meeting.

But I didn’t go to sleep, because I had started reading a novel on the flight and had to finish it. It was riveting. The book? Emma Donoghue’s “Room.” It wasn’t simply the plot that held me fast, as taut as it is; it was the narrator. As a novelist, I was dazzled by the authenticity of the voice Donoghue had created for her five-year-old male storyteller. That’s right, a little boy named Jack shares with us the wrenching, adult story of his and his mother’s imprisonment in a shed, and his mother’s desperate attempt to save them both.

I finished the novel around two in the morning in Beirut, and knew I wanted my next novel to be a first-person tale with a voice that genuine and unexpected. I had no idea, however, who that storyteller would be. An important detail, I know.

Ten days later I was back in my beloved 802. (We have just one area code here in Vermont: 802.) I went to lunch with a friend of mine, Annie Ramniceanu, a therapist who at the time was working with teens in trouble. She told me how a couple of homeless kids–teens who were falling through the system–had built igloos against the Lake Champlain cold out of trash bags filled with wet, frozen leaves, and I knew instantly the novel I wanted to write.

The very idea of a teen girl living alone in one of those igloos broke my heart. That image haunted me–and spurred me on.

And I knew my narrator. I knew Emily Shepard was a cutter and Oxycontin addict, and an aspiring poet with a girl crush on Emily Dickinson. She was a homeless kid and an orphan trying desperately to keep it together after a Fukushima-scale meltdown of Vermont’s lone nuclear plant.

Most of my novels begin very much like this: an inspiration. An anecdote. An unexpected synaptic connection.

Now, “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands” is not the first time I’ve had a female narrator share with my readers a story. “Midwives,” “Trans-Sister Radio,” “Secrets of Eden,” and “The Sandcastle Girls” had female narrators, too.

But, as I will reveal in my post here next week, this was the first time I found myself texting my teenage daughter for hipster-speak synonyms for “hookup” and “stoned.”

Stay tuned.

(The paperback of “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands” arrives this Tuesday, on May 26.)

2015-05-22-1432296442-8126004-coverforcloseyoureyes.jpg

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Miracle in Las Vegas: A Novel by

Miracle in Las Vegas: A Novel by


New – All Richard Stewart, the 29-year-old Omaha businessman, wanted was to find a choice Las Vegas property for a new golf and sporting goods store. During the search, as if fate is dealing the cards, he becomes more than just good friends with five intriguing and very diverse lifestyle individuals. There is the beautiful and talented newswoman, the public relations genius, the sage hotel manager, the brilliant high school counselor, and the former homeless man trying to change his life around

Price: $
Sold by Alibris UK: books, movies

Who Is the Romance Novel Reader?

It is a truth universally acknowledged that romance readers are single women in possession of cats and in want of a man. Other “true” facts about the romance reader: They’re “nice people with bad taste in books”, uneducated, bored, stupid, “lack romance in their lives.” Or if we want to be really specific, they’re “middle aged women who are bored in their marriages and want to fantasize about hard, chiseled men.” Or maybe they’re “younger women who are using them as emotional porn.”***

2015-05-05-1430840575-381096-DangerousBooksForGirlsbig.jpg

The romance industry is big — it’s the second largest category of fiction, outselling science fiction, fantasy and the classics — which means there are a lot of readers, who may or may not fit the stereotype. It means that you or someone you know might be reading romances.

There are many myths about who reads romance novels and why — something I explore in my book Dangerous Books For Girls: The Bad Reputation of Romance Novels Explained — but here’s the truth, based on research, survey data and common freaking sense:

 
 

MYTH: The romance reader is likely to be a desperate housewife, lonely spinster or sorority sister.**
FACT: Contrary to popular perception, women do not make up 150% of romance readers. According to survey results from Romance Writers of America, 84 percent of romance readers are women and 16 percent are men — up from 9 percent a few years ago.

While 70% of romance readers discover the genre between the ages of 11 and 18, most romance readers tend to be older (the average age range is from 30 and 54 years-old.) She’s also likely to be coupled up and has an average income of $ 55,000 per year.

The romance industry is large — more than half of the mass market paperbacks sold in the U.S. are romance — and it’s readership is vast as well. So for every desperate housewife, there’s a happily harried wife and/or mom taking a break with a romance novel. For every lonely spinster, there’s an unapologetic single woman. And for every sorority sister, there’s a proud geek girl who loves romance novels.

 

MYTH: The address of the romance reader: Fly over state, USA
FACT: There is a grain of truth in this one. In the United States, romance readers are most highly represented in the south, followed by the midwest. But romance novels are read all over the world and translated into many different languages.

MYTH: Romance readers are stupid
FACT: There’s a sense that romance novels are stupid books for stupid people. The non-romance readers I surveyed thought romance readers were less likely to have an advance degree than romance readers reported having attained. But the idea that women’s fiction was frivolous and the readers were foolish goes way back to the 18th and 19th centuries, when the novel was gaining popularity and women were gaining literacy. General impressions of women’s intelligence were hardly flattering, probably because no one thought to give girls an education. This is just an old, leftover association that is hardly relevant these days — isn’t stupid to keep perpetuating it?

2015-05-05-1430840995-8423216-smartwomen.jpg

MYTH: Romance readers lack romance in real life.
FACT: “I don’t think people assume that people who read mystery novels are thwarted detectives,”Esi Sogah, a senior editor at Kensington books, told me. “But there’s this idea that people who like romances don’t actually have romance in their lives.” Get some candles, soft music, wine, flowers, chocolate and a hunk of a man immediately. Or just a romance novel. Because someone out there might not have enough romance in their life.

What is enough romance anyway? What if we have candles but no wine? What if there are flowers but someone forgets the chocolate (that’s really bad). What if there is no man? Can it still be romance? What if you are not swept off your feet because that sounds like someone could get hurt, which would lead a night in the ER which I think we can all agree is not romantic (well — unless it’s McDreamy, RIP).

And if someone doesn’t have enough romance, and supplements with a novel, what’s wrong with that? And if someone doesn’t have a relationship that looks like the ones she reads about in romance novels — where she is cherished, pleasured and respected — and that gets her thinking about making some changes, is that so bad?
 
MYTH: Romance readers wear ugly sweaters
FACT: So does Mr. Darcy.
 
2015-05-05-1430839981-7757695-darcy.jpg

MYTH: Romance readers are stay at home mothers and housewives, idling away the hours by reading trashy Fabio books
FACT: Well this is a fraught subject. Raising a family and keeping a house in order is a tough job and someone has to do it. For a long time, housewife and mother were the highest occupations women could aspire to (also, basically the only one). To claim romance readers aren’t full time family caretakers is to suggest that there’s something wrong with that, which is not something I want to do.

In the 1970s, when the bodice ripping boom happened, women were just starting to venture out into the workforce. In the early 1980s, Janice Radway wrote Reading the Romance: Pop Culture and the Patriarchy based on her focus groups with “The Smithton Women” who were a group of avid romance readers and stay at home wives/mothers, and for a long time this was the only official study of romance readers. Given that the popular perception of the genre seems frozen from the 1970s (Don’t even get me started on Fabio), it makes a certain amount of sense that this is one of the stereotypes that might have been grounded in truth, and stuck around, even though attitudes and day-to-day realities have changed.

Most women work at jobs. Many women work now for reasons ranging from because they can to because they have to either because they’re single or because it’s insanely difficult for a middle class family to get by without two salaries nowadays, which hasn’t always been the case.

Whether staying at home, working from home or working in an office, many women turn to romance novels for some entertainment, escape and relaxation at the end of the day.

MYTH: Romance readers are obsessed with wine, chocolate, and Pride & Prejudice.
FACT: You say that like it’s a bad thing.

2015-05-05-1430841025-7398117-heygirl.jpg

 
MYTH: Romance readers can’t distinguish between fact and fiction.
FACT: Along with decrying the genre as unrealistic, this is something we say to lessen the impact of ideas women get from romance novels. “Crazy” ideas like they can be the heroine of their own lives, that they can find fulfilling love, have orgasmic sex, or just be happy. It’s shorthand for saying “lower your expectations honey, your needs are taking a backseat to Law & Order reruns and no I’m not going to put my socks in the hamper. Also, can you get me a beer?” Romance novels show an idealized — but potentially attainable — life of happiness and satisfaction for women and then they can inspire women to make that fiction a reality.

MYTH: Romance readers don’t know good writing
FACT: “Easy reading is damn hard writing,” said none other than esteemed and celebrated author Maya Angelou. When it comes to romance, it often seems like the entire genre has been written off as crap because of a few poorly written books. Even die hard romance fans, in defense of 50 Shades of Grey will say “it was terribly written” or “it really needed editing.”

But romance readers appreciated a well crafted sentence or a lovely and surprising turn of phrase as much as the next reader. And romance authors strive to deliver, some with more success than others.

Romance readers and writers do know good writing — it’s the kind that make you forget you are reading, that transports you to other worlds, make you feel all the feelings, and makes you want to pick up another book and repeat the experience.
 

MYTH: Romance readers are cat ladies
FACT: I think the Internet has proven that everyone is a cat lady.

 

2015-05-05-1430841078-9909489-romancenovelreader1.png

**Sources: Romance Writer’s of America, The Dangerous Books For Girls survey.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Uc Traveling Sprinkler–canceled: A Novel

Uc Traveling Sprinkler–canceled: A Novel


Bestselling author Nicholson Baker reintroduces The Anthologist’s feckless but hopeful hero Paul Chowder, whose struggle to get his life together is reflected in his steadfast desire to write a pop song, or a protest song, or both at once.   Paul Chowder is turning fifty-five and missing his ex-girlfriend, Roz, rather desperately. Putting aside poetry in favor of music, and drawing on his classical bassoon training, Paul turns instead to his new acoustic guitar with one goal in mind: to learn songwriting. As he struggles to come to terms with the horror of America’s drone wars and Roz’s recent relationship with a local NPR radio host, Paul fills his days with Quaker meetings, Planet Fitness workouts, and some experiments with tobacco. Written in Baker’s beautifully unconventional prose, Traveling Sprinkler is an enchanting, hilarious—and very necessary—novel by one of the most beloved and influential writers today.
List Price:
Price:

Trilby; A Novel

Trilby; A Novel


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: vencaux (but not the same butter ). And to wash it all down, generous wine in wooden "brocs"?that stained a lovely aesthetic blue everything it was spilled over. And you hobnobbed with models, male and female, students of law and medicine, painters and sculptors, THE BRIDGE OF ARTS workmen and blanchis- seuses and grisettcs, and found them very good company, and most improving . to your French, if your French was of the usual British kind, and even to some of your manners, if these were very British indeed. And the evening was innocently wound up with billiards, cards, or dominos at the Cafe du Luxembourg opposite; or at the Theatre du Luxembourg, in the Rue de Madame, to see funny farces with screamingly droll Englishmen in them; or, still better, at the Jardin Bullier (la Closerie dcs Lilas), tosee the students dance the cancan, or try and dance it yourself, which is not so easy as it seems; or, best of all, at the Theatre de 1’Odeon, to see some piece of classical repertoire. Or, if it were not only fine, but a Saturday afternoon into the bargain, the Laird would put on a necktie and a few other necessary things, and the three friends would walk arm in arm to Taffy’s hotel in the Rue de Seine, and wait outside till he had made himself as presentable as the Laird, which did not take very long. And then (Little Billee was always presentable) they would, arm in arm, the huge Taffy in the middle, descend the Rue de Seine and cross a bridge to the Cite, and have a look in at the Morgue. Then back again to the quays on the rive gauche by the Pont Neuf, to wend their way westward; now on one side to look at the print and picture shops and the magasins of bric-a-brac, and haply sometimes buy thereof, now on the other to finger and cheapen the second-hand books for sale …
List Price:
Price:

Mortmorley’s Estate. a Novel.

Mortmorley’s Estate. a Novel.


bTitle:/b Mortmorley’s Estate. A novel. br/br/bPublisher:/b British Library, Historical Print Editionsbr/br/The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is one of the world’s largest research libraries holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats: books, journals, newspapers, sound recordings, patents, maps, stamps, prints and much more. Its collections include around 14 million books, along with substantial additional collections of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 300 BC. br/br/The GENERAL HISTORICAL collection includes books from the British Library digitised by Microsoft. This varied collection includes material that gives readers a 19th century view of the world. Topics include health, education, economics, agriculture, environment, technology, culture, politics, labour and industry, mining, penal policy, and social order. br/br/++++br/The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: br/++++br/br/b /b British Librarybr/b /b Riddell, J. H.; br/b /b 1874.br/b /b 3 vol. ; 8

Price: $
Sold by Wordery

The Clives of Burcot. a Novel.

The Clives of Burcot. a Novel.


bTitle:/b The Clives of Burcot. A novel. br/br/bPublisher:/b British Library, Historical Print Editionsbr/br/The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is one of the world’s largest research libraries holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats: books, journals, newspapers, sound recordings, patents, maps, stamps, prints and much more. Its collections include around 14 million books, along with substantial additional collections of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 300 BC. br/br/The GENERAL HISTORICAL collection includes books from the British Library digitised by Microsoft. This varied collection includes material that gives readers a 19th century view of the world. Topics include health, education, economics, agriculture, environment, technology, culture, politics, labour and industry, mining, penal policy, and social order. br/br/++++br/The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: br/++++br/br/b /b British Librarybr/b /b Stretton, Hesba; br/b /b 1867 [1866].br/b /b 3 vol. ; 8

Price: $
Sold by Wordery

El Dorado. a Novel.

El Dorado. a Novel.


bTitle:/b El Dorado. A novel. br/br/bPublisher:/b British Library, Historical Print Editionsbr/br/The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is one of the world’s largest research libraries holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats: books, journals, newspapers, sound recordings, patents, maps, stamps, prints and much more. Its collections include around 14 million books, along with substantial additional collections of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 300 BC. br/br/The GENERAL HISTORICAL collection includes books from the British Library digitised by Microsoft. This varied collection includes material that gives readers a 19th century view of the world. Topics include health, education, economics, agriculture, environment, technology, culture, politics, labour and industry, mining, penal policy, and social order. br/br/++++br/The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: br/++++br/br/b /b British Librarybr/b /b Leigh, Alfred; br/b /b 1880.br/b /b 2 vol. ; 8

Price: $
Sold by Wordery

Bound to the Wheel. [A Novel.]

Bound to the Wheel. [A Novel.]


bTitle:/b Bound to the Wheel. [A novel.]br/br/bPublisher:/b British Library, Historical Print Editionsbr/br/The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is one of the world’s largest research libraries holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats: books, journals, newspapers, sound recordings, patents, maps, stamps, prints and much more. Its collections include around 14 million books, along with substantial additional collections of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 300 BC. br/br/The GENERAL HISTORICAL collection includes books from the British Library digitised by Microsoft. This varied collection includes material that gives readers a 19th century view of the world. Topics include health, education, economics, agriculture, environment, technology, culture, politics, labour and industry, mining, penal policy, and social order. br/br/++++br/The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: br/++++br/br/b /b British Librarybr/b /b Saunders, John; br/b /b 1866.br/b /b 3 vol. ; 8

Price: $
Sold by Wordery

Pond Ball Clintock and the Gods of Golf: A Novel for True Believers

Pond Ball Clintock and the Gods of Golf: A Novel for True Believers


New – Samuel “Pond Ball” Clintock wasn’t born with a silver spoon in his mouth, a Titleist in his fairway, or a Cadillac in his driveway. No, Sammy is coming of age in a shack at the edge of town with a golf-gifted daddy who’s sworn off the game and who hasn’t held a driver’s license, a 9-iron, or a real job in years. Still, Sammy has reason to be happy, what with a legendary golf course in his back yard and pond balls aplenty in his back pocket. There’s one big problem though. Mimosa G.C. hasn’

Price: $
Sold by Alibris UK: books, movies

Gaston Bligh. [A Novel.]

Gaston Bligh. [A Novel.]


bTitle:/b Gaston Bligh. [A novel.]br/br/bPublisher:/b British Library, Historical Print Editionsbr/br/The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is one of the world’s largest research libraries holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats: books, journals, newspapers, sound recordings, patents, maps, stamps, prints and much more. Its collections include around 14 million books, along with substantial additional collections of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 300 BC.br/br/The GENERAL HISTORICAL collection includes books from the British Library digitised by Microsoft. This varied collection includes material that gives readers a 19th century view of the world. Topics include health, education, economics, agriculture, environment, technology, culture, politics, labour and industry, mining, penal policy, and social order. br/br/++++br/The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification:br/++++br/br/b<Source Library>/b British Librarybr/b<Contributors>/b Lavenu, L. S.; br/b<Original Pub Date>/b 1858.br/b<Physical Description>/b 2 vol. ; 8

Price: $
Sold by Wordery

Novel Ebola Vaccine Shows Potential in Monkey Trial

Findings prompted start of first human trial of vaccine last week, officials say
healthfinder.gov Daily News
SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN!-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News-
HEALTH SPECIALS!!-

Save up to 50% at Walgreens

The Lardners And The Laurelwoods – A Novel

The Lardners And The Laurelwoods – A Novel


THE LART NERS AND THE LAURELWOODS A NOVEL B Y Sheila Kaye-Smith 3. J HARPER BROTHERS PUBLISHERS New York and London 1947 9-7 THE LARDNERS AND THE LAURELWOODS Copyright, 1947, by Sheila Kaye-Smth Fry Printed in the United States of America All rights in this book are reserved. It may not be used for dramatic, motion-or talking-picture purposes without written authorization from the holder of these rights. Nor may the book or part thereof be reproduced in my manner whatsoever without permission in writing except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles and reviews. For information address Harper Brothers, 49 East rd Street, New York i6 N. Y. FIRST EDITION GW The Lardners and the Laurelwoods PRELUDE SUCH A RAILWAY, THOUGHT MARTIN, SHOULD NOT BE ALLOWED TO exist in the present stage of our civilization. He had been sitting for nearly an hour on a hard, springless seat, but he had not traveled more than twenty miles and it was impossible to read, because there was no light in the carriage. There had been no light in the old days, he remembered the railway had no tunnels and it had not been thought necessary to provide lamps to dispel merely natural darkness. But surely things might have moved a bit since then. From what he could see of it, this carriage had been in use unchanged for thirty or forty years. He might even have traveled in it on some earlier occasion. They might all have crowded in here, he, Diana, Meg, Father, Mother, Boy and Nanny Wheeler, laughing, chattering, pushing, scuffling, taking up the whole compartment with their parcels and hand luggage. It was a strange thought that in those days the high spot of the journey had been their change from thecomfortable, conventional, punctual South Eastern Railway to the little wooden train with its ridiculous humpbacked engine that jolted and shunted them across the marsh from Flattenden into the Weald. The holiday longed for and planned for throughout so many London weeks seemed really t …

Price: $
Sold by Wordery

Beauty and the Priest, (erotica) An Erotic Novel

Beauty and the Priest, (erotica) An Erotic Novel


A forbidden love that will not be forsaken.a lust that must be fulfilled. Two women, one just a young girl of fifteen, and a priest make for an unusual alliance for sexual intentions, pleasures and even cruelty. Where will their exploits lead – heavenly satisfaction or sexual damnation? A priest fighting temptation samples of the fruits of passion, lust and the flesh. “A man loved me! It was something new to me, something more than my mere sexual relationship with Gregoire. I told him that I did not see anything bad in writing letters, that I would be delighted to meet his request and to answer his letters too. Then he knelt down and started kissing my legs and my hands to thank me. He tried to put his hands under my dress but I stopped him. He looked disappointed. Then he sat on a chair and took me on his lap. He kissed my face so gently; he was so sweet! He was pressing my breasts on his heart and at the same time, I could feel his hand.” What a strange situation for this priest who was fighting against himself. In his heart, his religious duty, his human instincts, his male instincts and his passion for her were warring against one another. He was almost ready to throw himself at the feet of his siren, to save her from the impurity she was living in. The battle was becoming harder and harder to endure. “In class, seeing her, so good, so lovely, so beautiful, so engaging, so tantalizing! Oh! It started by my adoration of her clothes, which showed the shape of her figure so well, of her dresses made of soft fabrics, which called my hands to touch them. Adoring her dresses, I started noticing her manner, so distinguished, so affable, so understanding. It used to throw me into dreams where I would imagine such pleasant pictures. She wore such a subtle perfume that my blood rushed to my head each time she came near me and I would feel a violent temptation to embrace her and devour her with kisses. I became so excited that every part of my body would quiver. Eac

Price: $
Sold by Kobo (UK)

‘Flowers In The Attic’ Review: Lifetime’s Gamble On The V.C. Andrews Novel Falls Flat

Ask any girl in her thirties, and she’ll likely have an inexplicable soft spot for “Flowers in the Attic,” that chilling V.C. Andrews novel passed around like a dirty secret at slumber parties and middle school playgrounds. What “Hunger Games” and “Twilight” are for millennials, the Dollanganger series was for girls who grew up in the ’80s and ’90s; the rags-to-riches story appealed to our fantasy, the brother-sister incest made it verboten. Yes, the incest. A curious hallmark of Andrews’ writing (and the books subsequently published under her name by a ghostwriter and the Andrews estate), brother-sister/ father-daughter/ cousin-cousin love felt every bit as stunningly taboo as young children murdering one another in a corrupt government’s version of the Olympic games. It still is.

Ironically, the premise of four children locked away in a dusty attic for years doesn’t seem as outlandish as it did when I first read the book, at age 12. In recent years, the media has been filled with numerous stories of evil men doing evil things like holding girls, some of them their own daughters, captive in basements for decades. Suddenly, a book featuring captivity, casual incest and generations of abuse in rural Virginia doesn’t seem so improbable. Andrews’ 1979 cult hit rings oddly prescient today.

All of this zeitgeist chatter is to say that Lifetime’s gamble on producing a made-for-TV movie adaptation of “Flowers” felt like a good one (the campy 1987 film adaptation, starring in Louise Fletcher and Kristy Swanson, is generally considered a flop). And a trailer for the movie, starring Kiernan Shipka (“Mad Men”) and Heather Graham, was generally received with excited anticipation when it was released in November.

So now that the movie has premiered on the network on Saturday (Jan. 18), does it live up to expectations? Sadly, the answer is no. The acting is flat and the movie (directed by Deborah Chow), while aesthetically pleasing, keeps on dragging on and on until you wonder why you were so excited to watch it in the first place. Lifetime felt so confident that it had a winner on its hands that it has already green-lit a second movie, an adaption of the book’s sequel, “Petals on the Wind.” Perhaps they should have waited until reviews of the first came out. Below are my reactions to the movie.

flowers
Kiernan Shipka as Cathy
The precocious, 14-year-old Shipka appears to be fearless when it comes to more mature content (though she swears she’s still not allowed to watch “Mad Men” at home). And she looks exactly the part of Cathy Dollanganger, with her perfect doll looks and sad, wise-beyond-her-years demeanor. She’s a bright spot in the movie, but it’s an uphill battle with such little plot and a stiff script by Kayla Alpert. Cathy in the book is a drama queen and a dreamer, the ballerina who fights to survive. Shipka’s Cathy is more languid and lifeless. There is also zero chemistry between her and her older brother and future romantic interest, Chris (played by Mason Dye, an actor with Zac Efron hair and blindingly white teeth).

flowers
Heather Graham and Ellen Burstyn as Corrine and Olivia
It’s not surprising that veteran actresses Graham and Burstyn, as the children’s irresponsible mother and their evil grandmother, deliver the film’s strongest performances. Graham in particular is effective as the beautiful but ultimately evil mother. Her eyes are like wide, blank pools of immaturity; her porcelain but vacant beauty a mask for the kind of selfish mother who would rather see her own children waste away and die than give up trips to Paris and an inheritance. But I was left wanting more from Burstyn (whose performance as the gullible sweepstakes winner in 2000’s “Requiem for a Dream” I’m still haunting by) as the Bible-thumping, religious fanatic Olivia. Her pathetic cries for help at the end of the movie were Burstyn at her best; if the film had fully fleshed out her character’s vulnerability, we would have been left with a more memorable villain.

whipping
The Whippings
Both scenes involving Corrine and Chris getting whipped weren’t nearly scary enough. It’s not just the fact that Corrine’s lashes on her back were so obviously painted on, though that certainly didn’t help. There is a way to convey the kind of generational family abuse without resorting to the physical, and I’m not sure that the whippings were an effective medium to portray the kind of terror felt by the twins and Corrine at the hands of Olivia.

house
Not Enough Foxworth Hall
V.C. Andrews purists will tell you that much of her books’ appeal was the sheer fantasy of it all: Southern mansions and secret gardens, side rooms and libraries. Which is why it’s so disappointing that we don’t get to experience Foxworth Hall’s grandeur as we did in the books. Chow doesn’t allow the viewer to experience much more of the Foxworth family estate than the two floors of the attic. We see the mansion’s facade, we sneak down a set of stairs into their mother’s bedroom, we barely glimpse the library… and that’s about it. We never get a sense of the house’s structure, or for the opulence, the untouchable beauty of it all. Even Chris and Cathy’s escape to the property’s lake felt without view. C’mon, people. This is supposed to be the Foxworths, a family with tons and tons of money (“We’re going to be rich!” Corrine tells the children in the beginning of the movie, when she tells them about her plans). So why does the movie’s budget feel so poor?

cathy
Cathy Becomes A Woman and That Scene
One of the most pivotal scenes in the book is when Chris chops Cathy’s hair after it is mysteriously covered in tar. A moment of tenderness is meant to pass between them and — dear Lord, why is that hair so clearly fake? It sounds like metal shears are hacking into a whole head of straw. Not only was Cathy’s fake wig distracting in the scene, so were the rigid acting and dialogue. I mean, I suppose there’s no good way to convey that inherently creepy moment when a sexual relationships blossoms between a brother and sister (“So… you think of me, then?”), but Chow also failed to capture the sense of longing and girl-becomes-woman emotion of that moment. And while the director thankfully spares us unnecessarily graphic scenes between Cathy and Chris (considering Shipka’s age), she also kinds of just avoids the incest completely. The siblings kiss, then the scene cuts to black and there they are, waking up next to each other on a dirty mattress. And that’s basically that.

flowers
The Twins and Imprisonment in the Attic
Part of what made “Flowers” so haunting is the revelation that twin brother Cory died from being poisoned by donuts laced with arsenic, not pneumonia, prompting Cathy and Chris to escape the attic once and for all. In the book, the twins are stunted in growth, from the lack of sunlight and fresh air. In the movie, the twins Carire and Cory (played by Ava Telek and Maxwell Kovach) don’t play much of a part other than to say they’re hungry. Chow misses an opportunity to make more of an analogy about their well-being and suffering, general malaise and the obtuseness of a selfish mother… Or are we just reading too much into this here?

flowers escape
The Escape Scene
After spending an hour (or four years) with the children in an attic, it was pretty anti-climatic to see that the children could fashion an old-fashioned blanket-rope and casually climb out of their prison/house with ease. And then there’s the LOL moment when a man hunting for deer on the property allows three completely malnourished children claiming to be Corrine’s offspring run away. It’s like Chow was in a rush to finish off the movie; if she couldn’t be bothered introducing more believability into that scene, then it should have been cut from the script.

What did you make of Lifetime’s “Flowers in the Attic” movie? And will you be watching the network’s upcoming sequel, “Petals on the Wind”? Sound off in the comments below.

Follow Youyoung Lee on Twitter: @youyoung_lee.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

Manhattan Toy Wimmer Ferguson Nursery Novel, 1 ea

Manhattan Toy Wimmer Ferguson Nursery Novel, 1 ea


Wimmer Ferguson infant development toys are the original and leader in high contrast graphic products for newborns and infants. Features include classic developmental prints, crinkle paper flaps, a mirror and ribbon ties to close or attach to various play areas. Ages 0 and up.

Price: $
Sold by drugstore.com

The Zealot: A Roman Legion Novel

The Zealot: A Roman Legion Novel


Trouble is brewing on the eastern frontier of the Roman Empire. The troops are in a deplorable state, while the corrupt behavior of their senior officers threatens to undermine the army’s control of the region. To restore the competence of the men defending a vital fort, two experienced centurions are dispatched to Judea. On their arrival Macro and Cato discover that Bannus, a local tribesman, is fomenting rebellion amongst the followers of Jehoshua, who was crucified in Jerusalem some seventeen years earlier. As the local revolt grows, Rome’s longstanding enemy Parthia is poised to invade. Macro and Cato must stamp out corruption in the cohort and restore it to fighting fitness before the Eastern provinces are lost forever. A master of his craft, Simon Scarrow combines stunning historical detail with riveting battles and rich characters to bring the Roman Empire to life as never before.

Price: $
Sold by Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC