Plymouth hospital in ‘pioneering’ deal with private health company

The trust said the deal would reduce waiting times but Labour called it ‘front door privatisation’.
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Thad Mumford, Pioneering African-American Writer for ‘MASH,’ ‘Electric Company,’ Dies at 67

Thaddeus Q. Mumford, a pioneering African-American TV writer-producer who worked on shows ranging from “MASH” to “The Electric Company” to “Blue’s Clues,” has died after a long illness. He was 67. Mumford died Sept. 6 at his father’s home in Silver Spring, Md., according to his sister-in-law, Donna Coleman. With his longtime writing partner Dan […]

Variety

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Pioneering type 1 diabetes therapy safe

One day, the immunotherapy could free patients from daily insulin injections.
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Mary Tyler Moore, ‘Beloved Icon’ and Pioneering Star, Laid to Rest in Connecticut

Mary Tyler Moore, the beloved actress and activist who broke ground with her eponymous television show, was laid to rest at the Oaklawn Cemetery in Fairfield, Connecticut, on Sunday, according to the Connecticut Post.

About 50 of the sitcom icon’s family and friends reportedly gathered for a private ceremony. According to the Post, the cemetery was open to the public Sunday afternoon for fans looking to honor the late star.

The funeral reportedly started around 11 a.m., as mourners first gathered in a small, white chapel before Moore’s body was buried.

Moore died Wednesday at the age of 80, and a source told PEOPLE Moore had been on a ventilator and had been hospitalized with pneumonia due to complications from her diabetes.  

Her longtime rep issued a statement to PEOPLE on the day of her death: “Today, beloved icon, Mary Tyler Moore, passed away at the age of 80 in the company of friends and her loving husband of over 33 years, Dr. S. Robert Levine. A groundbreaking actress, producer, and passionate advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Mary will be remembered as a fearless visionary who turned the world on with her smile.”

Moore was diagnosed with diabetes at 33, and in 2009 told PEOPLE that “I thought I’d have to recline on a chaise the rest of my life.”

“There have been challenges,” she said later. “But I’ve triumphed.”


PEOPLE.com

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Pioneering TV actress Mary Tyler Moore dies at 80

FILE - This June 24, 2009 file photo shows actress Mary Tyler Moore before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on Type 1 Diabetes Research on Capitol Hill in Washington. Moore died Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, at age 80. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)NEW YORK (AP) — Mary Tyler Moore, the star of TV's beloved "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" whose comic realism helped revolutionize the depiction of women on the small screen, died Wednesday. She was 80.



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Billabong Pioneering For Days Poncho Sweater – Women’s

Billabong Pioneering For Days Poncho Sweater – Women’s


Whether you’re camped out near the fire or chilling on the couch, the Pioneering For Days Poncho Sweater is an awesome choice. The Pioneering For Days Poncho Sweater from Billabong features an all over southwest jacquard pattern and is made out of a comfortable cotton blend fabric.
List Price: $ 79.95
Price: $ 79.95

Pioneering Malian photographer dies

Malian photographer Malick Sidibe, whose black and white images of popular culture helped show his country in a new light, dies aged 80.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

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Breaking Ground: Pioneering Women Archaeologists

Breaking Ground: Pioneering Women Archaeologists


At the close of the Victorian era, two generations of intrepid women abandoned Grand Tour travel for the rigors of archaeological expeditions, shining the light of scientific exploration on Old World antiquity. Breaking Ground highlights the remarkable careers of twelve pioneers-a compelling narrative of personal, social, intellectual, and historical achievement. -Claire Lyons, The Getty Museum “Behind these pioneering women lie a wide range of fascinating and inspiring life stories. Though each of their tales is unique, they were all formidable scholars whose important contributions changed the field of archaeology. Kudos to the authors for making their stories and accomplishments known to us all!” -Jodi Magness, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill This book presents twelve fascinating women whose contributions to the development and progress of Old World archaeology-in an area ranging from Italy to Mesopotamia-have been immeasurable. Each essay in this collection examines the life of a pioneer archaeologist in the early days of the discipline, tracing her path from education in the classics to travel and exploration and eventual international recognition in the field of archaeology. The lives of these women may serve as models both for those interested in gender studies and the history of archaeology because in fact, they broke ground both as women and as archaeologists. The interest inherent in these biographies will reach well beyond defined disciplines and subdisciplines, for the life of each of these exciting and accomplished individuals is an adventure story in itself

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Horace Silver Dead: Pioneering Jazz Pianist Dies At 85

Horace Silver, a pianist, composer and band leader with a tireless inventiveness who influenced generations of jazzmen with his distinctive hard bop sound, has died. He was 85.

The Westchester County Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed that Silver died Wednesday in New Rochelle, New York, but had no other information. “Horace Silver was one of the hardest swinging piano players in jazz, both as a section player and a soloist,” said Ramsey Lewis, a pianist influenced by Silver. “Moreover, he was one of the finest human beings that walked the earth.”

And one of the most influential, carving a sizeable wake through the jazz world in a career that seemed special from the start.

The pianist was something of a prodigy and moved to New York at the insistence of Stan Getz in the early 1950s after the famed saxophone player hired a rhythm section that included Silver for a one-off in Hartford, Connecticut. Silver was just 21.

He played with Getz for a while — Getz would record some of his early compositions — and other towering pioneers like Lester Young and Coleman Hawkins. He soon began a series of collaborations and recordings that remain highly influential in jazz a half-century later — starting with his partnership with drummer Art Blakey that led to the seminal hard bop album “Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers” in 1955.

Though he eventually left the Messengers, Silver continued a string of milestone albums for Blue Note, a label he recorded for until 1980, which are still referenced often, including “Six Pieces of Silver” in 1956 and “Blowin’ The Blues Away” in 1959.

Silver’s father was born in Cape Verde and the folk music of that island nation was always part of his influences. An innately funky player with a keen sense of style, he also incorporated the blues and gospel into his compositions, modernizing jazz at the same time those sounds were transforming other genres like rock ‘n’ roll and R&B.

“It’s like making a stew,” Silver said in a 2003 All About Jazz interview. “You put all these various ingredients in it. You season it with this. You put that in it. You put the other in it. You mix it all up and it comes out something neat, something that you created.”

Songs like “The Preacher,” ”Song for My Father” and the evocatively titled “Filthy McNasty” showed the possibilities of jazz when leavened with other sounds, and his experimentation would not end there. He eventually began to include lyrics with his works and explored social and political themes in his music in the 1960s and ’70s, even dabbling in what he described as cosmic philosophy.

“Horace Silver’s music has always represented what jazz musicians preach but don’t necessarily practice, and that’s simplicity,” bassist Christian McBride told NPR in 2008. “It sticks to the memory. It’s very singable. It gets in your blood easily. You can comprehend it easily. It’s very rooted, very soulful.”

Silver, born Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silva in 1928 in Norwalk, Connecticut, moved to Los Angeles later in his career. He was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1995 for his album “Hard Bop Grandpop” and in 2005 the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences gave him its president’s merit award.

His most widely heard composition, however, was not one he recorded himself. The rock group Steely Dan borrowed a riff from “Song for My Father” for their 1974 hit “Rikki, Don’t Lose That Number,” a song that remains in heavy rotation on classic rock and oldies stations.

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AP writer Charles J. Gans in New York contributed to this report.
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