Newsbook: Read These 3 Books About Aretha Franklin and Soul Music

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17 Refreshing Books to Read This Summer

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The best Eagles-Patriots preview you’ll read: Barnwell makes his Super Bowl pick

Brady vs. Foles. Belichick vs. Pederson. McDaniels vs. Schwartz. Ertz vs. a double-team. Gronk vs. … everybody? This Eagles-Patriots matchup is no mismatch. Bill Barnwell covers every angle.
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Read Chelsea Clinton’s Heartfelt Letter to Her Kids About Trump and 2016 Election: ‘Progress Is Possible’ But Not ‘Inevitable’

She may have campaigned for her mother in the 2016 election — but Chelsea Clinton was fighting for her children.

The former first daughter wrote an open letter to daughter Charlotte, 3, and son Aiden, 1, for Teen Vogue in which she explains that creating a better world for her children is what most inspired her to travel the country stumping for mom Hillary Clinton — and warning about the dangers of a President Trump.

“The 2016 Election was most of all about you and the world I wanted for you and your generation to grow up in,” Clinton tells her kids. “While your grandmother’s name was on the ballot, for me, it was an election fundamentally about our country’s future, about your future. I am so proud to have campaigned for her — and fought for you.”

And although she was obviously disappointed by the election’s outcome, Clinton says that her “hopes for futures haven’t changed.”

“Everything that motivated me to work so hard for your futures throughout 2016 is still true today. Arguably more so,” she writes.

“What’s once again clear a couple hundred days into President Trump’s administration is that who is elected to office matters — for what is done, what is undone, and who and what are neglected through malice or incompetence,” Clinton continues. “A core lesson of this time in your early lives is that progress is possible, but it is not inevitable. It must be protected and advanced at the ballot box and beyond.”

RELATED VIDEO: Ivanka Trump and Chelsea Clinton Defend Malia Obama’s Right to Privacy

Clinton had more harsh words for Trump in the letter, describing him as “a president who excuses neo-Nazis, who wants to ban members of our military because of who they are and keep out immigrants because of who they worship; that’s personal regard-less of our religion, our gender, or where we’re from … a president who denies science, whether it’s vaccines or climate change or evidence that, yes, health insurance helps save lives.”

“I foolishly used to believe that the political and the personal could be separated; I no longer believe that,” Clinton writes, later adding: “The marked rise in bullying in our schools, with some kids citing President Trump’s words to taunt others? That’s personal … ”

She concludes, “Protecting children isn’t someone else’s job; it’s all our jobs — even if the president doesn’t think it’s his.”


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At 40, and still struggling to read, Brent Sopel opens up

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I only read it for the articles: Playboy’s literary legacy

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What to Read Before Your North Dakota Fossil Dig

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We Are Not Hysterical: 18 Strong Female Voices You Should Read

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Hear Janet Mock Read A Powerful Passage From Her New Memoir

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Fired Vogue Editor Lucinda Chambers Explains Why She Hasn’t Read Vogue ‘In Years’

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We Are Not Hysterical: 18 Strong Female Voices You Should Read

For every positive attribute a woman may possess ― strength, persistence, decisiveness ― there seems to be a popularly used synonym that casts the same quality in a negative light. Women who lead may be painted as curt, loud or cold ― or, worst of all, hysterical.

To combat this message, the staff at New York City’s Strand Book Store compiled a list of strong female voices who, like Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), refuse to be silenced. 

Writes Strand: “On the heels of yet another female U.S. Senator being told to more or less ‘calm down’ while passionately doing the job she was elected to do, we are again wondering this: why are outspoken women so quickly accused of being hysterical? Being unapologetically loud and standing firm on your values are viewed very differently among genders, and when this perceived ‘hysteria’ halts progress, we have a problem.”

Below are 10 titles by women with strong, clear voices, as selected by Strand Book Store:

Mother of All Questions by Rebecca Solnit

In a tone that is incisive, challenging and more than a little disturbing, Solnit speaks volumes on women who refuse to be silent, the gender binary, and so much more. She is fearless in addressing misogyny, the casualness of rape jokes in contemporary comedy, and the need for men to join the third wave. Reassuring and honest, this essay collection embraces modern day feminism and voices that celebrate it. Looking for more leadership? Check out Solnit’s Men Explain Things to Me, or as we consider it, the bible of “mansplaining.”

I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

When we grow up, we want to be like Malala. With a strength that many will (thankfully) never need to channel, Malala offers forgiveness to the members of the Taliban that shot her in the head at just 15 years old in Pakistan. Her miraculous recovery can only be overshadowed by her determination to voice the need for girls’ education in a world of suppression. Through education, these girls can pursue the lives they dream of and the independence they may only read about. With her own education and determination, Malala is the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts. 

My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor

Another example of strong women in our government, Sonia Sotomayor was the first Hispanic and third woman appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. As many stellar female role models, Sotomayor learned early in life to depend on herself if she wanted to succeed. She was inspired by television characters in her career choice, and her sheer determination ensured that she became a lawyer and earned a degree at Yale Law School. Her memoir inspires us to take further steps to see women in every role of federal government.

A Woman Looking at Men Looking at Women by Siri Hustvedt

A beautiful collection of essays from novelist and feminist Siri Hustvedt, author of The Blazing World and What I Loved. In the first of three sections, Hustvedt investigates how gender biases affect our perception of the world in a most timely fashion. Her feminist perspective is combined with elegant writing as she draws connections between the oft incompatible humanities and the sciences.

Plenty Ladylike by Claire McCaskill

A wonderful story that is pro-feminine ambition, Plenty Ladylike explores the life of a woman who has faced it all. Paying her way through law school as a waitress (a trying job on its own), McCaskill has faced and overcome opposition her entire career. When seeking support on her way to the Missouri House of Representatives, voters would suggest she just go get married instead. Once she was elected, secret meetings were held by fellow politicians to block her efforts. When given every opportunity to give up, she refused, and that persistence definitely makes us a fan.

No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need by Naomi Klein

The title alone reminds us that now is not a time to be timid and quiet. Klein’s new release offers real action and strategy for countering the surreal world of politics currently dominating the U.S. She also draws a strong correlation for readers between shock politics and climate change based on two decades of extensive research. A great read on in-depth information of the current administration and how to continue the resistance.

Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud: The Rise and Reign of The Unruly Woman by Anne Helen Petersen

Turn brazen into a compliment with this soon-to-be-released fireball by Buzzfeed culture writer Anne Helen Petersen. Inside, she examines pop icons who are known for their unruly attitudes (think Lena Dunham or Nicki Minaj) and tops us off with a no-nonsense analysis of why this has become a make it or break it point for today’s celebrities. Plus, you can meet Anne Helen Petersen in person at Strand for the book’s release on June 20th.

Hunger: A Memoir of [My] Body by Roxane Gay

Freshly released and on the coattails of her heartbreaking collection of short stories, Difficult Women, Roxane Gay has captured us again with the new memoir, Hunger. In it, with bravery and honesty that is raw as it is resilient, Gay catalogs a lifetime with being at odds with her own body. In a society where being bigger can actually make you invisible, this book provides a voice to an underrepresented population of women here and around the world.

Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity by Julia Serano

As an activist, professional biologist, and transsexual woman, Julia Serano provides a unique perspective on gender, tying together the social and science perspectives in one well-crafted book. She hits hard on the theme of femininity, emphasizing our predisposition to equate it with weakness and passiveness, and she explores where this theme stems from. She encourages feminist and transgender activists to reclaim “being feminine,” turning it into an empowering term for all.

Sex Object: A Memoir by Jessica Valenti

A New York Times bestseller, Sex Object is praised as “an antidote to the fun and flirty feminism of selfies and self-help” by New Republic. Valenti is unabashed in nailing down the ways that sexism affects all areas of our lives. Using the her young adult life in NYC as a foundation, the personal becomes political in a memoir that is less about storytelling and more about a society that still puts women in second place.

Additional Voices:

Dear Ijeawele, Or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie | Adichie speaks on Feminism with Strand

Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes by Anne Elizabeth Moore

Shrill by Lindy West | Lindy West on Shrill at Strand

Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture by Ariel Levy

Bad Girls Throughout History: 100 Remarkable Women Who Changed the World by Ann Shen

Women Who Don’t Wait in Line: Break the Mold, Lead the Way by Reshma Saujiani

Double Bind: Women on Ambition edited by Robin Romm | Watch Strand’s Double Bind Panel

Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir

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8 Things Every Broadway Fan Should Watch, Read Or See Before The Tonys

Still deciding whether to forego rent this month and see Bette Midler in “Hello, Dolly!”? Is your obsession with Ben Platt starting to verge on unhealthy? Were you put on this earth to see Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon swap roles every night in “The Little Foxes”?

Well, fear not, theater fans, because the Tony Awards are upon us, with host Kevin Spacey leading the festivities this year on CBS. The stars of stage and screen (alert: Cate Blanchett will be in attendance) will gather in New York City on Sunday night to celebrate the stellar year in theater.

This Broadway season took us everywhere, from working-class Pennsylvania in Lynn Nottage’s Pulitzer-Prize-winning play “Sweat” to inside the hearts of a fractured family facing the HIV/AIDS crisis in “Falsettos.” Also, though he may not be nominated, but now is a good time as ever to thank the theater gods for casting Jake Gyllenhaal in “Sunday in the Park with George.”

So whether you’re a diehard fan or just tuning into this whole Broadway thing, it’s time to do your homework and check out some theater #content from around the internet about the shows nominated this year. 

And for those “Hamilton” fanatics, yes, the Tonys still happen when the musical isn’t nominated, but, rest assured, Lin-Manuel Miranda will be there.  

 

“Dear Evan Hansen” (Best Musical)

From the minds of “La La Land” songwriters Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, “Dear Evan Hansen” has won over audiences (and Hollywood) thanks to a career-defining performance from Ben Platt and catchy ballads that tug at the heartstrings. Watch Platt and co-star Laura Dreyfuss’ performance on “Late Night with Seth Meyers” below. 

“Sweat” (Best Play)

The early favorite to pick up the award for Best Play this Sunday, Pulitzer winner “Sweat” is the most politIcally relevant of the bunch, exploring the lives of factory workers in a small Pennsylvanian city. HuffPost recently interviewed playwright Lynn Nottage about what the play says about Trump’s America.

Nottage is also working on a companion piece titled “Floyd,” which will … twist … be a comedy. 

“The Little Foxes” (Best Revival of a Play)

Laura Linney. Cynthia Nixon. Period piece. Need we say more? Set in a small town in Alabama circa 1900, both deliver tour de force performances and then switch roles on the subsequent night. They’re also close friends offstage, and brought the fun to “Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen” earlier this year.

“Falsettos” (Best Revival of a Musical)

We cried and then we cried some more. This musical revival about an imperfect family struggling to stay together in the wake of a divorce and a father’s coming out was a standout this season. The cast is slated to perform at the Tonys this Sunday, so read this comprehensive piece from BuzzFeed about why the show means so much to the LGBT community and how it’s more timely than ever. 

“Hello, Dolly!” (Best Revival of a Musical)

As turn-of-the-century matchmaker Dolly Gallagher Levi, Bette Midler has been earning rave reviews for her long-awaited musical comeback to Broadway. The glorious cast album was recently released and, trust us, your ears will immediately thank you for this musical theater goodness.

Also, the movie adaptation starring Barbra Streisand is currently streaming on Netflix, so what’s the holdup?  

“Jitney” (Best Revival of a Play)

From the mind of August Wilson, “Jitney” follows a group of drivers of unofficial and unlicensed taxi drivers ― called “jitneys” ―who transport residents of Pittsburgh Hill District in the 1970s because others refuse to do so. If you haven’t seen Wilson’s best known play “Fences,” the powerful film adaptation starring Viola Davis and Denzel Washington was released last year and also explores the experience and struggle of working class black Americans. 

“Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812” (Best Musical)

This interactive musical needs to be seen to be believed and it’s far too complicated to explain (seriously, it’s adapted from a section of War & Peace), so check out the cast, including Josh Groban, performing two songs on the “Today Show.”

“The Present” (Cate Blanchett for Best Actress)

No one plays morally complex women like Cate Blanchett, and the Oscar winner is in fine form in this surprisingly modern adaptation of an unfinished Chekhov play. Directed by the actress’ husband Andrew Upton, the standout scene features a drunk Blanchett pouring vodka all over herself, as she dances on a dinner table. Watch his interview with the cast below, and for more vodka and Blanchett, check out “Blue Jasmine.” 

The Tony Awards air at 8 p.m. June 11 on CBS.

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Your Next Summer Read Is A Novel About Lonely People Grasping For Connections

It should feel like too much to smash together a book about undiagnosable illnesses and New Age alternative remedies with a book about a New Age relationship experiment run by a narcissistic celebrity with a book about the dehumanizing gig economy with a book about growing up under Voluntaryist religious fundamentalism. The genius of Catherine Lacey lies in the fact that her new book, The Answers, doesn’t feel like too much; the pieces are bizarre and timely and fit together like puzzle pieces into a somehow timeless examination of humanity.

Lacey’s heroine has been backed into a corner. Raised by fundamentalist Christians in a rural home, she had no official documents or real contact with the outside culture until she left home as a teenager and moved in with an aunt, who renamed her from “Junia” to “Mary.” Now in New York, she’s drifted out of touch with her family. She has one dear friend, who has left on a mysterious quest of self-fulfillment. She has a job at a travel agency that barely keeps the lights on. And she has a mysterious, debilitating illness with no diagnosis. She sees doctors and specialists as her symptoms shift and worsen, but no one can put a finger on the root cause. Finally, she’s found a treatment that works ― PAKing, an alternative therapy that seems similar to reiki ― but that demands significant out-of-pocket expenditures.

So she decides, like so many young people crushed by debt and lack of opportunity today, to find a side hustle.

In another novel, that side hustle might have been driving for a ride-share or nannying the children of New York’s elite. In Lacey’s universe, nothing is so obvious. Mary responds to a mysterious help-wanted ad, then finds herself auditioning for a lavishly paid gig as, it turns out, the Emotional Girlfriend to movie star Kurt Sky. She’s both a guinea pig in an experiment to better understand the ideal relationship and an emotional laborer hired to keep the self-involved Kurt satisfied romantically. Scientists behind the scenes may be pulling the levers, but he’s providing the funding and reaping the immediate benefits of having carefully cast girlfriends to provide him with emotional support; for sex, for silent companionship, for arguing and for intellectual conversation.

This setup, dazzling and yet sinister as it may be, has little excitement for Mary. Being deprived of intimacy after her one relationship fell apart and her one friend disappeared on her seems to make her less particular about who she gives her time to ― besides, she needs the money. But she doesn’t much enjoy listening to Kurt’s emotional turmoil and responding in the directed fashion. He, on the other hand, finds himself fascinated by her quiet, submissive demeanor and her ability to listen with apparent interest for hours. (Naturally the Intellectual Girlfriend, with her frequently expressed opinions and education, soon wearies him.) He demands more and more of her time; soon, the experiment has transformed from a weird side gig to an all-consuming lifestyle that demands her to alienate herself from her own emotional needs to be what her boss asks. Still desperate to finish her PAK therapy, she clings to the unsettling but well-paying job.

As the novel progresses, we move in and out of Mary’s perspective to hear from Kurt, who muses on his failed past relationships and the movie he’s been trying to perfect in edits for 10 years; his obsessively devoted personal assistant, Matheson, who resents Kurt’s increasing dependence on Mary; and other women who participate in the project, particularly Ashley. A boxer with a burning grudge, she agrees to be Kurt’s Anger Girlfriend, only to find herself drawn back into a youthful trauma that threatens to blow up the whole experiment.

Lacey’s prose radiates elegance beneath its unassuming, unflashy surface; there’s nary a maladroit word or an unrevealing detail. She skillfully balances a truly absurd array of hot-button topics and weird narrative twists, playing them off each other virtuosically to weave a surreal-feeling story with deeply pragmatic concerns: How do we come to know ourselves? How do we become part of our community? What should we sacrifice to give a partner what they need? What should we demand from each other? Can a relationship be satisfying to us without dehumanizing our partner? How do we reconcile our personal fulfillment with the increasingly all-encompassing demands of simply staying alive in this economy? What are the limits of technology and science to provide us with happiness?

The Answers offers no answers, of course. Instead, in its stark portraits of bewildered, alienated people, it lays bare the unresolvable paradoxes of need that we all hold in our hearts.

The Bottom Line:

Lacey searches for the unanswerable human questions that drive us in her novel of lonely, lost New Yorkers grasping for connection in alienated modern society.

What other reviewers think:

NYT: “This is a novel of intellect and amplitude that deepens as it moves forward, until you feel prickling awe at how much mental territory unfolds.”

Kirkus: “With otherworldly precision and subtle wit, Lacey creates a gently surreal dreamscape that’s both intoxicating and profound.”

Who wrote it?

Catherine Lacey has written one previous novel, Nobody Is Ever Missing. She has won a Whiting Award and was selected as one of Granta’s Best Young American Writers.

Who will read it?

Fans of fiction that blends the surreal with realism, such as Murakami.

Opening lines:

“I’d run out of options. That’s how these things usually happen, how a person ends up placing all her last hopes on a stranger, hoping that whatever that stranger might do to her would be the thing she needed done to her.

For so long I had been a person who needed other people to do things to me, and for so long no one had done the right thing to me, but already I’m getting ahead of myself. That’s one of my problems, I’m told, getting ahead of myself, so I’ve been trying to find a way to get behind myself, to be slow and quiet with myself like Ed used to be. But of course I can’t quite make it work, can’t be exactly who Ed was to me.”

Notable passage:

“I looked at his face in the pale dawn, sleeping or just still, and I let myself completely feel the pain of missing a person who no longer exists. Not missing a person who has died, not mourning (I had yet to feel actual grief), but the strain of trying to see the person I’d fallen in love with inside the person he had become. Now I know this just comes with love, that there’s no way to avoid seeing a person gradually erased or warped by time, but the first time I realized this with Paul ― it felt apocryphal.”

The Answers
By Catherine Lacey
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $ 26.00
Published June 6, 2017

Buy on Amazon or your local indie bookstore

The Bottom Line is a weekly review combining plot description and analysis with fun tidbits about the book.

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Former Bachelorette Trista Sutter Hospitalized After Seizure: Read Her Emotional Message About the Terrifying Experience

Trista Sutter, Instagram, HospitalFormer Bachelorette Trista Sutter was hospitalized in a Croatia this week after suffering a seizure during her family’s trip to Europe.
The 44-year-old, who is still married to…

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Bill Gates Wants You To Read Trevor Noah’s Memoir This Summer

Deepen your mind while you deepen your tan.

Microsoft founder, philanthropist and avid bookworm Bill Gates has a few book recommendations for the summer. Each of the titles, which he listed in a blog post on Monday, are meant to help readers better understand the larger world around them.

“Some of these books helped me better understand what it’s like to grow up outside the mainstream,” Gates wrote. “As a child of mixed race in apartheid South Africa, as a young man trying to escape his impoverished life in rural Appalachia, or as the son of a peanut farmer in Plains, Georgia.” 

He adds, “I hope you’ll find that others make you think deeper about what it means to truly connect with other people and to have purpose in your life. And all of them will transport you somewhere else — whether you’re sitting on a beach towel or on your own couch.”

One book Gates recommends is Born a Crime, by Trevor Noah of “The Daily Show,” which details the comedian’s life growing up in apartheid South Africa.

“I loved reading this memoir about how [the] host honed his outsider approach to comedy over a lifetime of never quite fitting in,” Gates wrote.

To find out Gates four other picks, just watch the video above. Happy reading!

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Naomi Watts Had To Go To David Lynch’s House To Read Her ‘Twin Peaks’ Scripts

With the “Twin Peaks” countdown nearing its final hours, we still know almost nothing about what the revival of the eccentric ‘90s classic will entail. Neither does Naomi Watts, and she’s in the damn thing.

One of the many “Twin Peaks” rookies who will appear in the 18-episode limited series premiering Sunday on Showtime, Watts wasn’t sent a single script. She had to venture to co-creator David Lynch’s Los Angeles home to read her scenes. Even that was cagey: “If there were five or six lines said before I started speaking, they were crossed out ― blacked out completely,” Watts said Thursday during an interview for next month’s “The Book of Henry.” 

Since she was cast more than a year ago, Watts has had a “difficult” time safeguarding whatever secrets she does know. This was “next-level” confidentiality, but Watts was happy to “protect” Lynch’s “level of privacy.” It’s not her first Lynchian rodeo, after all ― Watts’ breakout moment was the director’s neo-noir psychodrama “Mulholland Drive.” 

The size of Watts’ role is unclear, especially considering how many other A-listers are joining the new season (Laura Dern, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Jim Belushi, Michael Cera, Amanda Seyfried, Tim Roth, Ashley Judd, Ernie Hudson). Because Showtime did not release screeners for journalists and critics, all we know is that “Twin Peaks: The Return” picks up 25 years after the original series’ culmination, with Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle McLachlan) and other fixtures returning to deepen (and perhaps clarify?) the lingering mysteries surrounding Laura Palmer’s murder.  

Shooting in small-town Washington and parts of Southern California ― “strange places,” in Watts’ words ― helped avoid paparazzi shots that sometimes leak spoilers from film and television sets. “And it’s part of the fun,” Watts said. “The not knowing makes it fun. And you trust David because he is who he is. He’s unique. You give yourself over. He’s done it so brilliantly time and time again, and you just enjoy his little magical world that he’s creating.”

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Read This Before You Start Fasting for Weight Loss

You have other options.

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There’s A Japanese Word For People Who Buy More Books Than They Can Actually Read

Book hoarding is a well-documented habit.

In fact, most literary types are pretty proud of the practice, steadfast in their desire to stuff shelves to maximum capacity. They’re not looking to stop hoarding, because parting with pieces of carefully curated piles is hard and stopping yourself from buying the next Strand staff pick is even harder. So, sorry Marie Kondo, but the books are staying.

The desire to buy more books than you can physically read in one human lifetime is actually so universal, there’s a specific word for it: tsundoku. Defined as the stockpiling of books that will never be consumed, the term is a Japanese portmanteau of sorts, combining the words “tsunde” (meaning “to stack things”) and “oku” (meaning “to leave for a while”). 

We were reminded of the term this week, when Apartment Therapy published a primer for those looking to complete book-hoarder rehab. Several blogs have written on the topic before, though, surfacing new and interesting details about the word so perfect for book nerds everywhere.

While most who’ve written on the topic of tsundoku use the word to describe the condition of book hoarding itself, The LA Times used the term as a noun that describes the person suffering from book stockpiling syndrome, or “a person who buys books and doesn’t read them, and then lets them pile up on the floor, on shelves, and assorted pieces of furniture.”

Tsundoku has no direct synonym in English, Oxford Dictionaries clarified in a blog post, defining the word as “the act of leaving a book unread after buying it, typically piling it up together with other such unread books.” An informative subreddit provides even more context, explaining that “the tsundoku scale” ranges from just one unread book to a serious hoard. “Everyone is most likely to be ‘tsundokursed’ one way or the other,” it warns.

According to Quartz, tsundoku has quite a history. It originated as a play on words in the late 19th century, during what is considered the Meiji Era in Japan. At first, the “oku” in “tsunde oku” morphed into “doku,” meaning “to read,” but since “tsunde doku” is a bit of a mouthful, the phrase eventually condensed into “tsundoku.” And a word for reading addicts was born.

Speaking of addictions ― the term “bibliomania” emerged in England around the same time as “tsundoku.” Thomas Frognall Dibdin, an English cleric and bibliographer, wrote Bibliomania, or Book Madness: A Bibliographical Romance in the 1800s, outlining a fictional “neurosis” that prompted those suffering from it to obsessively collect books of all sorts. 

Bibliomania has a dark past, documented more as a pseudo-illness that inspired real fear than a harmless knack for acquiring books we won’t have time to read. “Some collectors spent their entire fortunes to build their personal libraries,” Lauren Young wrote for Atlas Obscura. “While it was never medically classified, people in the 1800s truly feared bibliomania.”  

Tsundoku seems to better capture the lighter side of compulsive book shopping, a word that evokes images of precariously stacked tomes one good breeze away from toppling over. While there’s no English equivalent quite as beautiful, no one’s stopping you from incorporating the Japanese word into your regular vocabulary.

“As with other Japanese words like karaoke, tsunami, and otaku, I think it’s high time that tsundoku enter the English language,” Open Culture wrote in 2014. “Now if only we can figure out a word to describe unread ebooks that languish on your Kindle. E-tsundoku? Tsunkindle?”

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All-Female ‘Juno’ Cast Will Reunite For Live Read To Benefit Planned Parenthood

Crack open a liter of Sunny D and pick up your hamburger phone to call the “Juno” fan in your life because the film’s cast is reuniting to celebrate its 10th anniversary with a twist. 

Director Jason Reitman is organizing a live read of the script featuring only the female members of the cast, including Ellen Page and Jennifer Garner, to raise funds for Planned Parenthood.

For years, Reitman staged Live Reads for a variety of classic scripts using some of his favorite actors to bring films like “The Princess Bride” and “Stand By Me” to life. After 40 live reads over five years, he bid farewell to the series in 2016. 

However, in the wake of the last year’s presidential election, Reitman says he was inspired to put together an all-female performance of “Juno” to benefit and raise awareness for the women’s health organization.

One of President Donald Trump’s first executive orders signed since his inauguration in January targeted women’s reproductive health access worldwide by halting funding to international nongovernmental women’s health organizations if they provide abortions.

“Like many other people, I felt like I wanted to do something. I wanted to find a way to contribute to the causes that have never felt more important,” he told Entertainment Weekly. “It occurred to me that I have this show that could be used as a tool to not only raise money for causes that need the help, but could serve as an opportunity for a group like Planned Parenthood to connect with an audience who can be presented with new ideas, or even an action item.”

“If there was any confusion about whether ‘Juno’ was pro-choice or pro-life, this should settle that,” Reitman added. “Juno had a choice, and that was the most important part.”

The one-night-only event will take place at the Ace Theater in Los Angeles on April 8. Tickets are already on sale, but the full cast won’t be announced until the final days leading up to the show. 

Proceeds from ticket sales as well as “Juno” memorabilia, including signed original artwork and other goodies from the set, will all go to support Planned Parenthood. 

“Considering how much this election has done against women and what Planned Parenthood has done for women,” Reitman said, “I thought it would be cool to hear this script with an all-female voice.”

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Read a New Black Sails Comic Book Story

As Black Sails’ final season debuts this coming weekend, fans also have the chance to see a new story that takes place much earlier in the show’s timeline via the comic book one-shot Rackham’s Razor.

Black Sails cast member Toby Schmitz, who plays Jack Rackham — teamed with artist Matthew Southworth (Stumptown, Spider-Man: The Grim Hunt] — wrote the story himself, which depicts exactly how Jack and Anne Bonny (Clara Paget) first met and forged their strong bond. IGN has the exclusive debut of the entire comic, which you can view by clicking on the slideshow below. Then come back to this page for info from Schmitz on how Rackham’s Razor came to be.

Oh, and here’s your NSFW language warning for the comic, since the characters speak as you’d expect them to, given this is the world of Black Sails….

Continue reading…

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Carrie Fisher Wanted Her ‘Fantastic Obit’ To Read Something Like This

Many touching obituaries have been written in the wake of Carrie Fisher’s death on Tuesday.

Yet, none are quite like the one the witty 60-year-old author once wrote for herself.

In Fisher’s 2008 memoir Wishful Drinking, which she also adapted into a one-woman show, the actress describes an exchange she had with “Star Wars” creator George Lucas about her iconic Princess Leia costume. She writes:

“George comes up to me the first day of filming and he takes one look at the dress and says, ‘You can’t wear a bra under that dress.’ So I say, ‘Okay, I’ll bite. Why?’ And he says, ‘Because … there’s no underwear in space.’ I promise you this is true, and he says it with such conviction too! Like he had been to space and looked around and he didn’t see any bras or panties or briefs anywhere.”

Lucas, who deemed gold bikinis A-OK in outer space, later explained to Fisher the logic behind his no-bras-in-other-galaxies rule, which she also describes in the book:

“What happens is you go to space and you become weightless. So far so good, right? But then your body expands??? But your bra doesn’t — so you get strangled by your own bra.”

She then reveals how she would like her “fantastic obit” to read:

“Now I think that this would make for a fantastic obit — so I tell my younger friends that no matter how I go, I want it reported that I drowned in moonlight, strangled by my own bra.

And Fisher fans on Twitter certainly obeyed: 

And, at The Huffington Post, we’re honoring that too, Carrie. Rest in peace.

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The Invaluable Lessons Of ‘Watership Down,’ A Dark Classic Every Kid Should Read

“I do not believe in talking down to children,” Richard Adams explained in an interview with The Guardian last year.

This, coming from an author widely known for writing the most violent “talking rabbit book” in history, is an understatement. Watership Down, his 1972 adventure novel, is not only what happens when a writer refuses to talk down to children. It’s what happens when a writer refuses on all counts to shelter kids from the brutal, melancholy realities of our nonfictional world. It’s what happens when a writer decides to give his young readers an obvious, but invaluable lesson: loss, obstacles and chaos, whether we choose them or not, are part of life.

Adams, who died on Tuesday at the age of 96, has recounted the birth of Watership Down many times. In the late 1960s, he ― then a civil servant in the U.K. who’d never written fiction in his life ― would entertain his two daughters on the way to school by telling them stories that revolved around a particularly troubled warren of rabbits. “Once there were two rabbits called Hazel and Fiver,” he’d begin, telling tales captivating in their darkness, involving poison, snares and attack dogs.

Eventually, encouraged by his daughters, Adams put pen to paper and submitted a surprisingly vicious and rabbit-filled manuscript to publishers. Rejected seven times (”They felt the language was too grown up,” Adams explained in a Reddit AMA, “yet the older children wouldn’t like it because it was about rabbits!”), it was finally accepted by Rex Collings, the tiny and summarily lucky publishing house that would go on to see the book sell in the millions.

Hazel and Fiver are names that pique the ears of those who’ve navigated through Adams’ award-winning, 400-plus-page book. Brothers, they lived in a bucolic landscape meant to mimic the Berkshire Downs of Adams’ childhood. Spurred on by an apocalyptic vision Fiver has, they, along with a small group of other rabbits, decide to leave their vulnerable home in search of a new one. The Odyssean journey is neither smooth nor assuring. The distinct characters, so carefully anthropomorphized, are never blindly valiant as a result.

A particularly jarring passage of Watership Down describes the pure fear and anxiety Fiver experiences after involuntarily parting ways with his brother Hazel halfway through the book.

In the burrow, Fiver slept and woke uneasily through the heat of the day, fidgeting and scratching as the last traces of moisture dried out of the earth above him. Once, when a trickle of powdery soil fell from the roof, he leaped out of sleep and was in the mouth of the run before he came to himself and returned to where he had been lying. Each time he woke, he remembered the loss of Hazel and suffered once more the knowledge that had pierced him as the shadowy, limping rabbit disappeared in the first light of morning on the down.

Because of its subject matter (talking rabbits), and perhaps the fact that many first encounter Adams on a high school reading list, some fans might classify Watership Down as a children’s book. Adams shrugs off the label entirely. “I don’t believe there should be such a thing as a children’s book,” he explained during a Reddit AMA. “A book is a book is a book,” he supposes in other interviews. 

In 1974, New York Times critic Richard Gilman directly questioned the intended audience of Adams’ book, claiming, “I can’t imagine many readers under 13 or 14, an age when the lines between juvenile and adult fiction begin to blur, having the patience and grasp of extended allegorical strategies to persevere to the end of a 426‐page epic about a community of rabbits.”

Gilman’s lack of faith in the reading comprehension of teenagers aside, his criticism missed the point. Kids on the precipice of adulthood should be encouraged to read books like Watership Down whether they have the patience for it or not. Humanity wrought through the eyes of bunnies is exactly the kind of fantasy readers under 13 or 14 should be exposed to. The kind of twisted, alien plot that sits in our heads for decades, becoming brighter and more poignant as you age and better empathize with moments like Fiver’s. The kind of book that unravels slowly, painfully, to reveal a story so realistic it’s easy to forget you’re dealing with talking rabbits and make-believe.

“Readers like to be upset, excited and bowled over,” Adams continued in his 2015 interview with The Guardian, remembering his early literary preferences. “I can remember weeping when I was little at upsetting things that were read to me, but fortunately my mother and father were wise enough to keep going.”

Of course, not all mothers and fathers are. Many want to shade their kids from the harsh realities of life, a natural instinct hardly worth criticizing here. Some children come face to face with loss regardless ― be it physical, financial, psychological. They are forced to understand grief and resentment firsthand. They are forced to understand that hard work and persistence and focused belief don’t always yield epic outcomes. But others, nestled safely, are not.

Fiction, thankfully, can give us the gift of empathy. The kind of empathy your protective parents might not be able to impart. Adams, though a parent himself, aware of the fear his stories instilled in his own daughters, remains cooly detached from Watership Down readers. Through his writing, he’s not attempting to provide solace or security. He’s attempting to forge stories that, like the kind he read in his youth (by Edgar Allan Poe, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Algernon Blackwood), made him feel sad and frightened. That familiarized him with the cold, cloying feeling of worry.

Why? Well, Adams, so unaware that he was crafting a classic when he first started sharing stories of Hazel and Fiver, answers the question early on in his book.

To come to the end of a time of anxiety and fear! To feel the cloud that hung over us lift and disperse ― that cloud that dulled the heart and made happiness no more than a memory! This at least is one joy that must have been known by almost every living creature. 

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Cancer Survivor Collects Christmas Cards for Friend with Inoperable Tumors: ‘She Loves to Read Them’


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All 16 Bookends columnists share their favorite reading experiences of 2016.
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The Need to Read

Reading books remains one of the best ways to engage with the world, become a better person and understand life’s questions, big and small.
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What to Read When: The Books and Stories to Read with Your Child–and All the Best Times to Read Them

What to Read When: The Books and Stories to Read with Your Child–and All the Best Times to Read Them


Read Pam Allyn’s posts on the Penguin Blog The books to read aloud to children at the important moments in their lives. In What to Read When, award-winning educator Pam Allyn celebrates the power of reading aloud with children. In many ways, books provide the first opportunity for children to begin to reflectively engage with and understand the world around them. Not only can parents entertain their child and convey the beauty of language through books, they can also share their values and create lasting connections. Here, Allyn offers parents and caregivers essential advice on choosing appropriate titles for their children-taking into account a child’s age, attention ability, gender, and interests- along with techniques for reading aloud effectively. But what sets this book apart is the extraordinary, annotated list of more than three hundred titles suitable for the pivotal moments in a child’s life. With category themes ranging from friendship and journeys to thankfulness, separations, silliness, and spirituality, What to Read When is a one-of-a-kind guide to how parents can best inspire children through reading together. In addition, Pam Allyn includes an indispensable ‘Reader’s Ladder’ section, with recommendations for children at every stage from birth to age ten. With the author’s warm and engaging voice throughout, discussion questions to encourage in-depth conversations, as well as adv
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You Read To Me, I'll Read To You: Very Short Scary Tales To Read Together

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�Qui�n vive aqu�? (Who Lives Here?) Learn to Read, Science en Espa�ol (Learn to Read, Read to Learn: Science) (Spanish Edition)

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Teach Science Standards through Engaging Text Repetitive, predictable story lines and illustrations that match the text provide maximum support to the emergent reader. Engaging stories promote reading comprehension, and easy and fun activities on the inside back covers extend learning. Great for Reading First, Fluency, Vocabulary, Text Comprehension, and ESL/ELL!
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Teach Science Standards through Engaging Text Repetitive, predictable story lines and illustrations that match the text provide maximum support to the emergent reader. Engaging stories promote reading comprehension, and easy and fun activities on the inside back covers extend learning. Great for Reading First, Fluency, Vocabulary, Text Comprehension, and ESL/ELL!
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21 Perfect #ManlyBookClubNames For Bros Who Only Wanna Read About Bros

Men who feel forced to slog through the occasional novel written by or — god forbid! — about a woman, never fear: The Man Book Club is here. 

A Tuesday New York Times profile of said Man Book Club — a 9-year running club made up of men in their 50s, “a number of whom are lawyers and engineers” — and other all-male reading groups made it clear that the men who participate in these groups feel an added need to assert the masculine nature of the groups. (One of the other book clubs highlighted is named the International Ultra Manly Book Club. Because… of course it is.)

“We do not read so-called chick lit,” the Man Book Club founder Andrew McCullough told the NYTimes. “The main character cannot be a woman.” The point is driven home on the group’s website, which reads: “No books by women about women (our cardinal rule).”

The International Ultra Manly Book Club’s website even outlines a vision that “one day we could step out of the shadow of our mothers’ book clubs and proclaim that yes, we too, are intellectuals.”

(Faux) shocked by this apparently new phenomenon of men reading, Fast Company asked people to chime in with their own #ManlyBookClubNames.


Unsurprisingly, the suggestions are pretty brilliant. Below are 21 book club names for any men craving the safe space of other men to talk about books written by men about men for yet other men:

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The Health of Schools: Papers Read Before the American Social Science Association

The Health of Schools: Papers Read Before the American Social Science Association


This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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5 Books You Must Read to Truly Get This Season of Penny Dreadful

5 Books You Must Read to Truly Get This Season of Penny Dreadful

In addition to being a supernatural gothic romance, Showtime’s drama is also catnip for bookworms. These are the novels you should read to know everything. The post 5 Books You Must Read to Truly Get This Season of Penny Dreadful appeared first on WIRED.
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William Gibson’s First Comic, and 4 Others to Read This May

William Gibson’s First Comic, and 4 Others to Read This May

It’s a great month to start reading comics again, and these five new titles are just a part of why. The post William Gibson’s First Comic, and 4 Others to Read This May appeared first on WIRED.
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Lily James on Why Everyone Should Read War and Peace, Downton Abbey’s Final Season, and Meeting the Royal Family

If you relied on CliffsNotes to get through Shakespeare, Tolstoy, or just about any book longer than 300 pages, that reasoning doesn't exactly work for Lily James. "[War and Peace] is the most beautiful story…


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Read This And Die!: An Interview With R.L. Stine

In a two-story house in suburban Ohio, something was lurking.

Was it a strange presence in the attic, whipping around corners and rattling the floorboards, that lent the house an air of eeriness? Or was it a shadowy figure sitting stone-still in a dark basement, patiently awaiting the next underground visitor?

More likely, neither of these mystical beings were present in the childhood home of horror writer R.L. Stine. It was the absence, rather than the presence, of such scary creatures that allowed him to dream them up over the course of his storied career.

And what a storied career. Stine has written hundreds and sold millions of books over the past few decades, most of them belonging to his beloved Goosebumps and Fear Street series, made popular by TV and movie adaptations. He’s still writing Fear Street books and scary adult stories — in his most recent, The Lost Girl, a yearbook from decades earlier clues a clan of kids into a classmate’s spooky identity. 

Stine’s life as a writer of the weird and wicked will be celebrated in a kid’s movie starring Jack Black, highlighting the nostalgic monsters from Goosebumps books.

“He’s a good R.L. Stine. He’s a lot more sinister than I am, Jack. He’s a lot more evil,” Stine said in an interview with The Huffington Post.

He’s right: Stine might’ve shown up to meet me wearing all black, but nothing else about his appearance alluded a witchy interior life. The creator of stories that haunted so many ’90s kids’ childhoods was mostly kind, if matter-of-fact. “Kids are always disappointed when I visit schools and come out,” he said. “They expect me to be evil or maybe wear a black cape or have fangs or something, and then this old guy walks out and they say, ‘Oh, no.’”

For our full interview with R.L. Stine, listen to the audio clip.

Though capeless, Stine offered me anecdotes from his childhood, and insights into the decidedly practical writing process that would lead to such whimsical tales of horror and intrigue as Night of the Living Dummies and Say Cheese and Die. In the latter book — a philosophical story as far as Goosebumps goes — a mythical camera has the power to cast its subjects forever into the afterlife, or at least give those who pose for it minor injuries. Like many of Stine’s books, there are cultural references embedded within it. In fact, Stine got the idea for the book from a similar episode of “The Twilight Zone” called “A Most Unusual Camera.”

“A lot of the Goosebumps titles are from these ’50s horror movies my brother and I saw every week,” Stine said. “‘It Came from Beneath the Sea’ became a Goosebumps book called It Came from Beneath the Sink. That kind of thing.”

Aside from the horror movies he saw on Sundays with his brother — which, it’s worth noting, Stine found more funny than scary — his childhood was typical. Beyond being bullied as a kid, there wasn’t much for him to be afraid of, at least within the walls of his own home, where Stine would stake out for hours, typing feverishly on his aunt’s typewriter.

“I was like nine years old, and I’d be in my room, typing, typing up joke magazines and funny little comics,” Stine said. “I never planned to be scary, I always just wanted to be funny. And I’d be typing up these funny stories, but I don’t know why. And my mother would be outside my door, and she’d say, ‘What’s wrong with you? Go outside and play!’ And I’d say, ‘It’s boring out there!’ Someone asked me what’s the worst advice anyone ever gave you, and I had to say, it’s my mother saying, ‘Stop typing and go outside and play.’”

Stine had been writing humor magazines for decades, developing his voice while contributing to Ohio State University’s satirical paper The Sundial in the mid-’60s, before he fell slantwise into writing scary books. Under the pen name of “Jovial Bob,” he wrote 101 School Cafeteria Jokes, The Cool Kid’s Guide to Summer Camp, and, yes, 101 Silly Monster Jokes, and many others until he wrote his first horror story in 1986. Even with his Goosebumps and Fear Street series, Stine insists that it’s never his aim to write straightforwardly scary books; his stories are, in his opinion, a combination of humor and fear.

“It’s the same kind of guttural reaction,” Stine said, adding, “I’m kind of odd because scary stuff doesn’t scare me. Horror always makes me laugh. I’m always the one in the movie theatre and the shark comes up, and it chews the girl up — I’m always the one laughing. I don’t know why.”

Perhaps its his ability to view scary situations as an objective outsider rather than a participant. When Stine describes how he began writing Goosebumps books, or where he gets his ideas for his scariest scenes, he’s notably hard-nosed. He has no illusions about divine inspiration or the uniqueness of his ideas. Instead, it’s clear that Stine views writing as a job, and his celebrated series as his successful business.

“I was so pleased with myself,” Stine said about the day he conceived of his first horror series. “I had individual titles of teen horror, I was just starting out. The first one was called Blind Date. The next was called Twisted. And the publisher wanted one a year, and I thought, gee, one a year? There must be a way to do a series. And then we started thinking about location and that kind of thing, and I thought, if I can think of a good name for the series, I’ll be off to a good start.”

The name popped into his head, a punchy-sounding packaging: “Fear Street.” From those words, he came up with a concept: rather than a recurring cast of characters, which would be impractical for a genre that concerns itself with killing off protagonists, the events would all center on a cursed residential street — one that could exist in any suburban town.

“Of course, I always wonder why they don’t move to Happy Street,” Stine joked, adding that it was essential to him that the setting be Midwestern. Although he promptly moved to New York City after college, and still lives there with his wife and son Matthew, Stine won’t set a horror book there on principle.

“It’s a superstition,” Stine said. “I’ve never done it. A lot of kids don’t know New York. They know a nice suburban backyard, but they don’t know New York City. It’s kind of elite in some ways, I think. I think it would make the stories more obscure for kids.”

So, guided by his principles about relatable storytelling, Stine was sure to set each Goosebumps and Fear Street book in a nondescript, middle-class kitchen or basement. This virtue-driven approach echoes throughout his entire approach to writing: Stine praises the merits of a detailed outline, and of writing the titles and the endings to his scary stories first, “so I know how to fool the reader and keep them from getting to the end [before me].”

“I work backwards from most authors,” Stine said. “Most authors have an idea for a book, they write, they’re writing, later on they think of a title. I have to start with a title. It leads me to the story. Kids always ask — everyone asks — ‘Where do you get your ideas?’ I wanna say, ‘Where do you get your ideas?’ Because we all get ideas. Mine actually come from thinking of the title first. The first of the new Fear Street books — Party Games — I had that title, and I thought, it lead me to the story. There’s a party. Maybe it’s a birthday party. Maybe they’re playing some kind of games and the games get out of hand.”

Next, Stine painstakingly drafts a 15-20 page outline that includes plot and dialogue before he sets out to fill in the holes. The biggest point of deliberation that he dwells on is making sure the scares in his works are suitable for the age group he’s writing for.

“I’m very careful in Goosebumps,” Stine said. “I have to make the kids know that what’s happening in the book couldn’t really happen. That it’s just a fantasy. And then when I write a Fear Street book or an adult book, I have to make people think it could happen. It’s kind of the opposite.”

Still, he insists that most fears are universal, existing from when we’re young and gullible, through the travails of adulthood.

“I think we all have the same kind of fears. And it’s the one thing that doesn’t change. Fear of the dark, fear there’s something in the closet, fear there’s someone under your bed waiting to grab your ankle when you sit up,” Stine said. “People always say, ‘How’ve kids changed? Over all the time you’ve been writing these books, how have they changed?’ And I always say, well, the technology has changed but the fears don’t change.”

Stine, the master of crafting scary scenarios, counts himself exempt from these universal fears. When I asked him what he was scared of, he said, “Not a thing.”

Laughing, he added, “Normal adult things. All these years and I don’t have a good answer for that question. That’s terrible, isn’t it?”

 

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Downton Abbey – Men’s – Read Books T Shirt

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What to Read When

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Read Pam Allyn’s posts on the Penguin Blog The books to read aloud to children at the important moments in their lives. In What to Read When , award-winning educator Pam Allyn celebrates the power of reading aloud with children. In many ways, books provide the first opportunity for children to begin to reflectively engage with and understand the world around them. Not only can parents entertain their child and convey the beauty of language through books, they can also share their values and create lasting connections. Here, Allyn offers parents and caregivers essential advice on choosing appropriate titles for their childrentaking into account a child’s age, attention ability, gender, and interests along with techniques for reading aloud effectively. But what sets this book apart is the extraordinary, annotated list of more than three hundred titles suitable for the pivotal moments in a child’s life. With category themes ranging from friendship and journeys to thankfulness, separations, silliness, and spirituality, What to Read When is a one-of-a-kind guide to how parents can best inspire children through reading together. In addition, Pam Allyn includes an indispensable Reader’s Ladder section, with recommendations for children at every stage from birth to age ten. With the author’s warm and engaging voice throughout, discussion questions to encourage in-depth conversations, as well as advice on helping kids make the transition to independent reading, this book will help shape thoughtful, creative, and curious children, imparting a love of reading that will last a lifetime. These Penguin Young Reader’s Books are referenced in What to Read When Sylvia Jean: Drama Queen by Lisa Campbell Ernst (Penguin Young Reader’s Group: 2005) Two Is For Twins , by Wendy Cheyette Lewison, illustrations by Hiroe Nakata (Penguin Young Readers: 2006) Remember Grandma? by Laura Langston (Penguin Group (USA): May 2004) Soul Looks Back in Wonder compiled by Tom Feelings (Puffin Books) Time of Wonder by Robert McCloskey (Penguin Books USA, Incorporated: December 1957) When I was Young in the Mountains by Cynthia Rylant illustrated by Diane Goode (Penguin Young Readers Group: January 1993) Nana Upstairs and Nana Downstairs by Tomie DePaola (Puffin Books, an imprint of Penguin Books, Inc.:1973) Good Night, Good Knight by Shelly Moore Thomas, illustrations by Jennifer Plecas (Penguin Young Readers Group: 2002)
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17 Timeless Books Our Dads Read To Us When We Were Young

Reading to a squirming child can be a bit of a chore, especially the kind of child who demands to hear Goodnight Moon five times every night for a year and a half. Still, it’s one of the most rewarding ways parents can spend time with their little ones: fostering a love of books, cuddling, and creating lifelong memories. For parents who spend their days at work, the bedtime story can be a particularly cherished tradition.

With Father’s Day on the horizon, we wanted to remember the times our dads took the time to read a favorite book to us when we were small. Some of our dads read us Seuss, and some read us sci-fi, but one thing is for sure — we all remember the books our fathers read with us, and the joy those story times brought to our childhoods.

Below, in no particular order, HuffPosters recall the books their dads shared with them growing up. Tell us about your favorite childhood memory of reading with your dad in the comments!

1. The Hobbit

hobbit

No offense to Andy Serkis, but you haven’t heard the true voice of Gollum unless you were there when my dad read The Hobbit and the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy aloud to my brothers and me when we were little. He’s an English professor, not a voice actor, but he got into the performance aspect with gusto, and even 20 years later, I can hear his Gollum impression in my mind’s ear. Unfortunately when he tried Watership Down, the bedtime reading tradition fell apart — we couldn’t get on board with warring bunnies — but I’ll always love that he looked at us three kids, all well under the age of 10, and thought, “Yep, it’s time to tell them a story about a faceless evil power bringing an end to life as we’d like to know it.” Thanks, Dad. -Claire Fallon, Culture Writer

2. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel

mike mulligan

Before he retired, my dad was an electrician in New York City, a job that is full of tough guys doing physical labor. I wonder if him reading Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel to me and my siblings sticks out in my mind now because it gave a humanlike face and feelings to heavy-duty machinery, much like the kind I imagined my father working with all day. It brought my dad and his looming 6-foot-6-inch stature down to our level figuratively and literally, because I think we’d usually pile around him on one of our beds or the living room couch when a reading was happening. Today, I wonder if turning the beloved steam shovel into a furnace (spoilers!!!) really was the best plot resolution, but it still stands. Or that’s just my childhood nostalgia speaking. -Jillian Capewell, Entertainment News Editor

3. The Lorax

lorax

My dad used to read The Lorax to me all the time when I was little. I’m not entirely sure why we got so into it — it must’ve just been Dr. Seuss’s entrancing meter and repetition that kept bringing us back to it. To this day we’ll still sometimes say to each other “Those trees! Those trees! Those truffula trees!” -Alexandra Svokos, College & Education Fellow

4. Father and Daughter Tales

father daughter tales

My dad and I used to always read Father and Daughter Tales before I went to bed. When he was tired, he would sometimes skip parts of the story, but I had the entire book memorized, so I always caught him. When he would finish reading, he would always ask me, “So, what’s the moral of the story?” And sometimes, when we couldn’t track down Father and Daughter Tales he would read me Mother and Daughter Tales! -Michelle Persad, Fashion Editor

5. Hop On Pop

pop

When I was really little (2 to 4 years old) and learning to read, my dad and I would read Hop On Pop by Dr. Seuss. Well, he would read it me and use his finger to point to the words. I technically couldn’t actually read what was on the pages, but I memorized the book. Then, being inspired by the message of the book, I would subsequently attempt to hop on pop. -Eva Hill, Video Editor and Lead Animator

6. Miss Nelson Is Missing!

nelson

One of my fondest memories with my dad is when he used to read books to my sister, brother, and I. Some of the books that were a part of that childhood memory are Abiyoyo by Pete Seeger and Owl Moon by Jane Yolen, which both hold special places in my heart. But our ultimate favorite that Dad would read was Miss Nelson Is Missing! by Harry Allard. Why? Because as my dad puts it, “You guys were really surprised that the mean substitute teacher was Miss Nelson!” -Jacqueline Howard, Associate Editor, HuffPost Science

7. Officer Buckle and Gloria

gloria

When I was little, my dad would read to me every night before bed. One of my favorite books we read together was Officer Buckle and Gloria by Peggy Rathmann. It’s the story of a police officer who tours the town of Napville teaching kids about safety. (The name “Napville” never struck me as odd before now … possibly because nap time was always a mandatory Williams family activity). Officer Buckle’s presentation receives a little spice with the addition of Gloria, a police dog with a penchant for dramatics. As Officer Buckle lists off his safety tips, Gloria acts out each potential catastrophe behind him, delighting their young audience. The story is funny, heartwarming, and features an acting dog, so basically I was in little-kid heaven. Even so, I’d often ask my dad to “read it funny,” at which point he’d go off-script and make up a nonsensical story, complete with voices and silly faces. I would laugh hysterically. And even after all this time, I still live by Officer Buckle’s Safety Tip #77: Never stand on a swivel chair. -Abigail Williams, Associate Social Media Editor

8. Frog and Toad Are Friends

frog

My dad would read Arnold Lobel’s Frog and Toad Are Friends to me and my sister — in particular the story “A Lost Button,” in which Toad loses a button off his jacket, and then he and Frog search for it. They find a bunch of buttons, but none of them are Toad’s. When my dad read us the story, he would read Toad’s dialogue with a mounting, apoplectic rage that I’m pretty sure Lobel didn’t include in the original version. “That is not my button,” my dad would snarl in Toad’s voice. “That button is SQUARE. My button is ROUND.” Obviously, hearing Toad grow closer and closer to snapping completely and murdering his best friend was, to me and my sister, the funniest thing in the world. -Alexander Eichler, News Editor

9. Tom Brown’s School Days

tom

My dad read a book out loud to me and my brother that no one has ever mentioned since to me: Tom Brown’s School Days. Never heard of it? That’s because your parent did not grow up in freshly independent India, in the shadow of the British Raj. Frankly, I don’t remember much about the actual story beyond a blur of boys and green fields. (A quick Wikipedia skim tells me the semi-autobiography was set in a country school in England — Rugby School — where in the early 1800s the book’s author, Thomas Hughes, got schooled). What I do remember is the Pavlovian thrill the sight of that worn and stark blue cover — no illustrations — stirred in me each night my dad brought it down from the shelf. This was the end of the day, the only time where I actually knew precisely where we all were for a stretch of time. It could have been any book. -Mallika Rao, Culture Reporter

10. The Napping House

napping house

My dad Kevin didn’t just read stories — The Napping House by Audrey Wood was always in the rotation — he was also amazing at making them up. “The Four Bears and The Red Bud Berries” was a favorite for my three siblings and me. Now he reads to and makes up stories for my kids, Eli and Henry, and man oh man, it melts my heart. -Katie Nelson, National Editor

11. Day of Infamy

infamy

I know what you’re thinking: A 1957 non-fiction book about the attack on Pearl Harbor isn’t exactly sentimental. Bear with me. My father, a surgeon, worked very long hours. But he always made time for me — on weekends, at nights before I went to sleep — and he liked nothing more than sharing his vast knowledge about history. He got that knowledge from books, most of which he kept in the library that was across the hallway from my bedroom.

It’s still there, with deep brown wood bookcases that go from floor to ceiling, only now he’s had to pile the books two deep in some places. He’d also taken over the shelves in another part of the house, much to my poor mother’s occasional dismay. But I get it. The library was the room that always made me happiest. I’d sit there for hours, plucking titles off the shelves and flipping through them in my father’s beat-up recliner chair.

Day of Infamy was one of the first “adult” books I could read as a kid. I must have gone through it a dozen times, which seems weird until you put yourself in the mind of an 11- or 12-year-old. Reading it made me feel grown-up. It made me feel like Dad. And that made me feel good. By the way, I’ve tried hard to carry on that tradition with my own two boys, both of whom hang out in my library and, before bed, demand that I give them history lessons. I’m not sure how much they like the history and how much they just like hanging out with me. But I don’t really care and I imagine my father has always felt the same way. -Jonathan Cohn, Senior National Correspondent

12. Make Way For Ducklings

duck

I have fond memories of reading a number of “vintage” books with my dad when I was little. One of our favorites was Make Way For Ducklings by Robert McCloskey. It’s a book that’s been around for a while, but the black-and-white drawings are still packed with action. I remember appreciating how the policemen went out of their way to assist the ducks and keep them safe during their journey to the pond. And when I visited Boston many years later, I was excited to see the statues of the Mallard family in Boston Common. Seeing them brought back memories of the many evenings my dad and I spent sharing the ducklings’ story together. -Sara Bondioli, Deputy Politics Editor

13. The Call of the Wild

wild

In middle school we had to read The Call of the Wild, which literally bored me to tears. To encourage me, my dad promised to read every chapter with me — he even took notes. At the end of the chapters we’d sit down and discuss what had happened and what we thought would happen next. Though it’s far from being one of my favorite books, I sort of like it, because without reading it, I would have never had that bonding experience with my dad. -Yagana Shah, Huff/Post50 Associate Editor

14. Into the Land of the Unicorns

unicorns

My dad demonstrated incredible patience in repeatedly reading first-grade me a novel called Into the Land of the Unicorns. It involved a young girl who got magically transported into a bizarre unicorn-inhabited land to deliver a secret message to the queen unicorn. Needless to say, this was probably not riveting reading material for a man in his 40s, but my dad persevered with enthusiasm and a (semi-limited) range of voices for different characters. -Hilary Hanson, Crime and Weird News Editor

15. Curious George Goes to an Ice Cream Shop

curious george

When I was little, I loved reading Curious George with my dad. The most memorable book from the series is Curious George Goes to an Ice Cream Shop. It indulged my love of ice cream while instilling the importance of patronizing local businesses, even if the owners are a little crabby. -Katelyn Bogucki, Multimedia Producer

16. Ender’s Game

ender

I never was that into science fiction (not much has changed), but somehow, when I was in elementary school, my dad coaxed me into reading Ender’s Game, one of the many Orson Scott Card books he read. I loved it, and have probably read it a dozen times since. Looking back, it’s no surprise a story about a student chosen for a special adventure to save the world appealed to a daydreamy, bookish kid — it’s actually just like Harry Potter, if Harry Potter had futuristic technology of the ‘80s instead of magic and a space station instead of a wizard school. At the time, I loved having something to bond over with my dad, and also read all of the (much more boring) sequels for that reason. Now, I’m grateful that he taught me the rewards of being adventurous in my reading and otherwise, pushed me to take chances on the unfamiliar and took the time to share something he genuinely loved with his daughter. -Kate Abbey-Lambertz, Detroit Editor

17. The Golden Compass

compass

I grew up in a family that loved science fiction and fantasy, so one of the first books that I remember bonding with my dad about with was The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman. The protagonist Lyra was a fearless, talkative girl who was highly intelligent and loved adventure. That book was the beginning of our love for other fantasy and young adult books — including Harry Potter, Stargirl and The Lord of the Rings. Because Father’s Day and my birthday happen around the same time every year, it’s a special time for my dad and I to talk to each other about books and what we’re reading — as well as our love of reading. The written word has evolved from handwritten letters to words on a page to texting — and I wouldn’t trade the evolution of my relationship with my dad and our love of reading for anything. -Madeline Wahl, Blogs & Community Associate Editor

BONUS: Fermat’s Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World’s Greatest Mathematical Problem

fermat

When I was about 11, my dad, an engineer with a sick sense of humor, informed me that if I wanted to return to camp that summer, I would have to read and report on Fermat’s Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World’s Greatest Mathematical Problem, the scintillating, true tale of a mathematician doing … math stuff. I have no idea if my dad was actually trying to get me interested in something he enjoyed, or was just playing a cruel parenting joke. While I complained and put it off ’til the last minute, I did read the entire thing, and I think I understood it. I maybe even secretly enjoyed the historical drama parts, but now I can remember the taunting image of Fermat’s face on the cover of Simon Singh’s book better than I could explain what an + bn = cn means. Still, this story is one of my favorites about me and my dad, one of the most revealing about our relationship and bound to crack us up if we retell it. -Kate Abbey-Lambertz, Detroit Editor

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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You Read To Me, I'll Read To You: Very Short Stories To Read Together: Very Short Stories To Read Together

You Read To Me, I'll Read To You: Very Short Stories To Read Together: Very Short Stories To Read Together


Here''s a book With something new – You read to me! I''ll read to you! We''ll read each page To one another – You''ll read one side, I the other. But who will read – Now guess this riddle – When the words are In the middle? The answer''s easy! Plain as pie! We''ll read together, You and I.
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21 Books From The Last 5 Years That Every Woman Should Read

books every woman

The one struggle of being a woman who reads is that you want to read everything.

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by bestseller lists, because there just isn’t enough time in the day to read every hot new book. Between near-constant recommendations of amazing memoirs, new sequels and a terrifyingly long list of bookmarked Internet longreads, it can be stressful to choose what you should pick up next. Knowing which classics you’re missing from your reading repertoire is easy — it’s a little harder to remember what you’ve missed from three years ago.

We’ve done a little bit of the hard work for you (or maybe just increased your book stress… sorry) by pulling together a list of incredible titles from the past few years that you should add to the pile on your bedside table. These books by women are just a few of the incredible titles published recently — an exhaustive list would be hundreds of books longer. Those listed here are some of the most-discussed, thought-provoking and life-changing books from a diverse group of women writers. They make you rethink what being a feminist means, offer life advice to women of all ages, and reinforce your long-held belief that Tina and Amy should be your best friends and life coaches forever. The novels are some of the finest writing from woman authors. From lighthearted memoirs to harrowing thrillers, there’s a genre here for everyone.

Here are 21 books published in the past 5 years that all women should read:

What would you add to our list? Comment below, or tweet @HuffPostWomen!

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Samsung 840 Evo Mz-mte500 500 Gb 2.5″ Internal Solid State Drive – Mini-sata – 512 Mb Buffer – 97000iops Random 4kb Read – 88000iops Random 4kb Write (mz-mte500bw)

Samsung 840 Evo Mz-mte500 500 Gb 2.5″ Internal Solid State Drive – Mini-sata – 512 Mb Buffer – 97000iops Random 4kb Read – 88000iops Random 4kb Write (mz-mte500bw)


Light and slim Protect your data with a secure encryption engine Deliver faster sequential write speeds Stay connected longer with extended battery life Keep your PC performance safe from heat Technical Information Storage Capacity: 500 GB Features: Multi-level Cell Flash, S.M.A.R.T, Self-encrypting Drive, 256-bit Hardware Encryption, TurboWrite Technology, Dynamic Thermal Guard Protection, Triple-level Cell Flash, Native Command Queuing (NCQ), TRIM Command, Garbage Collection Drive Performance Maximum External Data Transfer Rate: 768 MBps (6 Gbps) Maximum Read Transfer Rate: 540 MBps Maximum Write Transfer Rate: 520 MBps Random 4KB Read: 97000IOPS Random 4KB Write: 88000IOPS Buffer: 512 MB Network & Communication Wireless LAN: No Interfaces/Ports Drive Interface: mini-SATA Drive Interface Standard: SATA/600 Network (RJ-45): No Power Description Input Voltage: 5 V DC Physical Characteristics Color: Black Drive Type: Internal Form Factor: Plug-in Module Durability: Shock Resistant, Vibration Resistant Height: 2″ Width: 1.2″ Depth: 0.2″ Weight (Approximate): 0.35 oz Miscellaneous System Requirements: Operating System(s): Windows 8 (32-bit and 64-bit) Windows 7 (32-bit and 64-bit) Windows Vista Windows XP Mac OS Certifications & Standards: IEEE 1667 Device Supported: Notebook, Desktop PC Warranty Limited Warranty: 3 Year

Price: $
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Patriot: The “mind blowing” thriller you need to read.

Patriot: The “mind blowing” thriller you need to read.


‘Patriot’ moves at a cracking pace, Homeland channeled by Bear Grylls. the name’s Bond, AS Bond, watch this space.”Nick Hazlewood, author and screen writer.”Patriot is Brooke Kinley’s first outing and I’m already picturing her adventures on the big screen.”Crime Thriller HoundWhat would you do for your country? In Afghanistan, a US Army Patrol is devastated by an enemy with sophisticated weaponry, while in D.C, Pentagon staffer Scott Jenson tips off the ambitious young reporter Brooke Kinley about a billionaire businessman’s involvement in terrorism. But why is the White House determined to protect this businessman, and why does the answer seem to lie in the Canadian wilderness? In a dangerous journey to the remotest parts of the world, Brooke races to prevent a catastrophic attack on America, but can she uncover the real traitor?Author:A.S Bond is an internationally acclaimed travel writer and journalist. As the author of seven books, AS’s own adventures have taken her around the world, from the cloud forests of Central America to D.C.’s corridors of power. A.S. Bond is a pen name. Praise for AS Bond’s earlier books (written as Alexandra Pratt):”I have known a few wonderful-crazy, damn-fool writers who would risk their lives for a great adventure story, but I have met only two – both husky, well-experienced outdoorsmen – who would have paddled a canoe into the Labrador wilds. And one of them is dead. Alexandra Pratt is so reckless she scares me and so entrancing that I could not put her book down.” – Ken McGoogan, author of Fatal Passage’lyrical and adventurous” – Conde Nast Traveler”The writing is stunning.” – Canoeist Magazine”The climax is pure adventure.” – Spirit of Canada Magazine

Price: $
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Hot Pursuit and More Picks to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

This weekend is Mother's Day, which means 1. You still have two days to get a killer gift and 2. You have to plan brunch around these can't-miss entertainment offerings. Or, just have your mom/grandma/MIL/etc….




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Orphan Black’s Season 3 Premiere and More Picks to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

This week has been full of entertainment ups (the new Star Wars trailer, SJP's return to television, a new gal to love on RHONY) and downs (that death on Scandal, the undecided fate of some…




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John Boehner, Nancy Pelosi, Kevin McCarthy & Bernie Sanders Read ‘Mean Tweets’

What does Speaker of the House John Boehner have to promise his constituents to keep getting reelected? What new job should House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi try? Who does Sen. Bernie Sanders most resemble? And what does Rep. Kevin McCarthy really need to do?

In the spirit of late night host Jimmy Kimmel’s recurring “Mean Tweets” segment, some of the nation’s top lawmakers read mean tweets about themselves for the 2015 Radio & Television Correspondents Association Dinner, held Wednesday night — and the results are priceless.

Check it out in the clip above.
Comedy – The Huffington Post
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House of Cards (!!!) and More Options to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

If I'm being honest, I'm so tempted to hole up this weekend and stare at my computer screen until I understand how THAT DRESS IS ANYTHING BUT WHITE AND GOLD. But since doing so is…




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The 87th Academy Awards, and Everything Else to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

Between SNL 40, five hours of The Bachelor, and too many dating rumors to keep up with (mind blown over Prince Harry and Emma Watson), I'm so ready for this weekend. My Oscar picks are…




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50 Shades, SNL 40 and Everything Else to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

Apparently there's this movie coming out this weekend, based on these not very popular books, and starring these two totally unattractive actors…SIKE. Unless you've been holed up in an underground post-apocalyptic bunker a la Unbreakable…




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This Is The Juiciest eBay Listing You’ll Ever Read

In the market for slightly used lingerie purchased originally by a middle-aged married man for a 25-year-old he wanted to sleep with? How weird, you just missed that sale on eBay!

In a recent 500-word eBay listing, mom of three Sandra von Riekhoff offered up quite the backstory for the purple Agent Provocateur corset she was selling: The lingerie was purchased 15 years ago by a 40-year-old married man who wanted to make her his mistress.

“I have only worn it while drunk. It looks ridiculous otherwise,” von Riekhoff wrote in the ad. “Try standing with it on, flat foot in broad daylight. It appears desperate.”

Why unload such a gem after all this time? Outside of feeling guilty over taking it to begin with, von Riekhoff told the Huffington Post the teddy was simply not worth keeping around anymore.

“In this age of waste not, want not — and as an almost 40-year-old old mother of three — the lingerie was gathering dust,” she said.

Read the listing in all its glory below.

listing

ebay

ebaay

The corset ending up selling for 17 pounds (roughly $ 25 U.S.). Von Riekhoff said she wishes the buyer all the best.

“I hope she or he enjoys it while they can. Time is ticking!” she told The Huffington Post.

And if you’re bummed you missed the sale, don’t fret — there’s more where it came from. Von Riekhoff is now auctioning off a vintage Hérmes scarf the married man bought for her. (The receipt for the scarf was what tipped the wife off about her husband’s shady behavior.) All proceeds from the scarf will go to Sal’s Shoes, a charitable organization that collects and redistributes outgrown children’s shoes to kids in need.

Keep in touch! Check out HuffPost Divorce on Facebook and Twitter. Sign up for our newsletter here.
Comedy – The Huffington Post
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What to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

I sincerely hope you didn't make other plans for this weekend, because the entertainment offerings are that plentiful—and that good. So, unless it's something "major" like your own wedding, you better start making some calls…




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What to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

In honor of MLK weekend, first things first: If you haven't seen Selma yet, ignore the rest of this post and make that your No. 1 priority going forward. Seriously, go! If you have, we…




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The New Magazine Every Socially Aware Person Needs to Read

As a recent graduate of Harvard, I am perhaps too familiar with particular, traditional metrics of success that have come to be embraced by our society — namely money and power. Even as I try to be on “my own path,” pursuing personal essay writing, meditation editorial leadership and poetry all at once, I still look for mentors who really seem to be pursuing “the Third Metric” — what Arianna Huffington describes as “a third measure of success” consisting of “four pillars”: well-being, wisdom, wonder and giving.
 
Well among those mentors, near and far, is a fellow Harvard graduate named Kayla E., the Texas-based editor-in-chief of what I’ll call the “up and coming” magazine Nat. Brut. I got to know Kayla at school, somewhat peripherally, as a cartoonist and multimedia artist. I figured she would scurry off to a prestigious MFA program, the same way I figured I would scurry off to a PhD program. Yet both of us seem to be taking the “road not taken,” in some fashion. I was pleased to reconnect with Kayla this year upon discovering her adventures with Nat. Brut. In short, I think anyone interested in reading, writing, making art, looking at art, most social issues from race to gender to the environment and more, humor and so on, should know a thing or two about Nat. Brut. To me, this magazine embodies the Third Metric in action.
 
According to Nat. Brut’s recent Kickstarter, which successfully raised the necessary funds to permit the mag to exist online and in print (!), Nat. Brut was initially founded in 2012 with a deceptively simple goal: “to publish literature and art online and free of charge, so long as it was good.”
 
Well, after Kayla and her partner Axel Severs assumed the helm of the Nat. Brut ship one year ago (January 2014), they’ve expanded their goals without losing site of their social mission. When push comes to shove, their foundational mission is to use the magazine as a fun and intellectually stimulating means to make the world (both literary and otherwise) a better place.
 
So how do they aim to do this? Well, Nat. Brut is the only magazine out there that is committed to being socially progressive, environmentally sustainable, and representative of a wide demographic range of artists, writers and other creators. And they want to make it accessible to everyone! 
 
Why am I highlighting Nat. Brut now, as an exemplar for the values of the Third Metric? Well, because so many of us who are, on some level, committed to “success” and achievement have this sense that art and literature should be a realm of our lives where a sense of intimidation is somehow equivalent to rigor. Well not only does Nat. Brut give us content that is whimsical while critical, inclusive while rigorous, accessible while sophisticated.
 
Get ready for Nat. Brut’s first print issue — Issue Five, coming out March 2015. The issue will feature a curation of found photos by Rebecca Weisberg, work by Susan Te Kahurangi King, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Koa Beck and Deborah Grant along with other artists and writers. Oh and I really meant it when I said Nat. Brut is environmentally sustainable: Issue Five will be printed on 100% recycled paper. And they don’t even work with distributors, meaning no issues will be disposed of.

For all of the feminists out there sick of reading literary magazines that embrace elitist, patriarchal values, you should be especially ready to get to know Nat.Brut. For the upcoming issue, 75% of the contributions are from female artists and writers. The mag is going to consist of comics (and the comic section will be in the form of a fold-out poster), four hefty artist features, two photo features, fiction, poetry, an interview, and a humor supplement called SALE! One of their other goals is to showcase interconnectivity of mediums, just as we all aim to embrace the interconnectivity of all aspects in our lives, successful or not.
Arts – The Huffington Post
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슈에무라 Read to Wear Palette (6x Pressed Eye Shadow) – Black and White 6x1g/0.035oz

슈에무라 Read to Wear Palette (6x Pressed Eye Shadow) – Black and White 6x1g/0.035oz


Read to Wear Palette 6x Pressed Eye Shadow (#M black 990 #Smokey grayish black #Mon shu smokey gray #G silver #G white rainbow #M white 907) 1g/0.035oz
List Price: 83501.0
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What to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

I know I've already mentioned the weather once today (forgive me)—but seriously, these polar vortex temperatures here already make it ideal for staying in. Add these new streaming, music, book, and television options to the…




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What to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

I know the urge to binge-watch every episode of Friends on Netflix is powerfully strong, but the first entertainment offerings of 2015 are equally enticing (plus, Netflix will always be there). We've got Oscar bait,…




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Don’t Buy Another Pair of Jeans Until You Read This: The Trick for Longer, Leaner Legs

It feels like there are a million different pairs of jeans out there. Some are good and some are…ugly. A pair that fits perfectly is worth a million bucks, while others that don’t do anything for your shape should be tossed as quickly as you can get your arms moving. And even though we just discovered that most of us have way too many pairs in the closet, there’s no time like the new year to toss what doesn’t work and invest in a pair that’s guaranteed to make you look ah-mazing.

dl-1961-jeans

For expert insight on fit, I consulted with Sarah Ahmed, creative director of DL1961, and pestered her about how my legs can look long and lean because, honestly, what girl doesn’t want that?

For length, your best bet is “by far a mid-rise skinny jean. An 8.5- to 9-inch rise really does miracles for the appearance of both the waist and legs.” As an alternative, try a kick flare (it’s the style on the far left above). It’s more subtle than the mega-bells you might be thinking of and can actually add inches, especially if you get your pair tailored to wear with heels or platforms.

If you want to slim stems, Sarah said to look for styles with longer inseams (ask a sales associate to identify some of their options) and try on the darkest shade possible. “A deep blue or black wash tends to smooth the legs, making them appear much leaner.” I brought up the question of moto ribbing, which I think looks eternally cool but can cut legs in a not-so-flattering way. “You can have too much horizontal detailing,” she warned me, suggesting I shop for “ribbing that’s slanted to not have that dreaded digging-in effect.”

What’s your current favorite pair of jeans? Is there a miracle brand that always looks good on you?





Dressed
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PNY 64GB Turbo USB 3.0 Flash Drive, 95MB/s Read – $29.99 after coupon


Save 11.00 with coupon code QOV149602 at checkout. Normally 40.99 before coupon.
Now 29.99 after coupon.
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What to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

We may have lost the option to see The Interview, but that doesn't mean we are lacking for entertainment picks this weekend. Here's the best in movies, TV, music, and more for the days ahead—enjoy!…




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PNY 256GB Turbo Attach? 2 USB 3.0 185MB/s Read – $109.99 after coupon


Save 40.00 with coupon code LYW150112 at checkout. Normally 149.99 before coupon.
Now 109.99 after coupon.
Offer ends Dec 21 2014 12:00AM
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What to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

This weekend, you most likely fall into one of two camps: You've had your Hunger Games tickets and your Katniss-braid ready to go for weeks, and will be camping outside your local movie theater hours…




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Jimmy Kimmel’s Celebrities Read Mean Tweets #8 Is All The Laughs, Per Usual

Jimmy Kimmel’s always hilarious Celebrities Read Mean Tweets series returned with an eighth edition Thursday night. “Modern Family” star Ty Burrell and Britney Spears were teased as some of the A-list participants in this round and, well, they did not disappoint.

Watch above as the stars read those nasty 140-character comments about them. Keep on keeping on, Twitter!
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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What to Watch, Read, Stream, and Listen to This Weekend

It's been a long week filled with way too many images of Kim Kardashian's very oily behind, but this weekend promises to provide plenty of welcome distractions—in the form of new, butt-free movies, books, Netflix…




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Ruff Says the Dog! Read Along

Ruff Says the Dog! Read Along


Learn what noises different farm animals make with this adorable book from the Babys First Books Collection. Each noise is paired with an adorable illustration to help baby with word association, and the black and white art complimented with a burst of color will capture babys attention. Words are highlighted as read making it easy to follow along.

Price: $
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Time to Read Rocker

Time to Read Rocker


Here’s a gift that lets Mom and Dad share quality time with their little one, reading books together. The Time to Read rocker features lovely pastel shades of blue and lilac with white accents, a wooden rack that keeps books off the floor and a comfy, removable padded seat cushion. The seat back includes a battery-operated clock, the message “Time to Read,” and a sweet poem. A stamp beneath the seat lets you personalize the chair with the child’s name, the name of the gift-giver and the special occasion when the chair is received. A photo greeting card is also included, so the child can say “thank you” in a memorable way. The rocker is 28″ high, with a seat height of 12 1/2″. The interior dimensions of the wooden rack are 11 1/4″ l x 3 1/3″ w x 9 1/2″ h.
List Price: $ 174.99
Price: $ 174.99

Creating Room to Read

Creating Room to Read


The inspirational story of a former Microsoft executive’s quest to build libraries around the world and share the love of books What’s happened since John Wood left Microsoft to change the world? Just ask six million kids in the poorest regions of Asia and Africa. In 1999, at the age of thirty-five, Wood quit a lucrative career to found the nonprofit Room to Read. Described by the San Francisco Chronicle as “the Andrew Carnegie of the developing world,” he strived to bring the lessons of the corporate world to the nonprofit sector—and succeeded spectacularly. In his acclaimed first book, Leaving Microsoft to Change the World, Wood explained his vision and the story of his start-up. Now, he tackles the organization’s next steps and its latest challenges—from managing expansion to raising money in a collapsing economy to publishing books for children who literally have no books in their native language. At its heart, Creating Room to Read shares moving stories of the people Room to Read works to help: impoverished children whose schools and villages have been swept away by war or natural disaster and girls whose educations would otherwise be ignored. People at the highest levels of finance, government, and philanthropy will embrace the opportunity to learn Wood’s inspiring business model and blueprint for doing good. And general readers will love Creating Room to Read for its spellbinding story of one man’s mission to put books within every child’s reach.

Price: $
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Mcgraw Hill How To Read Nautical Chart, 2nd Edition

Mcgraw Hill How To Read Nautical Chart, 2nd Edition


Mcgraw Hill How To Read Nautical Chart, 2nd Edition . The classic How to Read a Nautical Chart explains every aspect of electronic and paper nautical charts: how a chart is assembled, how to gauge the accuracy of chart data, how to read charts created by other governments, how to use information such as scale, projection technique and datum that every chart contains; how not to get fooled or run aground by overzooming. Nigel Calder teaches you how to squeeze every ounce of information out of a nautical chart (on your GPS, chartplotter, or nav station) and understand the limits of accuracy for all charts, paper and electronic, raster and vector.
List Price: $ 21.00
Price: $ 21.00

Pediatrics Group Wants Parents to Read to Their Children Every Day

The practice should begin in infancy, American Academy of Pediatrics says, to prepare kids for school, life
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SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN!-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News-
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Mcgraw Hill How To Read Nautical Chart

Mcgraw Hill How To Read Nautical Chart


Mcgraw Hill How To Read Nautical Chart . Nigel Calder. Nautical charts contain an incredible amount of information for those who know how to decipher them. But without a key to the symbology, a chart can be bewildering. Nigel Calder, one of today s most respected boating authors, helps you make sense complex system of signs, symbols, and graphic elements with this compact, waterproof, and nearly indestructible guide.
List Price: $ 8.95
Price: $ 5.77

How Rocket Learned to Read Book

How Rocket Learned to Read Book


A little yellow bird teaches Rocket the dog how to read by first introducing him to the “wondrous, mighty, gorgeous alphabet.” By Tad Hills, 40 pages, Hardcover. ISBN: 0375858997 EAN: 9780375858994
List Price: $ 17.99
Price: $ 6.99