Marchesa Donates ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Gown to the Smithsonian

Marchesa is having a historic moment.
The brand, established in 2004 by Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig, is donating the blue dress that actress Constance Wu wore in the film “Crazy Rich Asians” to the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. The dress will be presented Saturday during “The Party: A Smithsonian Celebration of Asian-Pacific Americans,” a Los Angeles event hosted by the Smithsonian’s Asian-Pacific American Center at City Market Social House.
The event recognizes the contributions of Asian-Pacific Americans to history and culture across industries, including music, film, sports and culinary arts.
Wu, who played the role of Rachel Chu, wears the dress when she attends a high-profile wedding in defiance of her boyfriend’s disapproving mother. The gown is a floor-length Grecian-style dress made of light blue tulle with floral appliqué, a deep V-neck and a cinched waist. The original version of the dress designed by Marchesa for its fall 2016 collection featured long sleeves, but they were temporarily removed by the film’s production for aesthetic purposes. The museum will receive the altered sleeveless version that appeared in the film.

Marchesa’s original gown from fall 2016. 

“Crazy Rich Asians” was recognized for having a mostly East Asian cast, and was the first Hollywood film

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Steve McQueen’s ‘Widows,’ Barry Jenkins’ ‘Beale Street’ Highlight Smithsonian African American Film Festival

WASHINGTON — The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture kicks off its inaugural film festival on Wednesday, with Steve McQueen’s “Widows” as the opening selection and Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk” as the closing pic on Saturday. The Smithsonian African American Film Festival will screen about 80 movies over the […]

Variety

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Smithsonian Folkways FW-33904-CCD New American Music- Vol. 4

Smithsonian Folkways FW-33904-CCD New American Music- Vol. 4


Smithsonian Folkways Recordings is the nonprofit record label of the Smithsonian Institution, the national museum of the United States. We are dedicated to supporting cultural diversity and increased understanding among peoples through the documentation, preservation, and dissemination of sound. We believe that musical and cultural diversity contributes to the vitality and quality of life throughout the world. Through the dissemination of audio recordings and educational materials we seek to strengthen people’s engagement with their own cultural heritage and to enhance their awareness and appreciation of the cultural heritage of others. Noa Ain gives us a surreal portrait of violinist Yoko Matsua in Used to Call Me Sadness, Joel Chadabe encourages a solo percussionist to interact with an automated electronic system in Echoes, Ann McMillan manipulates animal sounds with recording techniques in Whale I, Gordon Mumma offers audience members Do It Yourself participation in Cybersonic Cantilevers and Vladimir Ussachevsky suggests a pre-biblical story of the creation of the world depicted by electronic chorale in Conflict. Year of Recording 1975. Record Label Folkways Records. Source Archive Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Credits Produced by Horace Walter Grenell; Design by Ronald Clyne. 101 Used to Call Me Sadness Noa Ain 9:09. 102 Echoes Joel Chadabe 11:17. 201 Whale I Ann McMillan 2:33. 202 Carrefours Ann McMillan 6:27. 203 Cybersonic Cantilevers Gordon Mumma 10:06. 204 Conflict Vladimir Ussachevsky 5:52.

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Smithsonian Folkways MON-00520-CCD The Soviet Army Chorus in a Program of Favorites

Smithsonian Folkways MON-00520-CCD The Soviet Army Chorus in a Program of Favorites


Smithsonian Folkways Recordings is the nonprofit record label of the Smithsonian Institution, the national museum of the United States. We are dedicated to supporting cultural diversity and increased understanding among peoples through the documentation, preservation, and dissemination of sound. We believe that musical and cultural diversity contributes to the vitality and quality of life throughout the world. Through the dissemination of audio recordings and educational materials we seek to strengthen people’s engagement with their own cultural heritage and to enhance their awareness and appreciation of the cultural heritage of others. Country(s) Russia; USSR (former). Keyword(s) World music. Year of Recording. Record Label Monitor Records. Source Archive Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Credits Artist Ansambl pesni i pliaski Sovetskoi Armii; Design by Push Pin; Alcorn. 101 A Toast to Friends The Soviet Army Chorus 3:40. 102 Sing Little Nightingale The Soviet Army Chorus 2:37. 103 Wait for Your Soldier The Soviet Army Chorus 3:38. 104 To an Army Man The Soviet Army Chorus 2:21. 105 Polka The Soviet Army Chorus 3:02. 106 Curling Waves The Soviet Army Chorus 4:37. 107 Free Will The Soviet Army Chorus 5:29. 201 The Cliff on the Volga The Soviet Army Chorus 6:06. 202 A Soldier’s Farewell The Soviet Army Chorus 2:19. 203 My Prayer The Soviet Army Chorus 3:02. 204 Dubinushka The Soviet Army Chorus 3:38. 205 The Little Bell The Soviet Army Chorus 3:40. 206 Stenka Razin (From Beyond the Island) The Soviet Army Chorus 5:53.

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Michelle Obama’s Second Inauguration Dress Headed To Smithsonian

WASHINGTON (AP) — Michelle Obama’s fashion is making history again, at least for the next year, as her second inaugural gown will be displayed at the Smithsonian Institution.

Before it’s stowed away for a future presidential library, Obama’s ruby-colored chiffon gown made by designer Jason Wu is being lent to the National Museum of American History for a year to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Smithsonian’s first ladies exhibition. The dress will be paired with Obama’s shoes designed by Jimmy Choo and will go on display beginning Tuesday. While the Smithsonian traditionally collects each first lady’s first inaugural gown, second gowns are usually shown only in presidential libraries. This is the first time the museum has displayed a second inaugural gown.

The dress was transferred to the National Archives but is being lent to the Smithsonian with the White House’s blessing. Smithsonian Curator Lisa Kathleen Graddy said it seemed like a nice time to start a new tradition in the ever-evolving First Ladies exhibit for those who serve two terms in the White House.

“The more I started thinking about it, it’s such a long time before the presidential library is built,” she said. “There’s such interest in the dress, I thought maybe it would be interesting if we could borrow the dress and do a special display, a special limited-time display here so that people would get a chance to see it.”

This dress drew headlines when Obama unveiled her selection one year ago. It was the second custom-made Jason Wu gown Obama had chosen, following the white gown Wu designed for the first lady when she arrived in Washington and on the fashion scene. Since then, Obama has become a trendsetter.

The red gown is embellished with cut velvet that carries a unique shimmer, Graddy said. It features a cross-halter strap neckline, and the ring at the top is adorned with small diamonds.

“It’s certainly a change, isn’t it, from the white dress with the train,” Graddy said, recalling Obama’s first gown in the museum’s collection. “It’s this amazing, vivid red. No train. So it’s a much slimmer dress — still flowing — but a much slimmer-lined dress. It’s an incredible change of color from that beautiful sparkly white.”

It’s unusual for a first lady to use the same designer twice, at least in recent decades. Wu has said it’s been the experience of his life to help dress the first lady, taking him from fashion insider to a household name since the first inauguration in 2009. Mrs. Obama also has turned to designer Thom Browne for special outfits, including her coat and dress for inauguration day in 2013.

Even her outfits from J. Crew draw notice, and some of Obama’s apparel choices sell out quickly online. For 2014, Pantone Inc.’s color of the year — orchid, a shade of purple — was introduced with a nod to the fact it’s a color Mrs. Obama often wears. Pantone sets color standards for the design industry.

From time to time, the people want to copy the fashion of a first lady, Graddy said, noting Jacqueline Kennedy as an example.

“People look at what she is wearing. They admire it,” she said of Obama. “I don’t think that fashion is Michelle Obama’s first priority. I think that obviously she’s interested in what she wears, and she puts a lot of thought into it — and that’s what people see and respond to is a very put-together look that they would like to emulate.”

The Jimmy Choo shoes paired with Obama’s second gown had a much shorter heel, seemingly more comfortable than her heels for the first inaugural, Graddy said. The first lady knew how long she would be on her feet for the second inaugural.

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National Museum of American History: http://americanhistory.si.edu/

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Follow Brett Zongker on Twitter at https://twitter.com/DCArtBeat .
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