STREET SIGNS: A Ma Maniére Living Merges Streetwear Retail With Hotel Suites

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A Ma Maniére is officially open, but it’s not open. Because of the hordes that lined H Street in Northeast D.C. on Friday, store owner James Whitner told the crowd that he’d postponed the opening, even as a few still meandered about hoping he would change his mind.
“We will never release a sneaker from this location again,” said Whitner, who on that day was releasing the Nike Off-White Prestos, the Adidas Yung-1s and several Jordans. “I’m going to try to tie releases to community outreach initiatives and if you participate, you can buy. I can’t change anything if I don’t change anything.”
For brands such as J.W. Anderson, Greg Lauren, Comme des Garçons Play and Visvim, Whitner’s A Ma Maniére concept is a chance for the brands to introduce themselves to a covetable customer. In most cases, Whitner opens shops in secondary markets such as Charlotte and Raleigh, N.C.; Pittsburgh; Houston, and Tampa Bay, Fla., and is the first person to bring these brands to a particular region. He also runs stores in Atlanta.

A Ma Maniere Living in Washington, D.C. 

Washington has a few streetwear and sneaker boutiques, including Ubiq, Diet Starts Monday, a retail store and restaurant, and

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St. James’s Retailers, Barbour International Take a Streetwear Turn at London Fashion Week Men’s

STREET SMARTS: Traditional men’s wear retailers from Jermyn Street, St. James’s took to the sidewalks of London for their fourth open-air show in a see-now-buy-now format during London Fashion Week Men’s.
New to the fashion week fixture were brands Paul & Shark, Aspinal of London and Grenson. The three brands joined seasoned labels Harvie & Hudson, John Smedley, Lock & Co. and Aquascutum in flexing their sartorial muscles.
The Jermyn Street retailers favored mustard yellow and cornflower blue separates. Bright, colored socks added a pop to traditional looks.

A look from the St. James’s spring 2019 show. 
Courtesy Photo

There were also streetwear staples in the mix, in the form of a camouflage-print windbreaker, a fishnet vest top and laid-back pieces such as cable-knit jumpers, gray track pants and basic T-shirts.
The see-now-buy-now presentation also saw female models dressed in men’s wear. One model wore a dark green slim-fit suit while another showed off a more summer-y look: Navy blue tailored shorts and a relaxed red pullover.
Later in the week, Barbour International showed off streetwear looks, too, incorporating elements from the brand’s classic Bedale jacket and T-shirts with retro-style brand logos.

Barbour International Men’s spring 2019. 
James Mason/WWD

A bright blue filmy jacket had a single-patch pocket that was swiped

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STREET SIGNS: McDonald’s Dabbles in Streetwear

Joseph Robinson is embarking on one of his biggest collaborations to date.
The founder of Joe Freshgoods and Don’t Be Mad, independent streetwear brands based in Chicago, received an e-mail from McDonald’s requesting that he design merchandise for the fast food behemoth.
“I was hesitant at first, because I’m such an independent brand and when you start partnering with companies like McDonald’s sometimes it’s like you have sold out,” said Robinson. “But at the end of the day I thought it would be inspiring to other kids who want to start brands and show them that they can do it, too.”
To build buzz around the launch of Mix by Sprite Tropic Berry, a new soft drink that will be exclusive to McDonald’s, the company recruited Robinson to design a capsule collection of racing-inspired merchandise that will be available at locations in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles and New York on May 25.

Starting at 2 p.m. local time, customers who purchase the Mix drink can take their receipt to a line to receive a piece from the assortment, which includes a short-sleeve T-shirt, a long-sleeve T-shirt, socks and a wool and leather varsity jacket covered in McDonald’s, Sprite and Joe Freshgoods logos. Customers who

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Pepsi Announces Art of Football Streetwear Capsule Collection

As extension of their #loveitliveit campaign, Pepsi is partnering with four fashion brands in celebration of the international game of football. The Art of Football capsule collection includes a worldwide group of brands including Anteater from Russia, Le Specs from Australia, Boohoo and Umbro from the U.K. and New Era from the U.S.
“Pop culture acumen — from sport and music to art and culture — is embedded in our Pepsi brand identity,” explained Natalia Filippociants, PepsiCo. senior marketing director. “Football is the world’s game and that culture and lifestyle goes beyond where and how we watch the game to how we love and live the game.”
The collection, which includes a range of streetwear apparel and accessories, including shorts, T-shirts, iPhone cases, backpacks and sunglasses, will be available beginning May 21 online and at retailers where the partner brands are sold.
The partnership also incorporates the artwork of emerging contemporary artists including Bicicleta Sam Freio, DXTR, Kim Sielbeck, DIYE and Iain Macarthur. “[This collection] brings the spirit and energy of football off the pitch and into lifestyle apparel and accessories,” Filippociants added.

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Street Signs: Will Streetwear Customers Buy a Tie?

Things are changing quickly within men’s wear. When WWD visited Guillermo Andrade a few months ago at 424 on Fairfax, the Los Angeles store he founded in 2010, Dior Homme was setting up a pop-up and Kris Van Assche was the creative lead. Now Van Assche is at Berluti, Kim Jones is at Dior Homme and Virgil Abloh is the creative director at Louis Vuitton men’s, signaling an arrival of sorts for the streetwear category.
Things have also changed with Andrade, who has his own label, named 424, that is carried at retailers including Barneys New York and Selfridges. Andrade has developed a design identity with his 424 armbands, hoodies and T-shirts with subtle social messages, and for spring is inching into new territory with a few tailored pieces.
Tailored clothing isn’t completely foreign to streetwear. Supreme created a seersucker suit with Brooks Brothers in 2014 and Off-White’s fall 2018 men’s wear collection was based on workplace uniforms. Andrade’s expansion could indicate how streetwear might evolve as it aims to stake out more floor space in department stores and grow up with its customers.
WWD spoke to Andrade about growing his L.A.-made streetwear brand, the viability of the category and the possibility of him taking

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Union’s Beth Gibbs, No Sesso Come at Streetwear With a Fresh Perspective

Maybe it’s about time, but streetwear’s Elizabeth Birkett Gibbs is on a path to building her label Bephie, bringing a new perspective into the category now more than 15 years in the making.
The fledgling streetwear brand quietly surfaced in late 2017 and will slowly build its way into the market via collaborations, the most recent of which is with Los Angeles genderless fashion brand No Sesso set to officially debut Saturday during a presentation at the Underground Museum. The pieces will be available for pre-order, in addition to T-shirts available at a pop-up during the celebration. It will also be sold exclusively at Union Los Angeles.
The collection, totaling under 20 pieces, is what Birkett Gibbs called “our version of streetwear with a little more edge.”
“We’re taking our silhouettes that we like to use everyday and making our own uniform,” Davis added.
The collection draws inspiration from the communities in the black church and hair as part of a celebration of Black History Month. Davis drew sketches of black women and their different hairstyles, which formed the basis of a print that’s seen on jumpers and pullovers, accented with neon zippers.
“That’s our streetwear,” Davis said.
“My hairstyle changes once a week,” Birkett Gibbs

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The Soloist Eschews Streetwear Label

Takahiro Miyashita doesn’t like labels.
While his collections for TakahiroMiyashita The Soloist have often been called streetwear, Miyashita is not a fan of this nomenclature.
“I don’t think of what I do as a street brand. I think of it as clothes,” he said. “I don’t want to be labeled as any particular category. I don’t say those things myself and I don’t really like it when other people say them about me either.”
Statements like these hint at Miyashita’s self-confidence, which shines through despite a very shy and humble demeanor. Soft spoken and pensive, he rarely makes eye contact from behind his tinted lenses and he chooses his words carefully before speaking.
With no formal fashion training, Miyashita could easily have been at a disadvantage when he launched his first line, Number (N)ine, in 1996. Yet he received wide critical acclaim when he began showing in Paris in 2003, and his current brand, started in 2010, has generated just as much buzz, if not more. He says one advantage to his not attending fashion school is that he can sometimes see things in a way that other trained designers cannot.
“I think that’s the good thing, but if we’re talking about the bad thing,

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What to Watch: How Emerging Streetwear Brands Are Navigating 2018

What’s next for streetwear? Critics of the category say the frenzy — see ComplexCon or the crowds that form around Supreme every week — is unsustainable and unhealthy for the market. Newer brands, meanwhile, believe it’s an ideal time to expand their businesses. Here, three young streetwear brands detail how they will approach the year and what they believe is in the pipeline for the category.
424

Del the Funky Homosapien in 424. 

Guillermo Andrade opened his Los Angeles concept store, FourTwoFour, which is located on Fairfax, in 2010. He sold pieces from Fear of God along with more established firms such as Rick Owens and Thom Browne. By 2014, Andrade started his own line, 424, that’s been picked up by retailers including Barneys New York and SSENSE.
WWD: What do you think about the current state of streetwear?
Guillermo Andrade: It seems to me that it is very positive. The amount of opportunity out there for a young brand like mine is exponential.
WWD: How do you plan on navigating the industry in 2018?
G.A.: Amongst the sea of hype and all the noise around hot brands, there is one thing that cannot be forgotten and that is product is king. I will continue to focus

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Streetwear Brands Cash In

When Supreme opened its Brooklyn store in early October, WWD asked Angelo Baque, the streetwear company’s former brand director who still oversees its art direction, if the business had changed since it collaborated with Louis Vuitton earlier in the year. His response? Everything was business as usual.
But the next day, WWD broke news that The Carlyle Group could be close to a deal to invest in the company. WWD later learned that the investment, which involved the private equity giant paying $ 500 million for a 50 percent stake in the business, had happened in July and the collaborative collection with Vuitton, which was unveiled at the brand’s men’s wear show in Paris in June, helped seal the deal.
The transaction gave Supreme an enterprise value of $ 1.1 billion, including $ 1 billion in equity and $ 100 million in debt. That translates into just under 10-times the company’s projected earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization of about $ 100 million, sources said.
Supreme declined to comment, but the deal has raised questions about the future of the cool kid brand — and streetwear in general. It immediately turned what was already fashion’s hottest sector into an even hotter one.
Keith Tran, the co-owner of Black Market,

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Street Signs: Roc-a-Fella Cofounder on Building Streetwear Brands

On Nov. 30, Nike will celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Air Force One by releasing five different styles designed by Errolson Hugh of Acronym, Virgil Abloh of Off-White, rapper Travis Scott, Don Crawley of Just Don, and Roc-a-Fella Records cofounder Kareem “Biggs” Burke.
Burke is the unofficial godfather of the group, and in many ways planted the seed from which the rest of the collaborators sprouted. It starts with Roc-a-Fella, which he founded with Jay-Z and Damon Dash in 1994, then moves on to Kanye West, who signed to Roc-a-Fella in the early Aughts. Both Abloh and Crawley, better known as Don C, are directly connected to West — Abloh was his creative director at one point and Crawley served as the road manager and DJ from time to time. And Scott is signed to Good Music, which is West’s record label.
“This is the offspring of what we’ve built,” said Burke. “To see Virgil and Don C’s success, I love that. People talk about legacy and how I want to be remembered and I just want that family tree to keep growing.”
The Roc-a-Fella Air Force One is the only shoe from the capsule that isn’t an entirely new design. In

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Fear of God’s Jerry Lorenzo on the Future of Luxury Streetwear

As much as Jerry Lorenzo operates outside of the fashion industry — he doesn’t hold shows, doesn’t present in line with the seasonal calendar and has no formal training as a designer — he’s managed to infiltrate the system by producing special product he believes is missing from the market.
He’s also managed to create and profit from an aesthetic that works in luxury settings and more mass environments — see the merchandise he designed with Justin Bieber and his collaborations with PacSun and Vans.
In a conversation with WWD style director Alex Badia, Lorenzo spoke about why he thinks his line has been able to break through and what he thinks the future holds for the luxury streetwear category. Here, excerpts from the conversation.
WWD: How did you start your business?
Jerry Lorenzo: I was living in Los Angeles. We have a Garment District downtown and you can make anything you want, whether it’s a couch or a long T-shirt. I was trying to find solutions for my own wardrobe because there were things I couldn’t find on the shelves and I figured why don’t I go downtown and make what I want. Before that I worked for the Los Angeles Dodgers and I

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Ralph Lauren Embraces Streetwear Distribution Model

The scene outside Ralph Lauren’s Prince Street store in Manhattan’s SoHo last Thursday was reminiscent of the crowds that routinely occupy particular blocks in New York awaiting the release of a sneaker or a hyped streetwear collection. But there were some differences. These customers were decidedly older and camera-shy — one evaded WWD’s photographer stating, “I’m supposed to be at work.” They were also wholly devoted to Ralph Lauren and many of them wore full looks from the designer, which they’ve been purchasing since they were teens.
After months of rumors surrounding the re-release of the Polo Stadium collection, one of Lauren’s most admired lines, the company finally confirmed on its Instagram account that it would be reissuing a limited-edition capsule of old and new styles to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the assortment. The line was first launched in 1992 and drew from the Olympic Summer Games. The capsule featured 12 styles including a popover, which retails for $ 195; a marsh coat, which retails for $ 495; a fitted cap, $ 50, and a polo that sells for $ 125.
Customers were instructed to show up at select Ralph Lauren locations on Sept. 19 to get a numbered wrist band that would allow them to

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Dolls Kill Launches Streetwear Line Poster Grl

STREET VIBES: Dolls Kill is adding its edgy perspective to streetwear with the launch of a new collection it’s calling Poster Grl.
The online multibrand retailer — specializing in looks inspired by a cross of styles borrowed from the punk, Goth and EDM scenes — on Tuesday rolls out what the company’s calling directional streetwear that adds just the amount of sex appeal to make it consistent with the rest of the Dolls Kills store, but also affordable.
The company, cofounded by chief executive officer Bobby Farahi and Shoddy Lynn, has made a name for itself since its 2011 launch by carrying edgy clothing and accessories with an antiestablishment attitude. The company’s online store carries a mix of the company’s own designs along with product from brands such as Wildfox Couture, One Teaspoon, Obey, Huf, Lazy Oaf and Dr. Martens. At the center of the merchandise mix and also what’s driving design and buying decisions at Dolls Kill, is the company’s reliance on what it calls its dolls. Each doll reflects a different persona and style. Those looking for rave-inspired looks, for example, can click on the doll named Kandi for all things coated in glitter and butterflies, or there’s Mercy for

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Kids’ Streetwear Line TheMiniClassy Heads to Nordstrom

High-end streetwear line for children TheMiniClassy will expand its distribution to include Nordstrom on Wednesday.
The line is sold on the TheMiniClassy’s e-commerce site and at Barneys New York. Starting at six and 12 months, the sizes run as high as 8 to 12. It is known for its harem pant with dinosaurlike fabric spikes down the sides of both legs, called the Original Dino Harem. Price points range from $ 30 to $ 64.
The kids’ apparel line was founded in 2014 by Michelle Lopez and Andrea Dotzauer, who got the idea as they were looking for on-trend, comfortable and washable items for their children.
 

Looks from TheMiniClassy. 
Courtesy Photo

 

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Streetwear, Sneaker Sellers Fine-Tune Product Drops

NEW YORK — On an unseasonably warm April day in New York, a young man practically skipped down Lafayette Street with friends while shouting into the screen of his smartphone, “We don’t stand in lines!”
Proudly clutching a Supreme bag, he was taunting the crowd of people gathered outside of the streetwear brand’s SoHo store for the release of its latest product. For this shopper, who was presumably filming a video of himself for Snapchat or Instagram, procuring something from the cult skater brand and not having to queue for it was an accomplishment.
Such boasting rights reflect that the frenzy around drops of coveted sneakers and limited-edition apparel has intensified — along with their frequency.
“If you looked at our product flow during the Nineties, early Aughts or even five years ago, from a quarterly standpoint, 85 percent of our drops happened in the first week of the quarter on Friday and Saturday,” said Erik Fagerlind, the cofounder of Sneakersnstuff, a Stockholm-based sneaker boutique that also operates locations in London, Paris and Berlin. “Today we have about 40 to 45 product drops weekly that are spread out over Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. These brands need social media mentions every five minutes and

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This Streetwear Brand Is Khloe Kardashian and Kanye West-Approved

ESC: Trendsetters At Work, Chris StampThe line between women’s and menswear has become increasingly blurred, thanks to designers like Chris Stamp.
The Colorado-born designer and owner of Stampd has created a following of…

E! Online (US) – Fashion Police

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How Bots Are Making It Impossible to Get Your Hands on Hyped Streetwear

Machines, and the industrious coders behind them, are running the streetwear asylum.

Style – Esquire

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Streetwear Sizzles in Russia Amid a Tepid Men’s Market

MOSCOW — The building that will house the future, larger Kuznetskiy Most 20 store here was last week wrapped in a giant orange banner declaring “стиль” — the Russian word for style.
It’s also a subbrand of Heron Preston, feted here in grand manner by KM20 owner Olga Karput. She also wrangled Off-White’s Virgil Abloh for an event that reflected feverish interest in American designers and the burgeoning luxury streetwear category they represent.
The trendy crowd, mostly men wearing the latest urban labels and collectible sneakers, shattered the stereotype that Russian men are indifferent to trends — and possibly signaled a light at the end of the tunnel for a country that has been mired in the retail doldrums.
“I think style is universal and fashion is small,” mused Preston, whose fall collection was showcased in a pop-up boutique in the raw space, decked out with vodka bars, a DJ booth — and a full-sized bulldozer — for the occasion. “The common thinking is that if you are not into fashion, you are not into style. But style is not only about clothes. It could also be how you ride a bike. My logo was picked because everyone can be connected with style without being in fashion.”
The tensions that have

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Supreme’s Lacoste Collab Might Just Make Preppy Streetwear Happen

The mashup you didn’t even know you wanted—until now.

Style – Esquire

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Check Out Aimé Leon Dore’s New Drop of Modern, Minimalist Streetwear

The New York-based brand teamed up with Canadian retailer SSENSE on an exclusive collection.

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Ones to Watch: New Faces of Streetwear From London

London is known for its streetwear scene, composed of a mash-up of subcultures including hip-hop, skateboarding and surfing. The popularity of the urban market has grown recently with obscure labels becoming more mainstream and newer brands launching. Here are a few designers on the rise who are getting set to present their collections during London Fashion Week Men’s.
A-Cold-Wall
Samuel Ross named his label A-Cold-Wall as a nod to Britain’s melting pot culture. “The inspiration behind the name came from the familiarity of environments,” the designer said. “Multiple class systems interact, with the people overlapping and integrating.”
Calling London a “mishmash of high/low property piled on top of each other” with its “distant relationships of working class and upper middle class areas,” these influences appear in A-Cold-Wall’s deconstructed workwear that includes oversize scarves used as a utility holster — a bestseller.
The 25-year-old Ross — who launched his label in 2015 — was born and raised in South West London and studied graphic design and contemporary Illustration at DeMontfort University in Leicester.
Before delving into fashion, he worked on graphic and product design at Imperial Design GB and Story Worldwide and dabbled in homewares, commercial buildouts and advertising campaigns. He also worked as a street artist and

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Can Urban Streetwear Brands Make a Resurgence?

Don’t call it a comeback.
Before there was streetwear, there was urban streetwear, which consisted of brands that were a direct product of hip-hop culture.
Walk into any retailer today, whether it’s a big-box chain or a luxury department store, and there are traces, reinterpretations and sometimes replicas of urban streetwear pieces from brands such as Fubu, Phat Farm, Rocawear, Sean John and others that hit their peak during the late Nineties and early Aughts.
While brands including Guess, Nautica and Calvin Klein have capitalized on this Nineties trend with capsule collections targeting a younger consumer — Guess partnered with A$ AP Rocky and Nautica tapped 19-year-old rapper Lil Yachty  — urban streetwear brands have yet to do the same.

Lil Yachty in a piece from the capsule collection. 

In some cases, it’s intentional as former teen favorites have opted to grow along with their customers and stop chasing a fickle young consumer. But for others, the industry says it’s impossible to make a major comeback given the current marketplace.
“I don’t want to make clothes for Millennials,” said Russell Simmons, who founded Phat Farm in 1992. “That’s not my brand.”
Simmons is instead concentrating on his new Los Angeles yoga studio and active line, which are both called Tantris

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StreetModa.com – Take an additional 40% OFF Women’s Street-wear with code: Street40

Take an additional 40% OFF Women’s Street-wear with code: Street40
Code: STREET40
Begin: 2014-08-27 00:00:00
Expire: 2014-09-02 00:00:00
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StreetModa.com – Take an additional 40% OFF Women’s Street-wear with code: Street40

Take an additional 40% OFF Women’s Street-wear with code: Street40
Code: STREET40
Begin: 2014-08-27 00:00:00
Expire: 2014-09-02 00:00:00
Coupon Feed