Vicky Krieps on why Phantom Thread is a feminist movie

The film has been criticised for its apparent “toxic masculinity”.
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Phantom Thread co-star on #MeToo’s America

Relatively unknown in America, Luxembourg native Vicky Krieps suddenly found herself at the heart of Hollywood’s awards season.
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Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Thomas Anderson on How They Created ‘Phantom Thread’

The stars and director of the provocative psychosexual drama detail the controlled chaos of the shoot Mr. Day-Lewis says will be his last.
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Daniel Day-Lewis’ ‘Phantom Thread’ Makes Stylish Box Office Debut

Daniel Day-Lewis’ fashion drama “Phantom Thread” performed impressively on its Christmas Day launch, earning $ 127,272 at four theaters for an average of $ 31,818 per screen. The Focus Features awards contender is expected to be Day-Lewis’ final film. The movie — set in 1950s post-war London — follows Day-Lewis, a renowned dressmaker, who, with his sister […]

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Open Thread: Open Thread: This Week in Style News

The psychology of the Black Friday mob, remembering Azzedine Alaïa — and more.
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Open Thread: Open Thread: This Week in Style News

What the Pirelli calendar says about race, remembering Kenneth Jay Lane and more.
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Nas Partners With The Thread Shop

Nas is capitalizing on the Nineties nostalgia wave.
The rapper and entrepreneur is teaming with The Thread Shop, Sony Music’s licensing and merchandising creative agency, to produce an apparel and accessories collection.
“The work Thread Shop is doing now is incredible,” said Nas. “They are the experts when it comes to strategic artist collaborations and were the obvious choice when I was looking to work with a full service creative agency. We are going to collaborate on a variety of projects this year. I’m excited for people to see what we have in store.”
This is a homecoming of sorts for Nas, who is currently under Mass Appeal Records but signed his first deal in 1992 with Columbia, which is a subsidiary of Sony.
“There is a resurgence of Nineties hip-hop as a trend and he’s definitely at the forefront of that,” said Frances Wong, vice president of The Thread Shop. “We are excited about reaching out to his fan base and continuing his legacy.”
In 2013 Nas launched Hstry, an apparel line he created with Grungy Gentleman. In 2014 he relaunched it as a stand-alone brand and last year he worked with Sony Pictures Consumer Marketing on a Hstry fashion collection to coincide with

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Hook & Albert Designs Men’s Bedding Line With Thread Experiment

Hook & Albert, a men’s accessories brand best known for its lapel pins, is getting into the home furnishings market.
The brand has teamed up with Thread Experiment to design a collection of bedding, targeted exclusively to men. The limited-edition set consists of a comforter, woven herringbone duvet and pillow sham in a navy and white color palette.
“As a brand, Hook & Albert has done a great job helping men accessorize themselves outside of the home. This partnership now allows our guy to bring that style inside the home,” said Adam Schoenberg, cochief executive officer of the label, which was founded in 2011 and acquired by Detail Provisions Co. in Dallas in mid-January.
“I became a huge fan of Hook & Albert after meeting cofounders, Adam Schoenberg and Cory Rosenberg a few years ago and hearing their story, inspirations and philosophy,” said Greg Shugar, cofounder of Thread Experiment.

The bedding will be sold on both companies’ web sites beginning on May 15. The pieces will retail separately for between $ 32 and $ 188.

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The Thread That Binds

The Thread That Binds


Sherice is a new mother, a sonographer, quilter, and wife; an overworked young woman whose elderly mother is slipping away from her. Sylvie is a newlywed and recent immigrant, unemployed and virtually penniless. Her husband’s paycheck can’t even cover prenatal care, let alone a baby, and her due date is only drawing nearer… Joanne’s unconventional pregnancy turns her world upside down, redefining her career and relationships, and even bringing to the surface long-buried demons from her past. Payton is seventeen, pregnant, and on the run. She flees to her uncle in Georgia with the hope of making a fresh start, but discovers making it on her own is harder than she could ever have imagined. Gloria is trapped in an unhappy marriage; in love with someone else. Her life is falling apart. With a baby on the way, would it be selfish to flee? Five women, once strangers, form bonds. Set in modern day Georgia, this is the story of friendship that blossoms in the land of country music, sweet tea, and secrets kept locked tight behind closed doors. Moving, funny, and at times heartbreaking, The Thread That Binds is a lesson in empathy, strength, and the beauty of love.

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Our Best Thread Crochet (Leisure Arts #2889)

Our Best Thread Crochet (Leisure Arts #2889)


Create sensational gifts, enchanting home decor, delightful gifts for baby, and ho-ho-ho holiday wonders with this wonderful collection of thread crochet. Choose from over 90 delightful designs featuring everything from ornaments to booties and more!
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The Common Thread That Connects Cartoonists At The New Yorker

While the cartoonists at The New Yorker have had a variety of different trajectories, there is a (rather odd) commonality that connects nearly all of them.

In addition to having fathers who were more than skeptical about their dream career paths, almost all of the artists had tense relationships with their moms when they were kids, filmmaker Leah Wolchok told HuffPost Live’s Josh Zepps on Monday.

“Everyone talked about their mothers,” she laughed. “Aside from Liana Fink, who seems to have a very healthy, thriving relationship with her mom and was inspired by her as an artist, I would say a lot of the cartoonists talk about the conflict they have with their mom growing up.”

Wolchok, who chronicled some of the publication’s illustrators for her HBO documentary, “Very Semi-Serious,” said the cartoonists also described a sense of loneliness and alienation at school, and quite a few remembered being “the smallest one who wasn’t getting chosen for the baseball team.”

But cartoonist Mort Gerberg assured that being passed over for the team in grade school had no bearing on his prospects for athletic success in the long run.

“The wonderful irony of that is for the past 10, 12, 15 years, I’ve been pitching for the softball team of The New Yorker. That’s my thing!” he said.

Watch the full HuffPost Live conversation with the cartoonists.

Want more HuffPost Live? Stream us anytime on Go90, Verizon’s mobile social entertainment network, and listen to our best interviews on iTunes.

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— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
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Z10 1/4 Thread Screw DV Action Mount for Bicycle (Blue)

Z10 1/4 Thread Screw DV Action Mount for Bicycle (Blue)


This action mount helps you to securely attach your video camcorder to a bicycle handlebar, helmet or other outdoor gear. In this way, you can record all the action while keeping your hands free.
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Katrina Coombs Discusses Her Fetish for Creating Fine-Art Fiber Works, Thread by Thread

It was the first thing you saw as you came through an arch at the National Gallery of Jamaica for the 2014 Jamaica Biennial: Katrina Coombs’s blood red work entitled “Absence.” I remember looking at the work for quite a while, its startling color. The longer I looked at the work the more I found myself wondering what other pieces by this artist might look like and, finally walking away, I made a mental note to look for more fiber-based works from Jamaican artists in general, and Katrina Coombs in particular.

Katrina Coombs was born in Kingston, Jamaica, and was formally introduced to the arts in third form at Meadowbrook High School. “What happened is that there was an art teacher at the school, David Ho-Sang, who introduced us to macramé. That was when my interest in fibers started and soon that interest would grow into a profound love,” she shared. From macramé she would branch out to batiks and other arts techniques, but the love of fibers remained constant. “I guess you could say I have a fetish for fibers,” she confessed. “I love being able to create from threads. I love the idea of taking something from a small strand into something large and elegant. I love the involved process of working with pins and needles.”

From high school Coombs would go on to attend the Edna Manley College of Visual and Performing Arts in Kingston, which she describes as an eye-opening and very challenging experience. “When I was a student at the Edna Manley College, textile as fine arts was still a relatively new concept. The textiles department had to bring in lecturers from other departments to look at and critique my work. I was getting more and more interested in weaving, which isn’t a traditional Jamaican art form, unless you look at basketry, so I guess there was some confusion in trying to locate and situate my work as a fine artist working with cloth.”

Maybe, she mused, the lack of understanding for fiber and textile as a fine-art art form that she was sensing all around her on the island had to do in part with the demise of a booming textile industry in Jamaica — lost through free trade agreements. “There was just a whole industry of people who made cloth and designed and decorated cloth that went through the window because of free trade agreements,” she said. “A similar thing happened to much of our traditional so-called “craft” industry where much of the local crafts forms today are actually being made in China.”

But the loss of the textile industry, she was quick to point out to me, only partly explains the resistance she faced as a fine-art fiber artist. “While my immediate family members were always supportive of me as a fiber artist, there were a lot of people around me who were confused by what I was doing. They saw me sewing things and would ask aloud about not only what was I going to do with the things I was making, but if indeed I planned on becoming a dressmaker, as if being a dressmaker was the worst thing in the world that someone could be! But that confusion, to an extent, mirrors a larger societal confusion as to what art is. For too many people art is still and will only be drawing, sculpture and painting. There is oftentimes no immediate understanding of textile art as a viable art form.”

Yet her thesis exhibition at the Edna Manley College, “Dancer’s Dream” — a work in which she examined the various elements of fabric movement and how this could be in conversation with the movements of a dancer — was well received. “I guess the reason why my thesis received the warm reception that it did is that so many people were taken with the ‘new’ ways in which I was working with cloth. There was a healthy discussion, for example, as to whether my work was a sculpture or a painting — and there was a new awareness of fiber as fine art,” she said.

Coombs would go on to do her master’s degree at Transart Institute in Berlin and New York, which, she admits, radically altered how she saw her work. She credits Transart with engendering in her a more expansive definition of being an artist. “In a sense, going to Transart freed me. What I mean by this is that, here in Jamaica you are often defined by the medium that you work in. For a long time I considered myself, for example, a textile artist. It was at Transart that I came to understand that I was an artist first and foremost and fiber was the medium that I created in,” she told me.

At Transart her work became increasingly autobiographical, culminating in a thesis exhibition that explored various notions of the “other”. This work — a compilation of thirteen characters — sought to answer several questions, namely: Who is the other, and why do they impact us as much? What form does the other take? How can an artist use fibers to signify the other that she is in pursuit of?

It is a complex and engaging body of work.

Given that Katrina Coombs works almost exclusively in fibers, I engaged her in a discussion on the gender dimensions of artists on the island who work specifically with textiles and fibers. Specifically, I wanted to know why there seemingly were no male textile and fiber artists on the island.

“It is not that there are no male textile artists on the island or that men are not interested in textiles and fibers,” Coombs pointed out to me. “It is the mode by which men approach the work that they do in textiles and fibers. You will find, for example, that you have a large group of tailors. There are also very sharp and pointed distinctions made between fine and applied arts on the island. Once you are working with textiles, you are often relegated to crafts. Maybe why there aren’t more male fine artists who work in textiles on the island is that they are trying to obviate being relegated to the crafts.”

She paused for a moment before continuing.

“In addition to which, in general fiber art is a very complex medium to deal in. The medium requires a lot of focus, a lot of technical skills, the tying of knots, and working with all those threads. There is a lot of monotony in working in fibers, which, for me, is a commentary on female labor and the fact that women are constantly repeating things. The home space, which to a large extent is still the female space, is one of endless repetition with specifically female tasks. Furthermore, at this time on the island, I am not sure if there is an infrastructure in place to safeguard and protect fibers and textiles as art forms. Handling and restoration are a particular challenge. My thinking is that more male artists might be making the calculus to choose art forms that are more financially lucrative and less repetitive and less problematic than is required for working in textiles and fibers.”

But the very reasons why fiber art forms might be off-putting for some is in large part why Katrina Coombs enjoys so much working within this medium. Textiles, Coombs noted, are a constant throughout the many moments and journeys of our lives. Shortly after we are born we are enveloped in cloth, and for most of our lives we have the most intimate relationship to clothes. When we die, once again, we are wrapped in cloth. In some ways it is the most obvious and accessible of all the art forms.

Katrina Coombs’s work will be on view at the Young Talent 2015 exhibition at the National Gallery of Jamaica in Kingston, which opens on August 30th. “I am very excited to be part of this exhibition,” Coombs shared. “For many years, as a curatorial assistant, I promoted the work of other artists. Right now I am taking some time to pay more attention to my own work. My goal now is to keep pushing myself as an artist, and to get more of an audience for my work.”

Until next time.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Arts – The Huffington Post
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Save up to 83% on 550 Thread Count Cotton Rich Sheet Sets at Anna’s Linens! Offer ends 3/1/15. …

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Rosena Sammi striped thread bangle set

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