Transforming Tulsa, Starting with a Park

Can a billionaire bring together his divided city? With Gathering Place, George B. Kaiser and Michael Van Valkenburgh challenge what an urban park can be.
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Lady Gaga Shares Message Before Grammys About Transforming ‘Grief’ That Inspired Joanne Into ‘Hope’

Just hours before the 2018 Grammy Awards, Lady Gaga shared a touching message about the late aunt who inspired her latest album Joanne.

“I have carried a deep grief in my heart over my family’s tragedy,” she wrote on social media, referring to her late aunt, Joanne Stefani Germanotta, who died of lupus complications at age 19.

“The loss of Joanne affected my father so deeply that it affected me. When he cried, I cried. When he was angry, I was angry. When he was hurt, I hurt,” she continued.

She added, “Today I transform this grief to hope and healing. After 10 years with you I still get nervous before the Grammys, but I know I have an angel with me.”

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The 31-year-old songstress also shared the heartfelt message alongside a picture of “me and @MarcRonson writing #Joanne.”

“I love you little monsters,” she added.

Be sure to check out PEOPLE’s full Grammys coverage to get the latest news on music’s big night.

In addition to performing at the Grammys this year, Gaga has been nominated for best pop solo performance (“Million Reasons”) and best pop vocal album (Joanne).

The singer had previously shared how “honored” she felt to be performing from her deeply personal album at the award show.

“I’m so honored to be singing from #Joanne,” she wrote on Saturday, adding, “This album and moment with little monsters means so much to me.”

RELATED: Why Are Stars Wearing White Roses to the Grammys?

Though the pop star was born nearly 12 years after Joanne’s death, she remains one of Gaga’s biggest influences.

“When Mark and I wrote it, the decision to name the album that was in tribute to my father’s sister who died when she was 19,” she told Beats 1’s Zane Lowe of her poet/painter aunt in September 2016, one month before her album’s release.

She went on to reveal that the album encompassed “everything about Joanne, which also happens to be my middle name.”

“It’s all the toughness of the pain of losing her that made us all strong and made us who we are,” Gaga added. “She is the woman of my past who is becoming and helping me bring more of my honest woman self into the future.”

RELATED VIDEO: Here’s the List of Nominees for the 2018 Grammy Awards

On Saturday, the 31-year-old was also spotted stepping out hand-in-hand with  boyfriend Christian Carino as they made their way to Marta Italian Restaurant in New York City following Grammys rehearsals on Saturday.

PEOPLE confirmed Gaga and Carino’s romance in February 2017, weeks after the budding couple was spotted getting affectionate at a Kings of Leon concert and cuddling on the Super Bowl LI field.

The 60th annual Grammy Awards, hosted by James Corden, are broadcast live from Madison Square Garden in New York City on CBS starting at 7:30 p.m. ET on Sunday.


PEOPLE.com

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Transforming Mug – This Calls for Wonder Woman

Transforming Mug – This Calls for Wonder Woman


Every time you add hot liquid, this mug transforms — and so does Wonder Woman! The cold mug features Wonder Woman in her secret identity as Diana Prince. But when you add a steamy beverage and things heat up, the mug changes color and the Amazon Princess flies through the air to save Steve Trevor from a menacing UFO! Wonder Woman makes your coffee break more thrilling and your afternoon tea more exciting! Now you can look forward to your every heart-pounding chai!
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Women’s Poetry of Late Imperial China: Transforming the Inner Chambers

Women’s Poetry of Late Imperial China: Transforming the Inner Chambers


This study of poetry by women in late imperial China examines the metamorphosis of the trope of the inner chambers (gui), to which women were confined in traditional Chinese households, and which in literature were both a real and an imaginary place. Originally popularized in sixth-century palace style poetry, the inner chambers were used by male writers as a setting in which to celebrate female beauty, to lament the loneliness of abandoned women, and by extension, to serve as a political allegory for the exile of loyal and upright male ministers spurned by the imperial court. Female writers of lyric poetry (ci) soon adopted the theme, beginning its transition from male fantasy to multidimensional representation of women and their place in society, and eventually its manifestation in other poetic genres as well.Emerging from the role of sexual objects within poetry, late imperial women were agents of literary change in their expansion and complication of the boudoir theme. While some take ownership and de-eroticizing its imagery for their own purposes, adding voices of children and older women, and filling the inner chambers with purposeful activity such as conversation, teaching, religious ritual, music, sewing, childcare, and chess-playing, some simply want to escape from their confinement and protest gender restrictions imposed on women. Women''s Poetry of Late Imperial China traces this evolution across centuries, providing and analyzing examples of poetic themes, motifs, and imagery associated with the inner chambers, and demonstrating the complication and nuancing of the gui theme by increasingly aware and sophisticated women writers.
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Transforming a College: The Story of a Little-Known College’s Strategic Climb to National Distinction

Transforming a College: The Story of a Little-Known College’s Strategic Climb to National Distinction


Forty years ago, North Carolina’s Elon College was struggling to attract students and remain solvent. Today Elon enrolls students from 46 states and 40 foreign countries. Since 1988, it has erected a new library, student center, football stadium, fitness center, and science facilities on its 500-acre campus. The number of applications has risen 40 percent since 1995, and SAT scores of incoming students have improved by 98 points. Elon has emerged as one of America’s most desirable colleges.How did this transformation happen? What can other colleges and universities learn from Elon’s remarkable turnaround? Taking a new approach to the study of higher education, George Keller examines the decisions made by Elon’s administration, trustees, and faculty to transform a school with a limited endowment into a top regional university. Using Elon as a case study, Keller sheds light on high-stakes competition among America’s colleges and universities-where losers face contraction or closure and winners gain money, talented students, and top faculty.
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Transforming a College: The Story of a Little-Known College’s Strategic Climb to National Distinction

Transforming a College: The Story of a Little-Known College’s Strategic Climb to National Distinction


Forty years ago, North Carolina’s Elon College was struggling to attract students and remain solvent. Today Elon enrolls students from 46 states and 40 foreign countries. Since 1988, it has erected a new library, student center, football stadium, fitness center, and science facilities on its 500-acre campus. The number of applications has risen 40 percent since 1995, and SAT scores of incoming students have improved by 98 points. Elon has emerged as one of America’s most desirable colleges. How did this transformation happen? What can other colleges and universities learn from Elon’s remarkable turnaround? Taking a new approach to the study of higher education, George Keller examines the decisions made by Elon’s administration, trustees, and faculty to transform a school with a limited endowment into a top regional university. Using Elon as a case study, Keller sheds light on high-stakes competition among America’s colleges and universities — where losers face contraction or closure and winners gain money, talented students, and top faculty.
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Meet ‘Beirut’s Banksy,’ The Artist Who’s Transforming The City One Wall At A Time

Artist Yazan Halwani peels political banners and posters off Beirut’s walls to make room for his murals. Born in the Lebanese capital, Halwani, 22, grew up against the backdrop of political logos stenciled on city walls and faded posters of politicians plastered on street corners, some left over from the civil war that lasted from 1975 to 1990.

In Lebanon, “people usually identify with sectarian or political symbols,” Halwani said. Frustrated with the political fragmentation and sectarian strife on and off the walls of Beirut, he decided to draw the public’s attention to cultural figures that “reunite Lebanese, and Arab citizens, without any divisions.” On walls and buildings in East and West Beirut (which were separated during the civil war), he paints large-scale portraits of Arab poets, musicians and actors, encircled by intricate Arabic calligraphy.

Born a couple of years after the war, Halwani is part of a generation of Lebanese youth pushing, in various ways, for greater unity in Lebanon. With his artwork, he strives to offset decades of political polarization that has resulted in cultural divisions and “a weakening of national identity.”

Referred to as “Beirut’s Banksy” by Arab media outlet Al-Arabiya, Halwani has also produced artwork for international street art events, and his work has appeared in Germany, Singapore and Paris. By taking his calligraphy outside the Arab region, Halwani says, he wants to instigate “cross-cultural conversations” and to inspire a “positive view of the Arab world.”

But it’s his work in Beirut that’s garnering the world’s attention.

Political paralysis is nothing new in Lebanon’s government, which is tenuously balanced according to the country’s religious factions. But it has reached new heights: The country’s parliament has failed to pick a president for more than one year, and its inaction and corruption leaves much of the country without regular access to services like electricity and water. This summer, more than 20,000 tons of garbage has accumulated on Beirut’s streets after a major landfill closed and the government failed to agree on an alternative dump or a new contract for its garbage collection company.

Residents began to protest, resulting in the YouStink campaign decrying their officials. Public frustration peaked last month, with the recent wave of protests in the capital being described as “the biggest show of civil disobedience” in a decade. 

Halwani marched in a mass YouStink rally in downtown Beirut on Aug. 22. 

“I think the current problem and the main motivation behind my artwork stem from the same reason,” says Halwani. “Sectarian political forces that are working in their own self-interest.”

Halwani won’t write political slogans on Beirut’s walls, though. By painting much less polarizing figures, he subversively proposes an alternative cultural and political narrative: one of unity and harmony.

“I think that what needs to be done on a political level cannot be summed up with a wall tag,” he says.  

Along the side of a building in the vibrant district of Hamra, Lebanese singer-actress Sabah peers out onto the street, smiling disarmingly, surrounded by a halo of interwoven Arabic letters that look like snowflakes from afar. Across an orange wall in the lively residential district of Gemmayzeh, Halwani painted beloved musical icon Fairouz, in black, white and grey.

“I want to replace corrupt politics with more positive cultural elements that show the real face of the country,” he says.

Halwani’s street art hasn’t always been propelled by such lofty ambitions. At the age of 14, he was drawn to French hip-hop songs and gangster films. “Everyone wanted to grow up to be a soldier or an actor, but I wanted to be a gangster like these taggers in New York,” he says. He started tagging his name on Beirut’s walls, in bright colors and big letters. Later, however, he experienced what he calls a “critical response” toward his own work. “I realized that what I was doing did not have a shred of identity. It had no relationship to Beirut. That’s why people ignored or destroyed it.”

Around the same time, Halwani borrowed a calligraphy book from his uncle. He quickly discovered that there was a discrepancy between the essence of calligraphy and that of tagging; the former was less about the artist and more about the words (often Quranic verses or folkloric proverbs.). “I was no longer interested in writing my name,” he says.

In fact, he was no longer interested in writing anything at all. The Arabic letters he places around his portraits often don’t make up legible words; they’re more like ornate crossword puzzles. “What I try to do is I try to evoke meaning without having to use the actual word … I use calligraphy to create an Arabic visual language which can be understood by Arabic and non-Arabic speakers alike,” he noted.

Often, he seeks to paint murals that start conversations. On one of the walls in Concord Street is a portrait of a gray-haired man, his eyelids on the verge of caving in, his gaze despondent. His creased forehead is crowned with tufts of white and grey hair. The portrait is of Ali Abdullah, a homeless man who for years had set up residence in the nearby Bliss Street. In January 2013, Beirut’s harsh weather reportedly led to his death. The incident mobilized hundreds of Lebanese youth to launch initiatives to help the homeless.

“After two weeks, everybody forgot about him,” says Halwani. “I decided to repaint him, just to tell people that you do not need to help the homeless only when you hear a tragic story on the news.”

As Halwani was standing in a shopping cart, with blotches of black paint on his shorts and T-shirt, a worn out taxi pulled up by the curb. A teary-eyed driver called Halwani over, and said, “When I saw what you’re doing, I was really touched. I used to see this homeless man on the street.”

Three years later, Halwani is still touched by what happened next: Desperate to give something, anything, back to the artist, the driver offered him a ride. “All I have is this car. If you need to go anywhere, I’m ready to take you,” the driver told him.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Arts – The Huffington Post
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Priority Areas For National Action: Transforming Health CareQuality

Priority Areas For National Action: Transforming Health CareQuality


(Institute of Medicine) Report is one in a series initiated by the Institute of Medicine to improve the quality of health care in America. Text specifies 20 areas recommended as priorities in need of quality improvement. Includes preventative health care, chronic disease management, long-term and palliative care. Softcover.
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Win the Weight War: 10 Transforming Perspectives to Take It Off and Keep It Off

Win the Weight War: 10 Transforming Perspectives to Take It Off and Keep It Off


But, you might say, I’ve read lots of diet books, and none of them have worked. I hear you. However, this book is different. Using an NLP framework, Jill Cody helps you address numerous emotional roadblocks that keep you stuck in your old thinking and eating habits. The main points in this book may seem obvious at first, but are extremely important in helping you be successful in winning the weight war.
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Transforming a College

Transforming a College


Forty years ago, North Carolina’s Elon College was struggling to attract students and remain solvent. Today Elon enrolls students from 46 states and 40 foreign countries. Since 1988, it has erected a new library, student center, football stadium, fitness center, and science facilities on its 500-acre campus.

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