Gigi Hadid is Super Uncomfortable About Nicki & Cardi B Fight

Fashion? Yes. Feuds between Nicki Minaj & Cardi B? Not so much. See Gigi's displeased reaction to the fight that broke out at a NYFW party.
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In This Play About Race, ‘People Need to Be Uncomfortable’

There have been complaints that “Fairview,” currently at Soho Rep, goes too far and complaints that it doesn’t go far enough.
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The uncomfortable silence of Kawhi Leonard

What’s behind the tension between the Spurs and Kawhi Leonard’s camp? And how will the NBA’s most fascinating mystery end?
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The Uncomfortable Marriage Between China and Its Tech Giants

In China’s tech world, cheerleading from the government comes with a lot of benefits—and a lot of money. But Beijing also wants more control and the nation’s internet billionaires can’t exactly say no.
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School District Scrubs ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Because It Makes People ‘Uncomfortable’

“If ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ makes you uncomfortable, you should probably be reading ‘To Kill a Mockingbird.'”
Arts
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Lift, Laugh, Love: Another Helping of Tips, Tricks, and Uncomfortable Overshares from The Great Fitness Experiment

Lift, Laugh, Love: Another Helping of Tips, Tricks, and Uncomfortable Overshares from The Great Fitness Experiment


Charlotte Hilton Andersen is the author of the book The Great Fitness Experiment: One Year of Trying Everything. She runs the popular health and fitness website of the same name, where she tries out a new workout every month, specializing in exercise, body image and oversharing. She was named one of Demand Media''s top 3 bloggers for 2010, one of Fitness Magazine''s favorite fitness bloggers and a fitness expert by Experience Life Magazine''s A Revolutionary Act.On a regular basis she writes for The Huffington Post, Redbook Magazine, iVillage, Men''s Fitness, Shape Magazine and BlogHer. In addition, she has been featured on ABC''s 20/20 and Fox''s morning show and interviewed on Fox, NBC and many radio stations. Her writing has appeared in several health and fitness magazines as well as the online content of The Washington Post, USA Today, Fox News, and Livestrong among others. A former professor, her night job is grading the SAT essay where she gets to grade 500 high school essays each answering the same prompt, causing her to curse any time The Scarlet Letter is mentioned in her presence. She is a mom of five currently going crazy in Minnesota.
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Plus-Size Vlogger Doesn’t Care If Her Bikini Body Makes You ‘Uncomfortable’

“Why is it that someone else can dictate that you are not allowed to put something on your body that makes them uncomfortable?”

Such is one of just a few questions worth asking when it comes to what women choose to wear near bodies of water. YouTube star and plus-size fashion vlogger Loey Lane is fed up with nasty comments that degrade plus-size women for wearing bikinis. And she decided to do something about it.

Lane recently posted a video expertly shutting down the body-shamers. She poses important questions like, “Why [should] someone who is larger…have to cover more square inches of their body?” and why fellow beach-goers comfort level has anything to do with what she chooses to wear.

Lane also addresses the common, yet still absurd assumption that bigger women who show off their bodies are asking for feedback on how they look. She says, “Any woman, no matter her size, any man, any human being, they’re not looking for your approval or your praise of what they’re wearing.”

Lane’s bikini body haters have no right to tell her — or anyone else — whether or not they should sport a swimsuit. If you have a body and a two-piece, BAM! You’ve got yourself one beach-ready bikini bod.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Style – The Huffington Post
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Relinquishing Our Uncomfortable Inheritance: Eran Riklis’ A Borrowed Identity

2015-07-03-1435946354-6320665-ABI_6.jpg

Tawfeek Barhom and Yaël Abecassis in Eran Riklis’ A Borrowed Identity, photographed by Eitan Riklis

The first film I ever watched by Eran Riklis was The Syrian Bride, starring Hiam Abbass and Makram Khoury. I remember how enthusiastic I was to finally learn something that wasn’t commonplace about the Druze community in the Golan Heights, through the work of this wondrous filmmaker. Fast forward to years later when, at a party, upon meeting a Syrian Druze gentleman I exclaimed “OMG, you must watch The Syrian Bride, it’s a gorgeous film about your community made by an Israeli director.” The man looked at me in disbelief and answered “What does an Israeli know about the Druze!” It was then that I first realized how our origin, our background affects what we’re allowed, and not allowed to talk about, even as artists.

Thanks goodness Riklis never got that memo!

From Cup Final to The Human Resources Manager, from Lemon Tree to Zaytoun, Riklis has always talked about the untalkable in his films: Peace, humanity, and the ability to discuss what makes us different, while also celebrating our contrasts.

I’m a year late in watching Riklis’ latest, A Borrowed Identity — also known as Dancing Arabs, the film’s original title at festivals around the world, and Mon Fils, “My Son” in its French incarnation. But better late than never in this case, because once again, I walk away from one of Eran’s films a different woman, a more informed person and a better human being. It’s become the norm for me with the work of the most open-minded, best cultural bridge-building filmmaker I know.

Typically, I would have watched a film like A Borrowed Identity in Cannes or Venice. But the film ends with such a provocative scene, an idea so unthinkable and bold that I can only imagine the programmers at those festivals scrambling to find words to explain their choices to the press. Simpler for them to just turn it down, quietly. So while it premiered at Locarno, where it was also not given the Golden Leopard it deserved for the same reasons, I assume, A Borrowed Identity traveled a different festival route, finding its biggest success in open-minded Telluride. Now, it is finally in US theaters, enjoying a second week at Lincoln Plaza in NYC, rolling out to West Coast theaters this weekend, and later across the US.

A Borrowed Identity opens with a line by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish that goes “Identity is our legacy and not our inheritance; our invention and not our memory…” So why should where, how and who we are born decide what we can and cannot do? Unfortunately, not everyone in this world can make a choice, or even attempt to wonder aloud what I’m writing know. Palestinians and Israelis risk much when they do.

Riklis’ film begins slowly. But it builds momentum to a finish that left me and my viewing companion in sobs.

I’ll admit something that shames me, I might have left the theater in the first twenty minutes if I didn’t possess the faith I have in this filmmaker’s genius. The background about the family, the part that comes from the first of Sayed Kashua’s books to make up the storyline of A Borrowed IdentityDancing Arabs — didn’t envelop me right away. Perhaps I would have liked only a hint of the grandmother, as a voiceover, with the fated suitcase opening upon her death and the instructions carried out by her nephew, Eyad (played by the most charismatic acting discovery of the year, Tawfeek Barhom). The story could have started there for me, I didn’t need childhood scenes or interiors.

Yet once Kashua’s narrative from Second Person Singular kicked in, the film grabbed me wholeheartedly. There was no turning back, no turning away from that big screen even for a minute, only and completely with all my being following the triangle of Eyad, Yonathan (played to perfection by Michael Moshonov) and his mother Edna (played by one of my favorite actresses, the stunning Yaël Abecassis). What followed turned out to be, once again, one of those Eran Riklis masterpieces of endless possibilities.

Israeli Arab novelist and journalist Sayed Kashua also wrote the screenplay for the film, which may explain the indulgence of the family set-up. To a writer’s format such details are necessary, while in a film they can be done away with. Though Eyad’s father Salah’s efforts (played by Ali Suliman), to send his son off to an Israeli Hebrew school, clarify much and probably couldn’t be dealt with differently in the narrative.

In the end, A Borrowed Identity left me with more questions than answers, more thoughts than words. That’s what a great film should always do, while also helping its audience to understand themselves and the world around them just a little bit more. It’s a film full of courage, by a filmmaker who is unafraid and unapologetic about who he is. And perfect proof that our background, our birth-given opportunities have very little to do with the person we become, despite what the world wants us to believe.

For info and screenings check out the Strand Releasing website.

Image by Eitan Riklis courtesy of Strand Releasing, used with permission.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



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Relinquishing Our Uncomfortable Inheritance: Eran Riklis’ A Borrowed Identity

2015-07-03-1435946354-6320665-ABI_6.jpg

Tawfeek Barhom and Yaël Abecassis in Eran Riklis’ A Borrowed Identity, photographed by Eitan Riklis

The first film I ever watched by Eran Riklis was The Syrian Bride, starring Hiam Abbass and Makram Khoury. I remember how enthusiastic I was to finally learn something that wasn’t commonplace about the Druze community in the Golan Heights, through the work of this wondrous filmmaker. Fast forward to years later when, at a party, upon meeting a Syrian Druze gentleman I exclaimed “OMG, you must watch The Syrian Bride, it’s a gorgeous film about your community made by an Israeli director.” The man looked at me in disbelief and answered “What does an Israeli know about the Druze!” It was then that I first realized how our origin, our background affects what we’re allowed, and not allowed to talk about, even as artists.

Thanks goodness Riklis never got that memo!

From Cup Final to The Human Resources Manager, from Lemon Tree to Zaytoun, Riklis has always talked about the untalkable in his films: Peace, humanity, and the ability to discuss what makes us different, while also celebrating our contrasts.

I’m a year late in watching Riklis’ latest, A Borrowed Identity — also known as Dancing Arabs, the film’s original title at festivals around the world, and Mon Fils, “My Son” in its French incarnation. But better late than never in this case, because once again, I walk away from one of Eran’s films a different woman, a more informed person and a better human being. It’s become the norm for me with the work of the most open-minded, best cultural bridge-building filmmaker I know.

Typically, I would have watched a film like A Borrowed Identity in Cannes or Venice. But the film ends with such a provocative scene, an idea so unthinkable and bold that I can only imagine the programmers at those festivals scrambling to find words to explain their choices to the press. Simpler for them to just turn it down, quietly. So while it premiered at Locarno, where it was also not given the Golden Leopard it deserved for the same reasons, I assume, A Borrowed Identity traveled a different festival route, finding its biggest success in open-minded Telluride. Now, it is finally in US theaters, enjoying a second week at Lincoln Plaza in NYC, rolling out to West Coast theaters this weekend, and later across the US.

A Borrowed Identity opens with a line by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish that goes “Identity is our legacy and not our inheritance; our invention and not our memory…” So why should where, how and who we are born decide what we can and cannot do? Unfortunately, not everyone in this world can make a choice, or even attempt to wonder aloud what I’m writing know. Palestinians and Israelis risk much when they do.

Riklis’ film begins slowly. But it builds momentum to a finish that left me and my viewing companion in sobs.

I’ll admit something that shames me, I might have left the theater in the first twenty minutes if I didn’t possess the faith I have in this filmmaker’s genius. The background about the family, the part that comes from the first of Sayed Kashua’s books to make up the storyline of A Borrowed IdentityDancing Arabs — didn’t envelop me right away. Perhaps I would have liked only a hint of the grandmother, as a voiceover, with the fated suitcase opening upon her death and the instructions carried out by her nephew, Eyad (played by the most charismatic acting discovery of the year, Tawfeek Barhom). The story could have started there for me, I didn’t need childhood scenes or interiors.

Yet once Kashua’s narrative from Second Person Singular kicked in, the film grabbed me wholeheartedly. There was no turning back, no turning away from that big screen even for a minute, only and completely with all my being following the triangle of Eyad, Yonathan (played to perfection by Michael Moshonov) and his mother Edna (played by one of my favorite actresses, the stunning Yaël Abecassis). What followed turned out to be, once again, one of those Eran Riklis masterpieces of endless possibilities.

Israeli Arab novelist and journalist Sayed Kashua also wrote the screenplay for the film, which may explain the indulgence of the family set-up. To a writer’s format such details are necessary, while in a film they can be done away with. Though Eyad’s father Salah’s efforts (played by Ali Suliman), to send his son off to an Israeli Hebrew school, clarify much and probably couldn’t be dealt with differently in the narrative.

In the end, A Borrowed Identity left me with more questions than answers, more thoughts than words. That’s what a great film should always do, while also helping its audience to understand themselves and the world around them just a little bit more. It’s a film full of courage, by a filmmaker who is unafraid and unapologetic about who he is. And perfect proof that our background, our birth-given opportunities have very little to do with the person we become, despite what the world wants us to believe.

For info and screenings check out the Strand Releasing website.

Image by Eitan Riklis courtesy of Strand Releasing, used with permission.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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Neville Longbottom Did a Sexy Photo Shoot (and J.K. Rowling Feels Really Uncomfortable About It)

Ever since the final Harry Potter movie debuted, fans have been fixated on actor Matthew Lewis—a.k.a. Neville Longbottom—because he went from this… …to THIS: These days, Lewis is still acting, and he just scored the…




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Jerry Seinfeld’s Worst Bomb Ever Sounds Very, Very Uncomfortable

It’s easy to forget that even the most successful of comedians once had to rise their way up through the ranks.

Luckily, Jerry Seinfeld reminds us of this fact in a new web exclusive for “The Tonight Show,” in which he shares the story of his worst standup set ever. Back in 1977, when he was 22, Seinfeld scored a gig at a disco in Queens on New Year’s Eve. Let’s just say it didn’t go well, and there’s little evidence anyone at the venue even knew he was there.

“The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” airs weeknights at 11:35 p.m. ET on NBC.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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